37

The main question is this: Is your dog Single coated with hairs that grow endlessly at a constant speed? Or double coated with hairs that grow to a predefined length and are shed? Single coated breeds are often "fashion" or "toy" breeds like Poodles and Shih Tzu. They actually do need regular hair cuts because their hairs don't stop ...


17

Have you ever seen wolves hunt in the snow wearing their winter boots? 😉 So the short answer is: No, unless there's a specific medical condition you don't. Make sure the dog has a warm place to stay in rather than stand/sit on the cold floor all the time and you should be fine. Far more important, depending on where you live, is cleaning the paws from salt (...


10

Cats do enjoy warm surfaces and there are a few options to entice her into her house. Depending on what her house looks like, you can add a heat lamp, just be careful the lamp does not touch anything as this poses a fire hazard. I have seen outdoor cat houses in Canada with these to keep feral cats warm during the winter. Pet heat mats - these mats ...


9

So, there are breeds of dogs where this is clearly not necessary (e.g. any sled dog) and may cause overheating if engaged in strenuous activity. Bearing in mind that all dogs have some insulating features to a greater or lesser degree, so there's no one-size fits all, you did mention some rules of thumb to consider1: Small dogs have less of a self-heating ...


8

A cat's natural body temperature ranges from 100.5-102.5F, a bit higher than humans. A good general rule is if you're comfortable, the cat will be comfortable. My mom has Sphynx, and like people, they go find a blanket if they're cold. (She keeps her house around 71F.) If you haven't already, get it a bed, with a small blanket. Put it somewhere off the ...


8

It really depends on where you live and on the dog (breed/coat, age, health, personality). Each dog is different and has different needs. Some dogs can withstand the cold, but really hate it and should not be forced to endure it. Puppies should never be exposed to the cold for extended periods. Adult labs will be fine, just make sure to give them extra food ...


6

See this answer of mine for a few suggestions. Also a rubbing a cat down with a wet towel is perfectly fine. In fact if it is very hot it is definitely encouraged as long as your cat isnt stressed from it! Also it is natural for cats to be lazy during heatwaves. They dont want to make themselves warmer and overheat. Many people are the same way, i think. ...


6

I personally have a long hair double coat cat (Maine Coon) but most my info comes from reading Husky forums. Here is what some online forums say: Shaving is not necessary for a double fur cat. It seems like it would help to us but many breeder specific pages are extremely against shaving pets (especially double coat animals like Huskies or Maine Coons). The ...


6

Depending upon the type of fish, it may be possible. Some fish are able to survive in a bit cooler water. However, there are some fish that are extremely sensitive to temperature, for example angelfish are very sensitive, and I don't think they would survive. I have had fish such as guppies and neon tetras that were able to survive for a couple days without ...


6

John has great points in his answer (+1). Domestic rabbits are more tolerant of cold temperatures than heat. I reached out to the chief medical officer of Rabbit Wranglers to get more information before posting this answer. In general, inside of a home, rabbits are unlikely to encounter temperatures that are too cool. See related question for temperature ...


6

Animal fur is an insulator. People commonly have the misconception that insulators keep in heat. The truth is that all insulators inhibit the transfer of heat, and this works in BOTH directions. Meaning, when it's cold out, the insulator will keep heat in, and when it's hot out, the insulator will keep the heat out. Adding to the misconception is the fact ...


6

I agree 100% with Elmy Sometimes when groomers are trained, they may not be told or may not absorb the true reason for doing certain tasks in certain ways. They may simply be told, "Don't do this". There are plenty of folk-tales circulating in the dog world that have little or no scientific basis. A groomer will know that it is a bad idea to trim ...


5

The filter shouldn't matter. A proper setup shouldn't build up anything harmful that quickly. I realize that's a loaded assumption, but with a crazily out of whack bio-load, I doubt even a good filter would keep everyone safe. However, most types of filters do have the added benefit of increasing oxygen exchange. Again, that's something that under most ...


5

I suspect you're worrying more than you need to on this score. Wild rabbits handle Canadian winter conditions without issue, based on the bunny tracks all over my yard, and this was a harsher winter than most. While domestic rabbits aren't the same as wild ones, they're not so vastly different that you couldn't draw some conclusions, especially since they ...


5

Possible frame challenge here, but your cat isn't using the house because she doesn't need it. Her fur is cold to the touch because it's working - it's keeping body heat inside. And just like your ears, her ears will be perfectly OK at lower than body temperatures. Not all mammalian extremities need to be at full body temperature. This is why a furred ...


5

One way to do this is to get an extra aquarium heater and a large container. Set the heater to the same temperature as your tank and let the water slowly heat up overnight. By doing it this way, you remove some of the chlorine in your water and the amount of other dissolved gases in the water will be reduced too if they are present. You will need to mix ...


4

Domestic rabbits, are from rabbits native to Europe (Spain and Portugal), they are crepuscular, being most active around dawn and dusk. In the wild, they tend to spend the heat of the day in relatively cool underground warrens. Temperatures above 85F (29C) can be life threatening to them. Optimally a pet rabbit will be kept in an air conditioned home, but ...


4

Consistency is key. You are quite right that a large peak or trough in temperature can have adverse affects on the fish and is sometimes known as temperature shock. You want to do everything you can to avoid large swings in temperature, PH, GH etc because the fish struggle to adapt to it (which also includes water changes - the new water should be as ...


4

A few options at hand: 1) Increase the temperature of your room, can use your regular home heating system, space heaters (do not use unsupervised) etc.. 2) Use hot water bottles (wrapped in a towel to prevent thermal burns) 3) Place tank in a room with lots of natural sunlight beaming through the windows, you can try to place part of the tank in direct ...


4

Temperature is a form of physical energy. It's the same for humans and animals, so any body thermometer for human use is suitable for dogs as well. Since the regulations and requirements for medical products for humans are often higher than those for animals, any thermometer intended for human use should be safe for a dog as well. If you intended to use a ...


4

No, In your case you are using the bag multiple times. Every time you submerge the bag in water you are exposing it to germs. Additionally you would be warming the bag to the perfect temperature for more germs to grow. Single use bags are available; the lactated ringer's bag is inside of another bag that protects it from germs, you could warm it before ...


3

Welcome on Pets! First of, please research what goldfish need for an habitat before you buy the next ones. Wikipedia is good starting point. Please note that common goldfish can grow larger then 16 inches (30cm). Size: You will find in short order that the bowl in the picture is way to small for any fish to live in. Water: If you know that the tap water ...


3

I have consulted the vet they told it was result of heavy cold in this region.


3

It is unlikely that a fish pond would freeze solid and have the gold fish survive. As temperatures drop the fish enter a state of torpor (similar to hibernation). I could not find any reliable references supporting gold fish or koi surviving in a completely frozen pond. The biggest risk to fish wintering over in frozen water is lack of oxygen. The layer ...


3

How long the fish can stay without filtration would depend on the the size of the tank and the bioload of the fish. The bioload of the tank depends on the number of fish and the size of the fish. For instance, a goldfish will create more bioload than a guppy. If you have a large tank and a small bioload. The tank can remain without filtration for many ...


3

My rabbit is sensitive to heat, and sometimes I will wrap an ice pack up in a thin towel, and hold it against her ears. Since a rabbit's ears are used to cool them off, this helps the process speed up.


3

Firstly, you'll probably want to ensure that there is no other way for you to cool your tank before you buy a chiller because an aquarium chiller unit represents a reasonable investment. Indeed, the cheapest reputable chiller I've found was about £100 but they can range vastly some of which are over £600. Have you tried the alternatives? So before you grab ...


3

You might try some of the 40-hour heat packs used for shipping reptiles, which you can get in a pet store or online; you would still have to buy it, but they are not very expensive. Using a floor vent heater in the room is a good idea if the house is cold, but it's a dangerous and tricky game to have it blow right on the tank as a primary heat source-- ...


3

It depends. This very much depends on how you do your water changes. For me, I make RO water and store it outside (which means it's cold). Then I add hot tap water and a dechlorinator solution to remove the chlorine / chloramine and any heavy metals from the water. This is probably not the most energy efficient way to do it but it allows me granular ...


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