7

It is possible that it's a result of teething. Teething with dogs, as with us, can be a painful and uncomfortable experience and for them and, at 5 months, he's probably not finished growing his full adult teeth (usually around 8 months). If this is why, some ice in his water dish may help alleviate the discomfort and you can also try massaging his gums. ...


4

Have lots of things that are appropriate for the puppy to chew like sturdy rubber toys, bones, and you can even give cold carrots. When the puppy shows interest in something that is off limits redirect them to one of the items they should chew. Don't allow the puppy access to places with things they shouldn't chew without supervision, crate training is ...


4

The other answers give helpful advice, and I would like to emphasize a couple of points: Retrievers are very mouthy in general -- they were bred to pick up game in their mouths and bring it back to the hunter. So they tend to play biting games more than many other breeds. Bite inhibition is THE most important lesson a puppy must learn. A two-month-old puppy ...


3

With puppies, they generally don't realize how much they are being hurtful, they don't know their own strength yet. I've had a lot of success in teaching that simply by over-reacting and acting like I'm really, really hurt. 1-3 times doing this and the dog figured it out and stopped. (Note that the dog might not seem to 'care' or be concerned, but a ...


3

Overall, I'm not too fond with the post (or seeing people tying up dogs in general). It might help, but it really depends on the individual dog and your actual situation, I guess. Always keep this in mind: Just because something worked (or didn't work) for someone else, it doesn't mean it's the same in your case. The important part in your situation is ...


3

My German Shepherd is similarly destructive with her toys (luckily only with those and not with stuff that isn't hers). I found that the best toys for her are a rope from the pet shop for playing tug of war and a ball with a hole in it and gills on the inside. You can put treats into the ball and the dog has to roll it around to get the treats out. And ...


2

Consider buying a Recliner Chair for couple hundred bucks. It sure kept my Husky busy for over 3 months! After 3 months: recliner was completely chewn through; all fabric ripped; all corners smoothed; the wood structure that holds whole thing together, took longest as that wood was about 5" thick; eventually, she chewed through that and recliner ...


2

The other answers here are good but another reason may be that he is just not hungry. Puppies often go through phases where they don't need as many calories as they did before. Some breeds are less likely to go through this type of phase but it is a possibility. If the vet doesn't find anything wrong then still offer the food but pick it up if the dog hasn't ...


2

The cited times certainly look familiar to me... Some more timings: pig ham bone: completely gone after about 1.5 h, except a mess of slobber and tiny bone chips. Not recommended (and in case of the organic free-range pig be careful because of pseudorabies). Eating the whole thing leads to an additional long digestive nap. These can be gotten here dried in ...


2

In addition to an existing great answer, I would also suggest trying frozen, raw carrots. A general idea behind this is to freeze a big, fat, juicy carrot and take advantage of its high water content. Water has relatively high enthalpy of fusion - which means that high in water content, frozen products - like vegetables - would require a lot of "effort" (in ...


2

I think there are a lot of good answers here, but I still wanted to add a couple of things. One, I think several of the posters are correct in saying that you should yelp or say "ouch!" loud and sharp and quit playing. That is how puppies socialize with one another. If one plays too hard, the other puppy lets them know this way and quits playing with them. ...


1

If you have decided that feeding rawhide to your dog is appropriate, I don't see why freezing them would be any cause for concern. Many dogs enjoy frozen treats. There are a couple of lines of thought on if rawhide should be feed to a dog at all, these are addressed in our existing question Are rawhide bones or natural raw bones potentially dangerous for a ...


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