13

There are two basic types of substrates for bearded dragons, there are benefits and downsides to both, and it comes down to what you feel is safe for your bearded dragon, and what you feel you can manage for cleaning. In short, particle substrates allow the bearded dragon to dig, which is something they do enjoy doing, but gives a risk of impaction from ...


8

After spending some hours researching, I couldn't find any list of turtle safe materials. The only material I could think about was wood: if it´s too soft, perhaps you turtle could begin to bite it and remove small chips, and could cause some problems. If the wood is chemically treated, the problems with chemicals could be more intense. And if it´s not ...


7

I find EcoEarth (shredded coconut husk) makes a nice substrate. It can be used wet or dry and even in high humidity environments, I've never had any problems with mold. It's not topsoil, but you might find it useful nonetheless. You could also try a mixture of topsoil and coconut husk. This could give you some of the moisture-balancing properties of coconut ...


6

Essentially, for beginners, substrate is purely esthetic. The filtration purposes attained from a deep sand bed or whatever rocks used as a substrate isn't something imperative for the well being of most aquariums. Even more, usually beginners will not be dealing with animals or plants that are dependent on a specific kind of substrate. As for more ...


5

Most likely nothing will happen, the reason for washing the sand is to get rid of the dust (this is for the sand you buy in bags and labeled aquarium sand); this type of sand have been washed and dried using heat, so it is almost sterile. But if you make your own sand/gravel, it is very important to clean it to get rid of bacteria and organic waste. Gravel/...


4

Depends on what you have or want to put in the tank, whether you are wanting to use this as a form of filtration, and what you think looks good. If you want to plant in the substrate you will need at least 1" of substrate. If you have burrowing species, you want this to be 4" or more. Generally with depths of over 2" you need to be careful of anaerobic ...


4

Looking at the opinions of other keepers and internet consultants the safest and most recommended/used substrate for parrot cages is paper. Newspaper and white or brown butcher paper are mentioned on ALL personal sites.


4

You are going to want both ideally. The deep substrate is good for burrowing (which they will do) but not deep enough to cut down on the heat. I would say at least 1 hide and deeper substrate is probably fine but two hides are good for most terrestrial snakes. According to the care sheet sand boas also destroy their environment so dont get a ton of stuff in ...


4

I just wouldn't use the scouring brush, it's meant to be abrasive in order to scrub baked on food off pots and pans so it's a bit overkill in my opinion. Here is my cleaning routine for my bearded dragon's tank, I can't imagine that it wouldn't work for you, since the temperatures in my tank will be about the same as yours if not a little bit hotter. Step ...


4

As trond points out, the dust is the only real problem you get from non-rinsed sand. Even when I've washed sand you still get a small amount of dust because it's very difficult to remove completely. However, be aware that all of this dust has to go somewhere. Once your tank has cleared up you'll want check your filter to ensure that the dust isn't clogging ...


3

It is best to keep the bottom of a pond as clean as possible. You will need to do a spring clean every year to remove the waste like leaves and other stuff. Goldfish are known to dig and to eat plants, so even the flower pots need to be covered by heavy rocks or other types of covering. Also, you need to expect some loss of plants during the summer. It is ...


3

Keep it bare bottom and use pots for any plants that you add to it. Unless the pond is permanent like concrete and I would still be hesitant to suggest it, using a substrate in a pond is unnecessary and can be a complete pain to deal with. There are pots specifically made for pond usage that have slats or holes in them. IME, these are by far the best way to ...


3

You can forget about any layers with goldfish or Koi because they will mix it. Generally plants are put in pots, often with large gravel on top to try to keep the fish from digging. The liner in the figure is generally too shallow for water lillies; about 2 + foot (60 cm) is minimum depth; except for some special miniature types. I put no gravel in my pond ...


3

I have two budgies, one male, one female. Each bird has its own cage because the female tends to bully the male so I give him his own cage. See photo. I use Hagen Vision cages for my budgies. The design has a plastic base which is about 10 cm (4") deep. I fill this base to depth of about 8 cm (3") with clean shredded waste paper i.e. junk mail etc that ...


3

It depends on the fish and depends on the pH. Normally I would say that stability is more important than a specific parameter range and I would still stick to that. I don't think many are going to have a hard time adjusting to a close to neutral pH like 7.5. However, you're talking about wild fish which do not always tolerate drastically changed conditions ...


3

For my first tank I also bought some kind of soil and used it as a layer in the grit. Because the producer said it was very good for the plants and I did not have any experience. Meanwhile I do not use it any longer (and do not know anybody else who uses it...) since it is quite expensive and when I compare my diverse tanks I do not see a big difference. ...


3

Just about any type of aquarium safe gravel or sand will work for a substrate. I find the best to be smaller grain so that uneaten food and waste doesn't accumulate between the grains. I would avoid marine substrates and sands as they are calcium based and will mess with the ph of the tank. One thing to keep in mind is that the filtration is basically ...


3

I have found ground up corn cob (dried) that I found at bimart in the bird section to be a great substrate for my bearded dragons cage. ( I have a open cage wood and chicken wire wrap so air is always circulating. ) its easy clean up cause it acts like kitty little absorbs smells well. When wet it plums up and disolves ( i tried it popped a few in my mouth ...


3

It depends on what you want to have in your tank. If you are housing fish that need a very high pH (cichlids), then it might work. All other fish will probably suffer because the shells are either too sharp or because the pH will become too high. Most people are even trying to lower their pH so adding egg shells will definitely not help with that.


3

Snails need substrate to be "happy" Based on my experience. I's not strictly essential for their survival but snail will bury if they need to lay eggs and if the environment they are in is not ideal (too low moisture, too cold/hot, not enough food). I use store bought coconut fiber as a substrate, it doesn't smell and it retains moisture much ...


3

Ok, so I should update this. I searched around a bit and figured that the only valid concern was that the chicks might eat too much of the bedding and get impacted crops. However there were also reports of compacted crops in cases where the chicks had eaten pine shavings or other bedding types. So I eventually just went ahead and used the sand. The chicks ...


2

Realistically, there is always a risk for impaction when a substrate is present. The risk is highest when the substrate is small rocks that can fit in the turtle's mouth, however, there is an exception when the rocks are large and cannot fit in the turtle's mouth. Admittedly, the smaller rocks are more pleasing to the eye; the bigger rocks are just... ...


2

There's nothing that's going to keep a turtle tank clean except water changes. Even if you introduce another animal to clean up after the turtle, that animal will subsequently produce waste which will end up in the water and the substrate. Fish such as cory catfish or some types of plecostomus might clean up uneaten food, but very few will do anything with ...


2

Cleaning gravel can be tricky, so this is actually a good question. In short- you can leave the fish in the tank- just watch what you put in. But as far as way to clean gravel goes, here are some of my answers: This best approach is, as mentioned before, to look at your tank as an ecosystem. In the natural environment there would be loads of other ...


2

You can orientate at the pH value recommendations for the fish you'd like to have in your aquarium. There's no strict border between acidic and alkaline liquids/water for the well-being of a fish. Values are provided by various sources, like theaquariumwiki.com or literature and if a value is missing you can ask here. You'll notice that most of them have a ...


2

Normally newspaper is what people would use but you can actually buy sandpaper like sheets from the pet store for use with parrot and small parakeet cages. They are brown and about the size of a piece of writing paper (8x11").


2

You said it. Any substrate that can be ingested, especially sand, is not safe for Bearded dragons - no matter the type, quantity, their age or size. Some commercial products, like for example Zoo Med's Excavator, will probably claim that their substrate is safe and "digestible" when ingested, but in my opinion it can still cause problems. I'm not aware of ...


2

Goldfish are gluttonous fish and this can definitely cause problems picking a substrate. Sand and small rocks can be dangerous if eaten, especially a lot of sand over time. I would stick with larger rock, like river rock mix 1/2-1" in diameter or go with glass marbles. Rule of thumb: If the fish's mouth is big enough to fit around any rocks or gravel or sand-...


2

Most breeders raise geckos on tissue but it is not very aesthetic. Since the gecko comes from Pakistani countries so relatively desert environments can be reproduced using a clay substrate. There is also the substrate "desert bedding" (LUCKY-REPTILE-Substrat-Desert-Bedding) which is a mix with sand and clay. This substrate is well suited because once well ...


2

This soil contains large amounts of sphagnum peat moss, which will likely raise the acidity of your tank to a level that will restrict the plants you can grow and may adversely affect your cherry shrimp. Dependent on which state it's being purchased in, it will also contain "processed forest products" or "processed softwood bark" which ...


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