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21

Because the dog is so young, I think it is very likely you can slowly accustom her to urban walking. I think a natural response when you see a small dog cowering or wimpering in fear is to console them, or pet them. This is not an effective way to dissuade fear. It is better to ignore your dog and not feed into its fearful emotions. [see below] I think ...


14

We buy crickets regularly for two frogs, and we have purchased crickets from two local pet stores. Every batch of crickets we have purchased from one of the pet stores is noisy, chirping like crazy. Every batch of crickets we have purchased from the other pet store is essentially silent. As a result, we now only purchase crickets from the store with non-...


14

One thing to keep in mind is to not try to comfort your pet. If you secure your pet by using a gentle voice to calm him, it confirms his fear! You are actually telling your dog that it is normal to be scared. The best thing to do is act normal, completely ignore his fear, talk to him normally, play with him as you would normally do and do not allow him to ...


10

Animals learn behaviours through a mechanism called operant conditioning (see this answer for a quick introduction). Basically, a dog will do whatever works, i.e., if performing a behaviour has previously led to good things happening(TM), it will probably try the behaviour again. If good things happen often* when the behaviour is learned and the dog will ...


10

While both sevargdcg and Salketer provide great advice for how to deal with your dog's anxiety as it occurs, long-term you want to work on lowering your dog's sensitivity to noises. You can buy CDs online that have fireworks and other noises specifically to help desensitise your dogs, but you'll probably find plenty of the requisite noises on YouTube as ...


10

I have had great luck with Thundershirts in calming my pets, both cats and dogs. If that doesn't work, give the dog a safe place to go, like their crate, may provide some relief. Putting the crate in a location away from the external walls may help some as well.


8

You have to clean your house, even if your cat gets a bit scared. Cats in general get over this in a short time. Putting your cat in the bathroom while you clean your room is not a problem, but you need to be sure he has a litterbox, food and water. If you get a cat tree, he will have a place to watch what is going on at the same time as he will feel safer ...


8

Try to break up your problem into a set of small easy steps and work on each one separately. For example, to try and get your dog to overcome the fear of noises from the TV start with the TV set to very low volume. Play a movie, and hang out with your dog, feeding her yummy treats repeatedly. Make sure you start out with a very low volume level, and a very ...


8

So this question got me thinking a lot. I have tried several times to find a reliable research paper on the topic but no success yet. In my opinion there are a few layers to this question. Stress for the cat The way you describe it, there seems to be some stress for your cat when he hears the recorded meows. You describe the hasty eating and that he takes ...


7

There was a trick Cesar Milan (the Dog Whisperer) used to break a puppy of their fear of living in an urban environment: hold their tail up. When dogs are afraid, their tail tends to go between their legs and their heads bow down. When they're comfortable with their surroundings they'll put their tails upward. Simply (well, not so simply with a dachshund) ...


7

I've seen on the "Dog Whisperer" that dogs can sense the anxiety that an owner has. The first thing you need to be aware of is your own anxiety when walking your puppy. As far as your puppy goes, its still a puppy, so fear isn't too unnatural. You will want to acclimate it to walking in urban areas by first training it to walk on a leash well. That means ...


7

I believe you are referring to a Riddex plug-in device. I used to own one, and used it in my apartment where I lived with a dachshund. The instant I plugged the device in, a spider appeared on the wall from a vent, and crawled away down the hall. This proved to me that the device actually did "something" to justify the manufacturer's claim. My dog, a ...


6

In addition to other answers, a major concern should be the ability to maintain control of your dog. Do not use one of the retractable string/cord leashes which are contained in a plastic distributor handle. Purchase instead a strong, six-foot leash. This type of leash will not only give you proper control, but will prevent a potential issue with nervous ...


6

Cats wave their tails for many reasons. Other aspects of what it does with its tail and its general body posture can help inform what is the exact reason it's waving it. How intensely is it waving its tail? Is it rather slow and gentle? Or is it waving it hard enough to thump against things, and rather quickly? Is it mostly the tip of the tail that's ...


6

The Physical Theory dB is the scientific symbol for Decibel [A] unit of measurement used to express the ratio of one value of a power or field quantity to another, on a logarithmic scale. And The decibel is commonly used in acoustics as a unit of sound pressure level. Well, that doesn't sound useful at first... but it helps us understand a few things. ...


4

My dog is a very disobedient 3-month-old puppy. He howls at the Jeopardy song at a certain spot every time, while completely ignoring almost all other television sounds. I have not rewarded the behavior ever and, in fact, she did it spontaneously on her own the very first time she heard it, when I wasn't even in the room. She does it every time the final ...


4

I had these in every room in the house. My dog began slowly to show signs of discomfort, teeth chattering and started to jump with movements around her. It was getting worse. I took her to the vet to check her teeth and also a full check over. He found nothing. Then one evening it occurred to me it maybe the plugs so I turned them all off. It has been ...


4

This is a form of manipulation. I can think of more cruel things. It doesn't sound to be causing harm to the cat especially in the case with the veterinary. At least no more harm than the harm of domesticating an animal (in case you consider that harmful or beneficial). Whether you feel comfortable doing so with your personal philosophy is another topic. I ...


3

I have a non-ultrasonic humidifier, which I have used and never got even a curious glance at it from my cat. Recently, I purchased a new fancy ultrasonic one, which from the moment I turned it on, (making no discernably irritating noise to my human ears) attracted the curiosity of my cat such that I have never seen before! She spends a lot of time staring at ...


3

Considering the lack of data on ultrasonic cat repellants, I doubt a google search will give you much information regarding ultrasonic humidifiers. Instead let's look at what we can find and try to be deductive. Here is an abstract (full article behind paywall) detailing the results of a study on one brand of cat repellants. The abstract shows an efficacy ...


3

Disclaimer: Unfortunately, I could not find any scientific sources or studies on this, so my answer is purely speculative and not necessarily correct - merely an opinion. I also use these sounds to goad my cat sleep with me. I can see that he gets unsettled, as there are dangerous territorial cats around that he cannot see, but it usually takes five ten ...


2

As you specifically asked for possible medications, a possible solution is to use alprazolam, aka. Xanax. There is a whole appendix dedicated to its use in cases like storm phobias in Karen Overall's book "Manual of Clinical Behavioral Medicine for Dogs and Cats". A (partial) quote of interest, from "Generalized Guidelines for Using Alprazolam for Noise ...


2

Hoo boy, that's a fair-sized chapter in my copy of the Manual of Clinical Behavioral Medicine for Cats and Dogs... Having said that, there are both medicinal and non-medicinal options to trying to treat noise-based anxiety in dogs. Since I'm not a vet, I'm going to totally avoid medicinal options and mention some behavioral ones. Having said that, it would ...


2

Yes, your dog can "sense" thunder. Simple science is behind this intelligence of picking up weather conditions by dogs. Dogs are capable of sensing the barometric pressure drop and any shift in static electric field. Change in air pressure and electricity are indications of adverse weather. As quoted by this article They can also sense the atmosphere'...


2

Treats and slow introduction into areas where these noises occur. First practice the recall, always treat her when she comes to you when you call. Then take her somewhere where the noise she doesnt like is very far away, to the point where she might hear it but not feel threatened, then treat her. Slowly move closer to the noise and treat her as you do ...


2

Chirping could mean many things, mourning for a friend, hungry, or just wants your companionship. He could even be communicating with birds outside


2

Usually you would start the process in, say, early summer. It’s a gradual desensitization, where you introduce one scary thing at a time, keep as much distance as necessary and decrease that distance very carefully and slowly. The goal is to never let her be really scared, pay attention to the little stress signs and body language. If she’s uncomfortable for ...


2

I agree with the other answers that personal ethics and philosophy come into play here, but I would also like to point out your responsibility towards your cat. You took him in (hopefully) to give him a good life. To me, a good life means a life without any unnecessary stress. In the cases where you use it to get your cat to the vet, I can see some value to ...


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