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11

Stertor, also known as snoring, isn't as common in cats as with dogs, but there are no obvious age/breed/sex patterns to it and it's well known, though being overweight can exacerbate the condition. In general, there are surgical treatments for it (not surprising, the same is true for us), but if they're not distressed and generally healthy, I wouldn't be ...


7

I have had experience with snoring dogs. When I exercise my dogs all day, especially right before bed, they tend to be so outrageously tired that they snore all night (but not too loudly that it keeps me up). My advice is to not exercise him extensively before bed, give him like an hour or so of rest. This way, when he sleeps, he isn't as tired when it is ...


2

The medical term for difficult or labored breathing, when it appears to cause discomfort in animals, is dyspnea. Signs of this include: restlessness and poor sleep reluctance to exercise sneezing or other nasal discharge signs of anorexia (not eating) and lethargy Some causes include: Injury or illness, stress Several diseases Nasal obstructions Abscesses ...


2

Yes rabbits can snore. The 7 exotic vets I've seen at "Angel Memorial" and 2 in my local rabbit rescue group "Sweet Binks" describe this as normal. They often further generalize that rabbits with flatter faces like lop eared and some lion head breads have a genetic defect (which is why their face is flat) that leaves them with less developed sinuses which ...


2

I know it has been some time since this question was posted, but for others seeking similar answers, I would get a chest xray for the rabbit. I have had two rabbits with thymoma, which vets often say is very rare, but it is not so rare anymore. The vets just thought my rabbit had a respiratory issue, until I requested an xray and they found the chest tumor. ...


1

I have had several cats that snore. It sometimes gets worse with age. A dramatic change might be due to a serious medical cause - like a cold. But since you have checked that out, I wouldn't worry about it.


1

I already awarded the answer, but wanted to add some additional details based on my conversation with the House Rabbit Society (HRS): HRS, suggested I reduce respiratory stress by mitigating the amount of dust the bunny is exposed to. Specifically, they mentioned finding a hay that is less dusty. Unfortunately, this isn't likely to help my particular ...


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