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61

This seems pretty standard for a kitten that was separated from her mother and siblings maybe a bit too young. 6 weeks old used to be the standard age to send kittens to new homes, and it won't hurt your kitten long-term, but it can produce this sort of mourning period. These days, 8 weeks old is the recommended age for re-homing, after they are ...


57

Fostering is a great way to see if you're ready to commit to a dog, contact your local rescues to see what kind of dogs are available. The perks with fostering are: 1) You're helping a dog in need. 2) You do not need to keep the dog or find it a new home if you decide it's not for you. 3) Shelters typically provide all food and vet care, no cost to you. ...


32

6 weeks is way too young to be separated from her mother. Unless there is an emergency reason, I strongly suggest returning this kitten to her mother for at least another 6 weeks. Good breeders typically give kittens away at around 14 weeks. There are many important things she still needs to learn from her mother, and she is clearly distressed by the ...


30

I don't know specifically about England, but here in Germany, many pet shelters are looking for volunteers who (regularily) take dogs for a walk. Even if they might not have your specific breed available, interacting with different dogs will teach you a lot about them, and it will allow you to check if you're really that enthusiastic about the daily care a ...


16

Other answers are good. One thing you might not have thought of is to go on a walk for an hour every morning and an hour every evening. See how you feel after doing this for a month. Don't allow yourself to miss a session. Can you see yourself sticking to that regime for the next decade rain or shine?


13

First we want to know that you have thought about your pets medical needs. And your vet probably has a pretty good idea of how you treat your pets. Do you bring them in for regular check ups, get them vaccinated, and provide heartworm prevention treatment regularly? When they come it are they clean well groomed, and not showing signs of neglect? Your vet ...


13

You should take your new pet to your vet for a healthy pet check up, regardless of where you got it. Many shelters (all that I work with) will have vet checked your pet as part of the intake and maintenance of the animal as part of their program. All the shelters in my area have vets on staff as full time positions, in my opinion shelter pets are more ...


13

At least in the US it is normal practice for pets to leave with all relevant vaccines (as well as neutering and routine medical care like deworming). All of the shelters in my area do this, and two are part of national organizations. @mhwombat notes in a comment that this is also true in Ireland and the UK. More specifically, your new pet will have ...


13

I don't know if it varies from area to area, but I believe that 'Open Door' implies that the shelter accepts any animal, any time of the day in pretty much any condition. Limited access shelters might not take certain kinds of animals, or animals with what appear to be serious health or behavioral concerns. They can also accept certain kinds of animals, but ...


13

You should definitely ask before just showing up with a pet in tow. The answer will probably depend on the type of pet. My local shelter arranges "meet and greet"s for dogs, so it's probably possible for your dog to meet a potential adoptee dog. Cats really don't do well out of their homes (and I notice that they don't have feline "meet and greet"s). For ...


13

Many foster agencies will let you let you take a dog for Monday - Friday and then decide. They want to place the dog in a good fit. Within a breed personalities differ. I would base the decision more on the dog.


12

My local animal shelter maintains a list of wanted items on its web site. (Perhaps yours does too!) Some themes from that list: new toys, collars, and litter pans durable equipment (not required to be new): leashes, beds, heating pads, nail clippers, pens, etc towels, blankets, and small rugs food (check with your shelter for any specific requests about ...


12

You know you have a stable home life and are ready to adopt, but they don't know that. With same-day adoptions at least some people would adopt on a lark ("hey honey, I got us a puppy!"), which usually does not go well for the pet. Further, the shelter might be using that time to check with your landlord (if you rent) and/or your vet to make sure that you'...


12

Act soon on hydration. Dehydration is a big worry - they don't have much in the way of reserves. We nearly lost two after taking them home at barely 6 weeks (we were told 8 but I believe the vet rather than the seller). They ended up needing IV fluids and the early illness could have contributed to the health problems one of them had later. A lot of sleep ...


11

I volunteer at an SPCA, and they have a pet "wish list" that accepts applications for a specific breed. Of course, there is no guarantee of a time frame when that breed will be available; it all depends on what comes through the intake door. Check with shelters in your area to see if they offer this service. There are also many breed-specific rescue groups ...


11

A couple of things to be aware of with a meowing kitten: 1) If they are an oriental breed like a siamese, they will be very chatty with you. My oriental shorthair has a large vocabulary of meows at this point, so if the meowing bothers you and it's an oriental breed, you should keep that in mind. 2) Cats meow for the same reason that babies cry: food, ...


10

It is possible, if you are patient, and are willing to take on a purebred that does not have papers. Because of the nature of rescues it is basically impossible to document the actual origins of the dogs. In October our rescue organization All Herding Breed Dog Rescue of Illinois (Shameless plug sorry) rescued 8 pure bred pointer puppies that had been ...


10

As others have already stated, you'll definitely want to look at organisations that are looking for volunteers for both fostering but also dog walking. For example, The UK's Blue Cross have a scheme which allows you to walk their dogs for them. I would definitely look at this option even if you think you're already set on your dog breed. I was absolutely ...


9

Usually the rescue organisation's fees include the cost of spaying or neutering, vaccinations, microchip, and perhaps more. For example, here's what the adoption costs for the ASPCA adoption centre in Manhattan include: The ASPCA Adoption Center offers you and your new animal companion the following: Benefits A leash and collar or cardboard pet ...


9

Do perfect animals exist ?… Anyway, there are many reasons an animal may end in a shelter without necessarily having "issues". Here are the top ten reason from some statistics gathered by the National Council on Pet Population Study and Policy¹, in the US: Dogs Moving (7 %); Euthanasia, illness (7 %); Landlord not allowing pets (6 %); Cost (5 %); ...


9

In my (limited) experience, typical areas of questioning include: About the home environment: Do you own or rent? How long have you lived there? How many people live there and what are their ages (particularly children)? Past and current pets: Do you have any pets now? Tell us about them. (Oh, and are they neutered?) Have you had pets in the past? What ...


9

Basics The first thing to realise is that any pet you rescue has likely been neglected and possibly abused. This can lead to some short and long term behavior issues. It is the foster's job to help the pet recover. We may have been lucky, but it has taken us a few weeks of extra work and attention to get them on the road to becoming a good pet. It's also ...


9

Years of experience of taking in second hand dogs here - I quickly gave up trying to deal with the sort of private shelter you apparently want to get a dog from. Many of them treat you with a degree of suspicion, you have to fill out five pages of paperwork, they insist on inspecting your home, charge huge amounts for what are now often unsocialized, ...


8

Most communities have at least one "open door" or open admission shelter. This usually means they accept all lost and stray animals, regardless of breed, age or health. Many communities also have limited admission shelters which usually describe themselves as "no kill" because it sounds better. Most no kill shelters can be no kill because they limit ...


8

This probably depends on the type of facilities that the shelter has, but in my experience you can take as much time as you need to get to know your potential pet, and visiting the pet a few times before you make up your mind is quite normal. There's probably a play room where you can get acquainted. If you're adopting a dog, you may be able to take it for a ...


7

At the Shelter Many rescue organizations have a shelter where they can keep rescued animals that are either difficult placements, need extra attention and training, and sometimes just because they do not have a home yet. These shelters are alot of work and are often primarily run by a very skeleton crew (often just a very few people). There are lots of ...


7

https://www.borrowmydoggy.com/ is a website that allows just this - you can get matched with local dog owners to give their dogs walks. It's potentially a simpler starter than fostering. I've not used it personally, but some friends have (as dog owners) and love it.


7

According to a site I reference frequently for pet questions, "The Spruce Pets", kittens of that age should be fed an average of 4 times a day...with moist kitten food or dry kitten food moistened with cat milk replacement formula. Weighing the kitten frequently will also give a good gauge on their development. If they are the sole cat using the litter ...


6

So, first, kudos to you for doing a very good thing! So many people think they can release rabbits to the wild and these rabbits have no natural defenses, so it's a death sentence. Thank you for the rescue! In any event, you're doing pretty much all the right things. In terms of immediate food/care: Timothy hay (any pet store) Some fresh veggies like ...


6

I can't find one and it might be something you could start if you believe in the cause. However, I don't see it as being a feasible option, in the way you probably mean it. There are currently so many animals without homes that they can't keep them in the shelters they currently have. They have to destroy many, many animals that could have a good home life, ...


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