9

Generally speaking, you can't control the shedding since it needs to happen. The best preventative measure you can take is to brush/groom the dog regularly to ensure that the old hair is removed. For dogs that get seasonal coats, it is important to groom them more frequently during the times their new coat is coming in. For dogs that continually shed (...


8

Some areas where pets can be found often may have odor associated with them, even if your pets are well groomed. There are different ways to make your clothes smell good without washing them, and to keep your closet smelling fresh. PetMD also has a good article on how to rid your whole house of dog smell, which will help with your clothes as well. ...


7

Most of this is what I remember from my old biology classes, so the usual caveats apply. Animals shed their fur for the same reason we shed hair: older, less healthy hair falls away and gets replaced by new growth. The more hair there is, the more of it gets shed - which is the same for us as it is for our pets (I have long hair, and I "shed" a LOT more ...


7

If he isn't pulling his own fur out and you aren't pulling enough to leave bare patches, I'd say there's no harm to it, particularly for a cat with a thick coat in a hot dry region. It would feel to him a bit like a brisk massage, and encourage circulation - which helps to keep the temperature regulation system working - so that would be why he adores it so ...


6

kratzallergy.com says: If the rabbit also causes an allergy, you might consider a smaller pet. A guinea pig is a fairly safe bet for most people with allergies. If you find that a regular guinea pig causes some allergy symptoms, you might opt for a hairless guinea pig. Hairless guinea pigs actually do have hair that some people call peach fuzz. The lack of ...


6

Even though he no longer has eyes it is still ideal that all shed be removed. Retained shed can cause avascular necrosis which can lead to sloughing of the skin and osteomyelitis of the underlying bone (mainly with digits). There is a chance that the retained shed may come off during his next shed cycle. In the meantime provide a humidity box with peat moss ...


6

Continuously (if slowly) shed and replaced; nothing to worry about. I'm always amused by finding a whisker; I forget just how long they are compared to the cat until I have one without the cat attached, and I find it interesting to ponder how that would scale up if large cat's whiskers were the same relative length.


5

If you brush or comb the cat (which many cats enjoy, if done gently), that will gather a lot of the loose fur, and leave her looking and feeling silkier too. Of course you and the immediate surroundings are going to get rather furred in the process, though doing this often caN limit how much is scattered at a time. But a furry pet sheds fur. Some breeds ...


4

What do I do? Leave it be, use a layer of paper towel as substrate to prevent dirt from getting into the area causing infection. Keep her moist hide always fresh, dampen it daily. Tupperware container (hole cut in for an entrance) with soaked paper towel or peat moss works great. If you see her in process of shedding again increase the humidity in her ...


4

You are right to suggest that shedding in cats, dogs and other animals (both domestic and wild) are closely linked to seasonal variations: Shedding in animals is intimately related to seasonal cycles. In most cases, the cycle of shedding is cued by changes in the amount of daylight. Hair growth and shedding are regulated by fluctuations in the amount of ...


4

Given that the amount of shedding is normal, I don't think there's anything you can do to lessen it. However, you can somewhat reduce the amount that ends up on you, by grooming him frequently. Most cats love being groomed, so it will be a bonding experience for both of you. Start slowly, a little bit at a time, so he can get used to it. To remove the ...


4

Leopard Geckos shed throughout their entire lives, the reason you do not see the shed is because they eat it! Once full grown they shed less regularly (this varies from species to species). Healthy geckos will have their full shed within 24 hours, it is always a good idea to regularly check their extremities to ensure that there is no remaining shed.


3

With the disclaimer I am not a vet, but from your description, I do get the impression the shedding could be stress related, specifically due to these points: It visibly increases in specific situations. Normal shedding is usually pretty consistent, with an exception for if the cat is being petted or groomed, which tends to pull out loose hairs. The cat ...


3

In my experience cats shed the same amount of fur after they are spayed/neutered. I have had cats that have been unneutered and unspayed and i have not seen any difference in the amount of shedding after they have been spayed/neutered,Not even when the cats have been exposed to the stress of getting a new home where an other cat was living. Cats do normaly ...


3

Assuming that your longhaired cat is healthy - and is having no dietary issues, I’d say that you are doing just fine. Few people with longhaired cats are happy aout the quantities of hair that they shed, but it’s just part of the package that comes with being a cat’s parent. Because of the time spent grooming your cat, it’s likely that you are more likely ...


2

In hot weather months, you can reduce shedding and help the cat handle the heat by cutting the hair short - to the skin (lion cut) or about the length of a short haired cat (teddy bear cut). Regular brushing helps. A way to keep hair off your clothes is to keep a towel handy and put the cat on the towel on your lap.


2

Shedding and Molting (or moulting) are very similar, both mean to lose all or part of a covering of hair or skin. For rabbits (and other mammals) shedding is generally considered less pronounced than molting. Speaking from experience I can tell you that a pet rabbit will be shedding a small amount of hair on pretty much constant bases, just like you see ...


2

My gecko's tail recently did this. Her shedding process didn’t go as planned and her shedding skin stayed on half her tail for two days. I noticed an open flesh wound, so I grabbed her tail and she just looked up at me. I didn’t know how it was going to turn out, but I started to bend it and it came off. Alza seemed very happy that I did this. She was in ...


2

Often if a dog gets shaved for surgery or something like that, the hair won't grow back until the next "shedding cycle" (I'm sure there is a more scientific word for that). I think this is only for dogs like retrievers that have fur, compared to something such as poodle that has to get hair cuts all the time. I would be patient and I am hopeful it will grow ...


1

The only thing I can attribute that to is stuck shed I'm afraid. Do you have a hygrometer to measure humidity with? Not having stuck shed on toes isn't really the best way of measuring the humidity. Them sleeping on the cold side and spending the night on the warm side is normal so don't worry about that. Really though, if it keeps happening I'd say take him ...


1

There's a lot going on here. The causes could honestly be anything you listed. The individual incidents could also exacerbate the others - i.e. the tail being stood on could make the shed worse etc. Geckos effectively have to be in a life or death situation to drop the tail and therefore I feel the most likely scenario was the other lizard caused it - either ...


1

I've had a multiple breed of dogs throughout my life, and most of them keep changing their colors with time. Your dog may or may not go back to the exact shade he was before, rather he may develop a new mix of colors. It is always surprising to see what new colors emerge on their fur from time to time.


1

This is fairly normal, Huskies (among) are double coated dogs. Breeds like German Shepherds, Akitas, Malamutes, Newfoundlands etc also have them, mainly working dogs bread for harsh working conditions. This means there is an additional coat you don't normally see, unless you go looking, it is shorter than the common white/grey/black coat you see, this is ...


1

It sounds like you have taken most of the steps recommended to minimise shedding. These are (for reference): Regular grooming: brushing will remove some or most of the loose hair Improving diet: dogs may have allergies to a certain food causing them to shed more. Higher quality food means better skin which means less shedding even without possible allergies....


1

One thing that will help is bathing your cat. Some people freak out about this, but I bathe my cat a few times a year. He's an indoor/outdoor cat. He likes to roll in the dirt and most of the time he cleans it off, but sometimes he's just dirty or mangy looking. Then or when he's shedding, a good bath will help him enormously. Not only does it get a lot of ...


1

To reduce the amount of fur a cat malts over your furniture and clothes you could try a deshedder brush. I have four cats and use one of these; two love it and the other two hate it. As this is my first post I'm not sure if I can share the brand here but you can search online shops for this tool. They're not usually cheap for a decent one.


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