14

You're going in the right direction, with your efforts to make the couch unappealing, and provide scratchers as alternatives. You just need to experiment a bit more to discover the right combination of things to discourage it from the couch and encourage it to the scratchers. Since the blankets aren't working, try a different method to discourage the cat. ...


12

I totally understand your frustration. Cats are very independent, complex creatures. I imagine your cat is very happy, you’re providing it everything I would suggest and then some. Seriously, give yourself some kudos for that. I have a few thoughts that may help: Firstly, cat ownership does require a certain level of “letting go”. When I got my cat, I was ...


8

1. Kittens are generally playful We recently got three cats. When they joined our family, they were 8 months, 8 months and 5 months old. All of them were still childishly playful, and have been for months after. For a 16wk old kitten, I'm expecting it to remain this playful for at least a couple of months. Since you've already bought toys and such for ...


6

Yes. You need to ignore it. If necessary buy ear plugs. She needs to learn that scratching the door does not yield anything. Be consequent. Even opening the door once will teach her that if she scratches the door will open so she will try again. Be patient. Never open the door, don't talk through the closed door, etc. just completely ignore it. I'd also ...


5

First, recognize that cats have different scratching preferences. They can prefer particular materials, orientations, and locations. If you get a few scratchers and she doesn't use them, don't give up! Look for scratchers with different characteristics and give those a try. You'll probably have the best success if you start with scratchers similar to what ...


4

Your best option is to work with your cat's instincts, rather than against them. Cats have an instinct to scratch so you need to provide suitable objects for them to scratch on that are more attractive than your furniture. Buy (or make) several scratching posts, bait them with catnip, and place them around the house. Cats like to scratch when they wake up, ...


4

Okay, I'll try to answer all of your questions to the best of my ability. 1) I think the most effective technique is something which is, I believe, called "Behavior Extinction". I may have heard it wrong, but the principle is that you get your cat to quit waking you up or meowing for food, by completely ignoring that behavior. I can tell you from personal ...


4

There are purpose-built pill capsules for cats, even the smallest size should easily fit a 0.35 ml dose. Although you have the choice between different flavours, an additional pill gun might also come in handy.


4

This behavior shows that it got scared by something. It can happen while playing, or of a noise, or if it got hit (or hit itself). Before you start worrying, don't. My cat hit himself as he tried to run through a closed door when he got scared while playing. The vets assured me it will take time for this to pass. He started to avoid the room and place where ...


4

Sounds very much like cat behaviour, and nothing too alarming, although the excessive scratching is a bit of a worry. Cats do vary a lot and do strange things. Mine will sit in a corridor and stare at the wall a few inches away, sometimes he will dart in and out of the room, sometimes he will scratch me as he wants food. I walk him to his bowl (which is full)...


4

Kittens need a lot of play. Play with him until he refuses to play anymore. Use only toys, never your hands, so scratching/biting you will not be reinforced. Lure toys or laser pointers are the safest. Keep trying to play with him regularly throughout the day. Clip his claws regularly. If you need to, take him to a groomer to get them done. You might want to ...


3

I would recommend watching him next time he is let out to determine if any scratches are on purpose or accidental. Some cats will use wood to scratch, but I've never seen cats use wood that's finished and sealed (as I assume your floors and countertops are). So, it COULD be on purpose, but I suspect it's accidental. If it is on purpose, the same type of ...


3

We have a cat with a similar condition, which turns out to be allergic dermatitis. While it could be a different issue for your cat, food allergies often impact their skin and it can be relatively easy to find out if that's the case. Some of the more common food allergens in cats includes chicken and grains, amongst others, common in many standard food ...


3

A cat has no concept of a scratching post, i.e. for a cat everything is a scratching post if it is not wet, hard as stone or crying when being scratched. Scratching serves at least three different purposes. marking of territory. scratching marks are visible to other cats. Additionally pheromones from the paws are applied at the scratching marks stress ...


3

Your country actually helps a lot. USA is known to almost fully eradicate rabies in urban and suburban regions, while it still exists in wild. Apparently, there are 1-3 cases a month in the whole country per year. Another thing that makes you safe is that it wasn't a deep wound, it was a scratching, most of which is absorbed by your jeans. The normal ...


3

Make very sure the cat has a legal scratcher they know how to scratch. Every cat knows how to scratch a rope wrapped pole as long as the pole is as high as the cat standing; some cats can do with less but not too willingly. The cat must scratch regularly and the only question is what to scratch. Reward the cat for "correct scratching" every time ...


3

How damaged is your couch now? If it needs a re-cover then cut the old cladding off, and fit that fabric to your existing cat scratch posts. Choose some significantly different fabric to reclad the rear/sides/front of your couch and keep the couch elsewhere like a garage while doing the work. This will give the cat time with the couch-fabric covered ...


2

I've had good luck with putting cardboard scratchers right next to the furniture they are scratching and rubbing some catnip into the pores of the cardboard. This makes it appealing from a smell perspective, and entices the cat to scratch there rather than your furniture. Some furniture is unfortunately too enticing; I've had to replace some furniture with ...


2

In addition to all of the suggestions posted here, I'd also like to point out that it may be cat acne from her own oils/dander/et cetera from things such as food & water bowls (the most likely culprits) as well as bedding/towels/so on that she frequently sleeps on or rubs against. This is different than being allergic to the material itself; instead, it'...


2

As many people with allergies will tell you - they can get worse if you keep getting in contact with the triggers. Also, allergies or intolerances can develop later in life and don't have to be a 'from birth to death' thing. Some cats can be intolerant or allergic when it comes to grains, potatoes, certain types of protein or the specific thickener that is ...


2

It's a possible allergy sign, have you tried changing food? Not sure what you're feeding her now, but you could try cutting out different food items to see if you can spot the source and/or put her on a rice-based diet. Another possibility there is the bedding, also something to consider changing up. If you're using wood, consider dropping it for something ...


2

The itching could be caused by any number of things. You cat may also just have had an itchy ear and scratched it too hard, cutting herself a bit. People do this all the time too. Inspect the ear daily. If after 3 days it is not healing or it looks redder or is oozing lymph/pus or bleeding or the crusty scab (clot) is getting bigger take your cat to the ...


2

In my experience if you block off the area with something as simple as cardboard before the rabbit decides the place is nice, you can redirect them easily. Where we have cabinets/dressers that the rabbit can get under. I take out the bottom drawer and use a stapler to attach a piece of cardboard on the inside. Once the rabbit has decided it is home, you ...


2

You could try setting up a baby gate to keep the dog from approaching the door, but you may then find that the dog sits behind the gate and barks instead, but it's worth a try. You could let the dog into the bedroom with your wife when you get up. He'd probably prefer being with her to being with you, assuming that he's not allowed access to the bedroom ...


2

You seem like you are doing all the right things. A couple extra things you could try: MOVE THE CAT TREES: Make sure one or two of their cat trees are located in the area where you spend the most time. If you have already done this, sometimes just moving the cat tree a meter from where it was makes it suddenly more interesting to the feline mind. ...


2

You say ... the easy thing to do is leave the door open I'm saying, it's not only the easy thing, it's the only thing! Those of us fortunate to have cats in our home give up some things...one of those things is the right to keep an inside door closed (when a person is behind it)...ever. Regardless of this, here are some things that may help you... ...


2

Scratching is a natural territorial behavior. Cats may scratch more if they're bored, but it's something they'll do anyways as part of the normal routine. Cats have different preferences for scratching material, scratching position, and location. If there is a specific spot the cat is scratching, physically block it with a scratcher, so it has no choice ...


2

Buy another scratching post, this one should be more expensive than the first one. Then he will start using the cheap scratching post. Jokes aside, you can't tell a cat what to do. What has helped me over the years is, putting some catnip over the post, so it feels more appealing to the cat. Also, try scratching the post yourself and whenever he uses it, ...


2

Step # 1 If your cats allergies are that severe we really need to figure out whats causing the problem and to soothe the inflammation in the meantime. This will have to be done with your DVM. Step # 2 We don't put plastic e-collars on our cats instead we have a softer solution - we use EZ Soft E-collars, they are made with fabric so the cat doesn't feel the ...


2

I'm not confident enough to diagnose the cat, but my thoughts were too long to stay in the comments. I think very much sounds like a food allergy - itching and skin issues are the first and most common sign of food allergy. Check also the cat's bowel movements for any oddities (straining? too frequent?). Food allergies are almost impossible to test for, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible