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28

If I were in your shoes, I would not let the cat go outside. It is just my personal opinion based on safety, though - and I'm saying this as a person who thinks that indoor cats are indeed missing an important, but non-essential aspect of their lives. Also, I tend to get deeply bonded with all the pets I'm taking care for, maybe too much, or maybe not - thus ...


22

Buy a cat harness and take him out on supervised walks on a leash. Cat harnesses are a simple, affordable method for a cat owner to take their cat outdoors and let them explore in a safe, supervised fashion, and also minimize the risk that they'll kill innocent wild animals. Just put it on him periodically around the house to get him used to it, then attach ...


16

It is not necessarily a bad idea if you take the necessary precautions. A cat who used to wander freely outside knows the dangers and pitfalls of the outside. However, you need to take some precautions. Have your cat carry an easy break collar with your phone number on it. Have your cat microchipped. Have your cat vaccinated. Some people don't vaccinate ...


13

The previous answers are great, and I agree that there are many dangers for the safety of outdoor cats. Here is another reason I would not let my own cat roam freely outdoors: Domesticated cats are considered by many ecologists to be super-predators -- i.e., they kill many birds, many more than they eat, seemingly just for sport. Here's just one link to an ...


8

Letting your cat wander outside unsupervised is dangerous to his health. Never letting him outside will reduce his quality of life, perhaps drastically. Luckily, these aren't your only options. Your best bet is a third option: let your cat outside in a supervised or controlled fashion. You have several options to let your cat explore outside relatively ...


3

All cats need to hunt capture and kill, but this does not mean they need to hunt live prey; your cat will do fine if the hunting behaviour is satisfied by hunting toys. Hunting and eating birds poses a risk for your cat; birds do very often carry intestinal parasites like worms, and birds are a common source of Salmonella. Eating birds does not pose a ...


2

I haven't been able to find any studies on the effects of poor air quality on animals, but I was able to find quite a bit of general guidance. The American Veterinary Medical Association says this (and the guidance is very similar to other sources): As irritating as smoke can be to people, it can cause health problems for animals as well. Smoke from ...


2

I have grown to grudgingly accept that cats will be cats. As your cat has been used to freely wandering outside in the countryside, I think you should be considering this fact the most. He has experienced the outdoors, and knows the existence of 'outside'. I don't think it is really possible to undo this. The cat may forever yearn for what is out there. ...


1

Cats do love the outdoors, but letting one run free in an urban environment could be more dangerous to them than any good it might do. But there are alternative ways to let your cat experience some of its outdoor cravings. Opening a window with a screen on it is one simple thing you could do - even just letting them breathe in and see the outdoors could be ...


1

NO! Been there done that with tame and feral cats. My experience is that the feral cat will end up badly. The tame cat would do well if you were in a house. I suspect that living in an apartment would make it unworkable, but I have not had that situtation yet.


1

Someone suggested using a shock-collar. I think it is worth saying why this is a bad idea. First of all there is the question of cruelty that others have mentioned but I'll mention some practical reasons. If you are anywhere near a road, the cat may simply run into the road through fright at the first shock. Thus it may get run over on the first test. The ...


1

C.Koca gives some good advice about collar and stuff. But I support that pets are not toys. They have their own personality and lessons to learn in life. If their faith is to die early (unlikely for a cat anyway), so be it. You don't lock-up your children at home because of all the dangers? Also I would recommend letting him out early rather than later. As a ...


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