7

This answer assumes you have a deep sand bed (photos) in your aquarium. When you cycle your aquarium, it means all your micro-fauna are being built. The lower part of the sand bed should already have some anaerobic bacteria living in it. I'm not sure that it's already built up in 3 weeks, but surely it is on its way. When you move items to a new aquarium, ...


4

It is a caulerpa algae, although it has roots, stems and leaves ( may be prolifera or floridiana ). Tangs, Moorish Idols and other fish eat it. It grew very vigorously in my aquariums and so can shade or choke out corals IF not trimmed. In a 75 and a 55 I grew enough to supply a couple independent pet shops. As you note, it should look very bright green.


4

No need to worry. pH is affected by an almost immeasurable amount of factors. Something as benign as turning on a ceiling fan can measurably alter the pH on a tank due to CO2 concentration in the air or degassing in the tank. Just an example on my main reef tank: On the 21st, we turned the air conditioner back on and you can see the average pH go up just ...


3

Lots of things can go wrong. Here are some ideas: pH or ammonia spike : The larger the tank, the less likely spikes are, but all of my catastrophic failures like this were due to spikes Power outage : If the power went out, all electrical components would stop functioning, like the heater, filter, aerator etc. Feeder malfunction : Especially if you haven't ...


2

The most important thing first: Don't put any creature in the tank at the beginning/before the tank is fully cycled! Providing a time line is nonsense because the cycling can take between 1 and 4 weeks. The phases are sufficiently defined by the ammonia, nitrite and nitrate levels - you understood them correctly as mentioned in your question - no need to ...


2

To cycle a fish tank, you fill the tank with water and gravel and add water conditioner. Then start the pump and heater, let the water heat up. This takes a day or two. After 3-4 days, the water gets cloudy (normaly light grey). Then put a small amount of fish food in your tank (no fish in the tank, plants are OK). You then wait for a week and test the water,...


2

You should have some target amount of salt ppm per gallon of water. This amount will change depending on A: the type of salt, and B: what you actually will have in your tank. API aquarium salt claims its 1/2 tea spoon per gallon. Follow the guide on what ever salt you have, and for what ever animals you have in your tank, but lets use API as a base line. ...


2

There are an infinite number of ways to setup a reef so I won't point to any specific products. I'm also making the assumption that by reef you mean a marine tank with rock, coral displays, inverts, fish, etc. Before I even begin, you need to realize that $1000-$2000 may not get you where you are expecting with a 220 gallon reef tank build. You may be ...


1

Not knowing what type of corals you have (soft vs. hard) this is what I've come up with: If you have a hybrid fixture (metal halides/t5 combo body fixture) you will want them about 6-7" inches from bottom of the bulb to top of the water (most of these that come with legs are 4-6" which is okay but not optimal). If they're two different fixtures (a better ...


1

After disparate results each time I tested with APIs test kits, I decided to switch to Red Sea, you can buy kits for marine care on amazon.com. I'm very happy with the results they produce and they read better and with far smaller error tolerance.


1

I am going to end up adding fish first. My first fish are going to be added right after I get my clean up crew. I searched multiple forums and, as you might expect, it's quite debatable what to add first. Ultimately, it comes down to what you would like to do with your aquarium. Some only grow coral and some, like myself, have mixed reef setups, as well as ...


1

That's not algae, those are diatoms. That is part of the natural cycling process and are usually an indicator of high bacteria if you are dosing carbon (it's feeding on the excess bacteria) or disoolved solids (TDS) in your water. If you are dosing carbon, cut it back slowly (or if using bio-pellets, you might be using too much). For a tank that's not ...


1

It looks like you are missing the stand pipe for the drain. A common design out there is the durso standpipe. You can make one yourself from PVC pipe or buy one from their website. There are other designs out there but this one is supposed to be one of the quieter ones(and the one I'm going to try on my new reef tank).


1

Just as I understand you right, you wonder how much water there should be in the left one on the picture? I would say zero water, it depends on how high your pipe is from the sump. You build it like that so there will be enough big hole so you donĀ“t overfill you aquarium. You will pump water up and it needs to have somewere to go else it will go over your ...


1

My first thought is that your return pump isn't strong enough. The overflow is draining at a faster rate than water is getting pumped back up into the tank. Simple solution is to get a more power pump or to slow down the drainage pipe from the overflow, though that would be more difficult.


1

Addition to rib.usa's answer. I think that typical fish could survive a week without eating. Probably there was a power outage, which stopped all electric devices from operating. The time was long enough all the bacteria in the filter died and the filter became a source of poisonous substances. If the power was reconnected automatically by your utility, ...


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