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10

(This information goes for all social rodents and non-rodents including mice, gerbils, and degus.) This matter is briefly talked about here. While no one knows for sure what, if anything, animals understand about death, rodents do understand absence, as in: my friend is missing. Just as they are happy to see you after a while, they are happy to see ...


8

You need to take him to the vet now. There is no quick answers we can give you on the internet and by the sounds of it, the rat needs attention now. I would always be concerned about issues involving gasping or laboured breathing. You need to act fast and unfortunately, this platform is not built to accommodate emergency support.


7

Rats can eat most things. Read this Rat diet, especially the forbidden foods section. Citrus peel or seeds - Peel never. Seeds definitely not for male rats, can cause cancer. As a side note, never feed apple pips, they contain small amounts of cyanide. Meat bones - a big fat yes, they'll love you for it Stale bread - yes, but not mouldy Tea - mine steal ...


4

In most cases, these symptoms mean choking. Rats are known for stuffing their mouths and eating as fast as they can, and occasionally food gets stuck, or a sticky food such as peanut butter or doughy bread causes a blockage. You should avoid feeding your rat sticky foods. Sometimes, rarely, these symptoms happen because of poisoning - you should make sure ...


4

No, Pine and Cedar are generally considered toxic to Rats (and many small mammals) pine should not be used as bedding by extension they should not be offered as chew toys. There are several home remedies (most don't work) for keeping needles on trees, and you have no idea what methods may have been used on the trees that have been disposed of. In fact ...


4

While waiting for the answers to my questions above I figured I would post this to help in the meantime. If she is showing any symptoms described in this question, then she is indeed choking. It sounds to me like this isn't the case. If not, and taking into account her age, she's probably experiencing mild respiratory distress. All rats have a certain ...


4

With rats, wounds generally look worse than they really are. They very rarely require intervention - though their teeth are impressive, they also have thick fur and skin. Occasional fighting is normal for rats; if it gets more frequent, or it's a case of one rat picking on another, then you may have to investigate further. Generally, you can leave a rat to ...


4

Depending on where you live there may be a third option that you have not mentioned. It would be my first choice. In Pittsburgh we have a local rat rescue Pittsburgh Rat Lovers Club and Rescue check if you have something similar locally. My second choice would be your local shelter, many shelters take all kinds of pets. They may have rats waiting for ...


4

First of all - you're right, this is 100% normal behavior. Blaze didn't enjoy it, but she was simply following her instincts. In fact, it would be more surprising to find a deceased rat that hadn't been eaten, unfortunately. 1) Rats can die suddenly for a myriad of reasons. As prey animals, they are extremely skilled at hiding any injuries or illness, which ...


3

The short answer to this is: the bacteria in the food do not affect the concentration of antibiotics, but there are some antibiotics that are influenced by milk and milk products, so read the information on the package. Some antibiotics are to be given with more fluid than other types.


3

I know this answer is late, but for people who may see this in the future, this is the rat version of "choking"- rats cannot choke because they have no gag reflex. (they are unable to vomit source) They like to stuff as much food as they can in their mouths at once! It can look scary for sure- mouth opening, laying still, stuff coming out of their mouth, ...


3

The ASPCA has a useful list of foods to avoid on their website, and as far as I can tell the information is consistent with what I've learned from vets and other reputable sources. Also see their list of poisonous plants. If there's a specific food that you've received conflicting information about, you might want to ask about that specifically so we can ...


3

Don't move the urine to the litter box, move the box to the urine. Add a second litter box in the new corner. Then basically keep doing what you are doing, cleaning it very frequently to persuade the rats that the other one is a better place to go. Using a second separate litter container makes a thorough cleaning easier, rather than just trying to clean ...


3

If a rat pees on you in small drops, it is to mark its territory and designate what belongs to it as you guessed it. It's a natural behavior for rats, in a group they also pee on each other ... and for him you are part of the social group. It’s like a mark of friendship. However, it is very difficult if not impossible to eliminate as a behavior simply ...


2

Yes, but it's very fatty for them, so I'd recommend in very small amounts ie a couple of licks each. I let mine clean off the lid to a yoghurt pot when I have them. Some probiotic yoghurts are very good for them, but again in small amounts as too much can lead to diarrhoea.


2

You absolutely can. They're tasty and great for keeping their teeth trimmed. Pig's ears are very, very fatty for them though, so bear that in mind. Meal worms are great too, as a tasty source of protein, alive or dried. They can also have other live foods such as crickets etc, though I prefer to only feed these dried as rats tend to stash food and you may ...


2

It could be also that the tail got stuck somewhere between the bars if you have bars in your cage and then was torn off while they were wrestling. Have you found the missing tail somewhere? Have your rats known each other for a long time, like a few months? Because where you introduce a new rat to the group, you have to do it carefully, especially if the new ...


2

My little guy died today. He was 16 months old. It appears he had a massive stroke. It was all over in moments. At 1PM I checked on them and gave them a little banana to snack on. A few hours later I heard a bang from the cage. Blixa was lying on the floor paralysed. I lifted him out and held him, panicking because he was gasping and couldn't move. A minute ...


2

Yes, your laboratory rat can be ill. And there is a very good change that the illness is a form of cancer. Being a laboratory rat does not mean a clean rat, it means they were bred for a purpose. And became friendly pets in the process. To know what is happening to your rat, please take her / him to the vet.


2

Yes you definitely need more than one, even more than two is best, they are very social and without another rat can become very depressed and ill. A human cannot be with them 24/7 and will never be the same as interacting with another rat. I studied animal management at uni so this is my source.


2

Definitely need more than one. Even if you give her a lot of attention, you are not always with her when she is awake, you won't clean her fur like another rat would do. You won't run with her around like another rat, you won't do the wrestling, you won't answer in a ratty language when she asks... Your rat needs you, but you cannot be like another rat ...


2

This answer is part of Pet's Spring Cleaning Campaign. This question is old, but this answer will still help people with the same problem. Rats (among other animals) have a Harderian gland at their eyes that excretes porphyrin - a chemical compound very close to hemoglobin, the compound responsible for the red color of our blood. If the rat is stressed, ill,...


2

I have noticed that it is always the most difficult task with the older rats from pet stores. I think that they had to fight the longest for the food, for a good place in the cage also the rotation is quit big so every day you (rat) have to fight for domination. I had similar problem with one of my rats. They say that a fight is OK until there's no blood, ...


2

The canonical way to prevent reopening is an e-collar (these exist for rodents) that will prevent him from licking. You could also use a bandage, but rats are fastidiously clean and he may try to remove it.


2

She probably has fleas or a skin problem bothering her, I would 100% bring her to the vet and get that checked out.


2

Sounds like you have a problem already. I didn't have mixed sex rats, but a quick google check gives a quite surprising answer: Females go into heat between about 10 and 24 hours after giving birth. Specifically, females go into heat on the first evening that is at least 10 hours after giving birth (Gilbert et al. 1985). This phenomenon of coming ...


1

I didn’t know any of that but much appreciated, He’s doing fine! I had switched him from little cotton pieces of bedding to clippings and he had eaten some and it was stuck around his teeth and all in his mouth so I had to rinse his mouth out and try and brush his teeth with a cotton swab. After I cleared it I left him be for a little bit in his own cage and ...


1

I hope it's OK with your boys right now, but for the future and possible other people with a similar problem... You haven't told us how old are the rats and how long they know each other. The most likely case is that they were trying to establish which one is the alpha one. As you can find in Wikipedia: Particularly with males, there can be some fighting ...


1

I found a site that states: On close inspection, it can be seen that rats' tails are skin, soft with hair, and the "scale" is only a texture. Rat tails are easily injured and can tear from a bite. My best guess as to what happened is they were either playing or got aggressive with one another and either accidentally or purposely bit off the tail of the ...


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