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51

Purring is a sign of wellbeing for the house cat. She certainly purrs because you are petting her, but if she would be sleeping on you then chances are she would probably also be purring without you touching her. Imagine this. When you pet her it's sort of like when you get a massage. You might fall asleep or you might drift off a little bit. Your cat is the ...


11

I knew a cat who literally purred the entire time he was awake. His vet liked to say that he "didn't know how to turn his engine off". It didn't appear to tire him at all, he had just as much energy as other cats. He never had any trouble falling asleep either (the purring would just fade out over the course of a couple of minutes). I wouldn't ...


11

There's no good reason to assume that purring is tiring for cats. Whilst the exact mechanism by which cats purr is not fully understood, it seems to be an almost passive part of breathing to them. Specifically, it seems that they have specific nerve circuitry which, when activated, causes the vocal cords to flap quickly, producing the purr we hear. As far as ...


6

It sounds like your kitten really wants kicker toys. "Bunny kicking" with their hind legs on toys is a common play behavior which regular cat toys don't really satisfy. If their desire to do that is strong enough, they'll find whatever to take it out on, such as table legs, your own legs, or in this case, blankets. Kicker toys are cat toys designed ...


6

It sounds to me like your cats mostly get along, and some of this is your worrying the situation is far worse than it actually is. Here's my read on some of their interactions: The cats cuddle and groom each other, though you only see them do it "a little." This is a very good sign that your cats actually do get along. For many if not most cats, ...


5

There is a possibility of harm To answer your specific questions: Do I need to worry about pulling the toy up? I feel like all the force goes on her neck, and I don't know if that can do some sort of damage. There is a lot of sudden movement from both of us as we play. Just like any other similar situation, exerting force suddenly can cause damage. ...


5

I'm pretty sure your cat is perfectly fine. My cat also likes to come lie in my lap to get cuddled, and she purrs loudly for most of it. Then she suddenly stops and I look down to see that she has fallen asleep. Trust me, purring won't stop a cat from falling asleep.


4

TLDR: Eye blinking does occur in social contexts, but also reflexively (to moisten the eye) and in situations where the individual feels relaxed or is mentally processing. It's impossible to conclude any attempt at communication from eye blinks alone. I've had a look at the study Eye-Blink Behaviors in 71 Species of Primates that you linked in your question....


3

I know this is an old post but we figured out what happened. Due to the way she runs and “cuts” when making sharp turns, she blew out her ACL. We didn’t find out until she started limping afterwards and took her to the vet. After surgery and everything she still likes to play even today but not this game anymore. Now it’s a simple jog out there and catch the ...


3

Bunnies laying down to pancake are a great sign, it means they are comfortable. Rabbits do need enrichment items (toys), but not all rabbits like the same toys. My former rabbit loved fling toys--things like baby toy keys that he could throw with his mouth. My current rabbit doesn't really like those; she prefers chew toys such as willow balls and loves ...


3

From the way you are describing it, it sounds to me like it is play. My two cats do exactly what you describe you and your cat doing. You are play chasing each other. I linked a video of two cats playing with one another. If you think your cat and you do something similar it should be fine. As you can see in the video cats often switch in the middle of ...


2

Two of ours do this as well, it isn't a specific toy for them, but rather a specific type of toy, small stuffed mice. They will sometimes bring them to our bedrooms, and will loudly vocalize when doing so. The purpose of the vocalization seems to be bringing attention to the fact that the toy was brought, once we acknowledge this they will go back to their ...


2

Dominance signs in cats: cat wants to show how tall it is, starts to stretch the head up and wants to get above the opponent. Dominance in rabbits: rabbit wants to be groomed, wants to get UNDER the opponent. This is why rabbits and cats are this happy together :D each of them thinks "I am the dominant one" and wins the fight. So how you described ...


2

I doubt they are "fighting". This sounds more like rough play. Rough play is common between dogs, especially puppies. Aggression or rough play? It's important to be able to distinguish between aggression and rough play. If one or both of you dogs are showing any or all of the following signs, it is true aggression: Very rigid body Raised tail ...


2

First, I think it is helpful if you start thinking of it in terms of personality instead of attitude. Cats, much like humans, are who they are. There is no way of forcing her to become your ideal pet. That said, there are things you can do to encourage them to play together. Try playing with your older cat while your younger cat observes from a safe distance....


2

The older cat might just let the younger play alone since essentially, playing is hunting practice for cats, and it might think the younger one needs the practice more. We are currently observing something similar with our two older ones, they will mostly let the younger one play and observe, and only occasionally spring into action. If they do, they do not ...


2

That is how cats hunt in the wild. While hunting small animals like mice only requires a well timed paw strike, cats employ different tactics for slightly larger animals. They usually bite the neck. Later, if they can, they pinpoint the prey and if they can't, they drag the prey until it can't resist. Victory dance also fits to general cat behaviour. Many ...


2

Try to establish a play, eat, sleep routine. It's pretty normal for cats to get hyper around mealtimes or when they're hungry, which is a likely explanation for why the incidents tend to happen when they do. Therefore, I think it would help you to change when your play sessions happen to right before mealtimes. In the wild, the natural pattern is hunt, eat, ...


1

It sounds like play behavior to me. Some of the behaviors you describe are actually kitten play behavior that while uncommon in adults, a few will continue doing past kittenhood. So it may be that your cat hasn't grown out of them yet, or it may be that it is one of those cats that keeps doing it as an adult. These behaviors are: fluffing the tail arching ...


1

I used a small hand drill & some craft wire to hold it down. Doesn’t touch the water & kitty can’t rip it apart.


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