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7

Pet stores do sell "Pet Grass" which gives them something to chew on (or grow your own). You can put it near their food and hope that it satisfies their desires. You will get more mileage out of your pet grass if you keep it watered. Also, related to this. A surprising amount of house (And outdoor) plants are toxic/poisonous to cats to various degrees. If ...


6

Why take the risk? You might be right that the amount of daffodil consumed is small enough that it won't affect the cat but on the other hand, you might not. The red flag for me is the throwing up that you mentioned and, as TrondHansen points out, this is one of the symptoms. This is what the ASPCA have to say about Narcissus (Daffodil): Toxicity: ...


5

Tomato and pepper are in the Nightshade family and toxic, so I'd worry about those, but he can probably tell. I believe cucumber is safe. Many cats enjoy nibbling selected plants. Adding fiber to the diet may help them deal with hairballs, and it may help clean their teeth, so unless you are worried about damage to the plant this is harmless at worst. You ...


5

Soda water uses carbonic acid to produce CO2 so in theory it should work, but it is not that easy: carbonic acid is as the name says an acid, and any type of acid will lower the water's pH too fast for the fish and to some degree too fast for the plants to adapt to the changed pH. Carbonic acid dissolves calcium creating calcium carbonate, so if you have ...


5

As trond hansen already posted in his link: Cats generally do not have allergic reactions to poison ivy. But hairless cats or cats with very hort hair, as well as cats with areas of exposed skin can suffer allergic reactions to poison ivy. But even then the worst case then is a red itch, which you should wash or wipe gently. The bigger problem could be ...


4

Absolutely, yes they can. Lead could a problem roadside (soil could be contaminated from the the days when leaded gas was available). Not sure how much you should be concerned as there appear to be a large number of variables. Here is a link to a publication discussing lead in the context of gardening. http://anrcatalog.ucdavis.edu/pdf/8424.pdf Weed ...


4

a) All the sources I've read talk about cats ingesting or nibbling on aloe vera, so there is likely no danger to them touching or inhaling its odor. As for the safety factor, you'd probably have to consult a professional veterinarian. In my own limited experience some cats really like chewing on plants and others rarely or not at all. If your cat starts to ...


4

Swifts are primarily insectivores, so they wont be nibbling on your plants. But as a practical consideration, swifts are both avid climbers and burrowers, so it would be quite challenging to find a live plant (and a substrate to contain it) that will hold up to the constant climbing and uprooting that the plant will experience in that smaller space. For ...


4

Cats are very good at picking out what they do and don't like in food, you may not have much luck with catnip. Cats rely mostly on smell and texture, taste is also a factor but it's very low on the list - they don't have very many taste buds (Article #1 - Article #2) like us so smell is very important. Some things to consider with wet food: Canned food ...


4

Chlorophytum for one. There are more, way more. But this one is quite safe, or as safe as green stuff is going to be for carnivores. And then there is "cat grass". That seems to be a combination of grasses, mainly green and tender new growth. Why do cats vomit? And why do they eat plants? I have no better answers then the wikipedia article on cat & ...


4

I do know very little about hamsters but i know dandelions and cat grass/wheat grass is safe for hamsters. I found this information on the net http://www.petwebsite.com/hamsters/hamster_plants_flowers.asp Alyssum Asters Bramble leaves Blackberry leaves Burnet Chickweed Clover Coltsfoot Cornflowers Cow Parsley ...


3

You have a few options: 1) Greenies 2) C.E.T Oral hygene chews for cats 3) RC Dental diet or Hills T/D (note for cats we like for them to have a good amount of wet food in their diet). 4) DentaChlor oral rinse If you go to the petstore they have dental chew toys for cats as well just keep in mind that it shouldn't be hard (stay away from bones) or have ...


3

It looks to me like you have English Ivy (Hedera helix L.). From the National Park Service: The leaves and berries of English ivy contain the glycoside hederin which may cause toxicosis if ingested. Symptoms include gastrointestinal upset, diarrhea, hyperactivity, breathing difficulty, coma, fever, polydipsia, dilated pupils, muscular weakness, and ...


3

The webmind says "What makes lilies poisonous is still unknown, but it is known that the toxin is soluble in water and deadly. Cats suffer from kidney failure after ingesting even tiny amounts of this plant and flower." Other organs may also be damaged. Bodies are basically lazy. Producing enzymes to detoxify everything they might encounter is metabolically ...


3

There are products out there that can be sprayed on objects (plant, furniture, etc) that will add a bitter taste when licked/chewed on. This might be enough of a deterrent to stop your cat from chewing on the plants. In the past when I have used it outside I applied it every couple days to the problem spot and within a week my dog had stopped chewing on the ...


3

I would say, unless you know it is safe for cats assume it to be poisonous. Most of the plants we can eat and are good for us are actually poisonous to cats. Moreover, cats have no defenses to plant born toxins. I have LOTS of plants and I keep them all behind closed doors so as not to poison my "grrrls". It is not uncommon for indoor cats to want to ...


3

The ASPCA website has an exhaustive list of toxic and non-toxic plants for dogs, cats, and horses. The site identifies 399 different plant species that are toxic to cats. Most fruit trees appear to be on the list, along with pretty much every variety of lily and a number of other common flowers like iris, chrysanthemum, and hyacinth. As written, the ...


3

It's unclear if you want a plant the cat will not eat, or a plant that keeps the cat from that specific area. But here's some tips that might help: This is a tricky one. It will really depend on the cat and you'll likely need to do some trial and error. There are numerous plants that are toxic to cats, so be careful about what you try first. If you are not ...


2

Also answered here. 2,4-D: 10 days, up to 333 in wet areas. 2,4-D degrades fairly quickly in soils (half-life about 10 days for acid, salt and ester forms), with microbial degradation considered to be the major route in the breakdown of the chemical in soil.It is, however, relatively persistent in anaerobic (low oxygen) aquatic environments (half-life ...


2

There are many plants that can be harmful to your dog, as well as other pets, if ingested; with negative side effects that can even cause death. More than 700 plants contain toxic substances that may harm dogs or cats if ingested. Signs of poisoning can be mild to severe and in some cases, pets can even die. Most houseplants have multiple names, so it's ...


2

I have lots of plants and keep them all behind closed doors so none of my cats can eat them. I do this for the benefit of the cats much more so than the plants.


2

You'll need to give your plants some fertilizer (I assume that's the word you didn't know). This site gives an overview of some symptoms and what might be missing then. Having a general/allround fertilizer would be a good start (CO2 is probably not really required). Personally, I use Profito and my plants grow really well.


2

As Keshlam noted, the effect of some forms of lilies on the kidneys of cats is well known, but the reason for the toxicity is not. However, there are also many plants called lily and the toxicity can be different or non-existent, depending on the plant. This is further made difficult because of hybrids. In the case of lily of the valley, for example, the ...


2

No, don't keep it from doing that. Just watch what plants the dog picks (should be tall grass only) and try to determine the reason for this. Consider the eating and throwing up a symptom, not a reason. Try to fight the actual reason (if it's something harmful). So picking up JoshDM's answer here: According to "A Vet's Take On Why Dogs Eat Grass" (...


2

Yes - meat :D Seriously though, cats are naturally carnivorous and don't really chew as much as slice (but thats being a bit pedantic) in order to keep their teeth clean. Eating grass/plant matter helps with digestion but can be overindulged in - especially with house cats, since to them it can be something special/zomg amazing, but you already know that. ...


2

I assume you refer to fresh water. Nobody bothers with pH, KH and phosphate in fresh water. What matters (as far as the filter is concerned) is Physical cleaning (remove debris and particles) and The bio-cycle of ammonia transformation to nitrite, and then nitrite transformation to nitrate. This is taken care of by the bio-media (by microbes that settle on ...


2

Is there any way to keep indoor houseplants, and be certain that they are inaccessible to cats? Yes, but it depends on the specifics of your home and how agile your cats are. F.e. you can have pots hanging from the ceiling at a height that you can reach but surrounded by enough empty air (so not close to a shelf f.e.) that the cats physically can't jump ...


2

In the description there is this: Drop the tablet in different spots of the aquarium, for more even distribution of CO2 2 tablets for every 10 gallon of water, dose 2 times a week So seems like it's ok to just drop them in your tank. But I've also already seen kits like this where a small basket was included with suction cups, where you could ...


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