56

Fostering is a great way to see if you're ready to commit to a dog, contact your local rescues to see what kind of dogs are available. The perks with fostering are: 1) You're helping a dog in need. 2) You do not need to keep the dog or find it a new home if you decide it's not for you. 3) Shelters typically provide all food and vet care, no cost to you. ...


31

I don't know specifically about England, but here in Germany, many pet shelters are looking for volunteers who (regularily) take dogs for a walk. Even if they might not have your specific breed available, interacting with different dogs will teach you a lot about them, and it will allow you to check if you're really that enthusiastic about the daily care a ...


20

There are several considerations: Health: A top priority is a visit to the vet to check for any health issues (illness, parasites) and get any immediately-needed vaccines (your vet will advise on this). The vet should also check for a microchip; if for any reason the vet can't check this, call a local shelter and ask where you can have the cat checked. Do ...


15

Bonobos are NOT pets! And please, for you and the bonobo, do not try to keep one as pet. There are at least four reasons for this: Bonobos are not safe. The circumstances of bonobo capture and sale. Bonobo care. Legality. 1. Bonobos are not safe to be around for humans. This story on BBC debunks a few of the myths around bonobos; they do bite and are not ...


15

Other answers are good. One thing you might not have thought of is to go on a walk for an hour every morning and an hour every evening. See how you feel after doing this for a month. Don't allow yourself to miss a session. Can you see yourself sticking to that regime for the next decade rain or shine?


14

No, koalas are not good pets. Koalas can be aggressive. They have very long, sharp, and strong claws for climbing trees, and can bite. Koalas can do enough damage to send you to the hospital. (Warning for graphic images of koala inflicted injury. I'm not joking, it's pretty gruesome.) http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2862089/Looks-deceiving-South-...


13

The Australian Koala Foundation calls themselves "the principal non-profit, non-government organisation dedicated to the conservation and effective management of the wild koala and its habitat". They state: No, it is not permitted anywhere in the world. It is illegal to have a Koala as a pet anywhere, even in Australia. The only people who are ...


13

Many foster agencies will let you let you take a dog for Monday - Friday and then decide. They want to place the dog in a good fit. Within a breed personalities differ. I would base the decision more on the dog.


12

Here are the steps I'd take if I found a kitten and wanted to keep it and wasn't as horrendously allergic to feline dander. Note that several are generic, applicable to any newly "found" pet: Bring it to a vet to establish a health record and determine if there are any immediately outstanding health issues. Be willing to shell out some $. The vet should ...


12

I'm sorry you lost your male cat. Getting another cat will be good for both you and your female cat. I would get an adult cat, not a kitten. A mature cat will likely be calmer, and less likely to annoy your cat. Plus, you'll be able to determine the cat's temperament. And you'll be giving a home to an adult cat (they are harder to find homes for than ...


11

I can't speak for other species, but for dogs, the AKC page on Finding Your Dog describes "responsible breeders as: The American Kennel Club believes that breeding programs should be undertaken responsibly for the purpose of preserving breed characteristics and producing healthy, well-socialized puppies. Responsible breeders are expected to give careful ...


11

@Yvette totally nailed it, but I will emphasize another consideration: Maybe some people can bond with and love any animal that shows up on their doorstep, but I can't, and I think it's too much to ask of anyone. Neither spouses nor pets should be chosen sight unseen by a third party, largely for the same reasons. If you're going to live with and care ...


11

Is it true that ferrets don't get along with other pets? The answer is a qualified "no". I had two ferrets. The oldest was always, always happy to make new friends, regardless of the species. He was very excited to play with any new dog or cat he met, and would do the ferret "bounce" that typically indicates play. My other ferret was more curious than ...


11

In short, no. Tortoises and hamsters have different needs for their habitats. While some hamsters might live in the desert in the wild, any hamster you buy in the store will have been bred inside for so long that, among other things, they've evolved to live at a normal room temperature (60-75 °F / 16-24 °C). Meanwhile tortoises simply ...


11

A few general observations from my experience: Kittens will usually adapt to entering a new household or having a new cat join them faster than older cats. Cats from multi-cat households will adapt to a new multi-cat household faster than cats who were the only cat in the household. In general, adding a cat to a single-cat household works better if the cat ...


11

My answer's going to be the same as one I've previously given. I would avoid getting an animal and expect it to take care of any insect problems. If the flies can get in, the animal that's going to eat the flies can get out. Then you're not only back where you started, but possibly responsible for introducing an invasive species into your area. If you let ...


11

Check if it has tufts of fur between the toes. That's a sign that most long and medium-long haired cats share. Long-haired cat's paw: (Source) Short-haired cat's paw: (Source) You can see in the long-haired cat's paw, there's that sudden sprout of long hair sticking out. You'll also be able to see that with the front paws.


10

I'm not sure how reliably anyone could quantify this, as I know of no global pet survey, but it appears the answer to the question of whether rabbits are ranked #3 is: probably not. Even though the numbers vary from country to country, cats, dogs, and freshwater fish tend to be more popular than rabbits (and fish seem a very unlikely candidate for a shelter, ...


10

If you are going to be out for 9-11 hours a day then your sleep time will be around 7-8 hrs a day. It means the dog will be alone for almost 16 to 18 hours. Add the time you will do household chores and ask yourself if you are going to be able to give your dog even 3-4 hours a day, which according to me is very minimal. So I would request you to not get a ...


10

As others have already stated, you'll definitely want to look at organisations that are looking for volunteers for both fostering but also dog walking. For example, The UK's Blue Cross have a scheme which allows you to walk their dogs for them. I would definitely look at this option even if you think you're already set on your dog breed. I was absolutely ...


9

Honestly, it depends a lot on personal preference. A baby snake will eventually grow into an adult snake. Personally, I would consider the species of snake as well as whether or not it's captive-bred or wild-caught much more important than the age. If you are a first-time snake keeper I would strongly recommend a king snake over a boa. (Other good first-...


9

Years of experience of taking in second hand dogs here - I quickly gave up trying to deal with the sort of private shelter you apparently want to get a dog from. Many of them treat you with a degree of suspicion, you have to fill out five pages of paperwork, they insist on inspecting your home, charge huge amounts for what are now often unsocialized, ...


8

The only mammals you'd be able to keep healthy on a vegetarian diet would be rabbits, or rodents like gerbils, hamsters, mice, rats, guinea pigs, etc. They will all do fine on a diet of vegetables and grains. If you have the means to, you could keep an exotic pet like a fruit bat. But I would stress that bats are high maintenance, might require a license ...


8

Probably not Good pet might not be the word for it. While very smart, crows need a lot of space, probably more then you can provide. And smart means they need mental stimulation. Think flying border collie. As for fit as a pet, there are quite a number of stories around of people who made it work. Most of them have the crow outdoors with a good relation to ...


8

Adopting a pet just prior to a move is probably not the best choice. The top two reasons for pets to be surrendered to a shelter are Moving and Landlord not allowing pets. Imagine you and your pet have just created a strong bond and now must be separated. Many (most?) colleges do not allow pets on campus, of those that do, there are restrictions. There ...


8

https://www.borrowmydoggy.com/ is a website that allows just this - you can get matched with local dog owners to give their dogs walks. It's potentially a simpler starter than fostering. I've not used it personally, but some friends have (as dog owners) and love it.


7

As important as selecting a dog breed is to select the breeder or the place you buy it. And while it is not a direct answer to your question, keep in mind that if you buy some puppy from a breed with less HD risk on some street corner, you do not buy a breed or race, but an individual dog. So it is just important to know the HD status of the parents. A good ...


7

This is a general answer, without taking into account breeder issues. Your profile says you live in Lagos, Nigeria. I'm not familiar with any breeders there and American vaccination laws may not apply to you. You do have it right in that ferrets will smell bad if their diet is poor. So it's important that you give them food that doesn't have fillers like ...


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