53

It doesn't really matter. It's a training thing. You can make the dog respond to either name it might just take some time, especially for older dogs. We adopted our second dog from a shelter and he was so conditioned on his name that he'd cower in fear hearing it, so changing it was not a question. If you think about it, training a new name is basically ...


35

Dogs respond to the vowel sounds more than the consonants. If you change the name but keep the same (or similar) vowel sounds, chances are it'll be completely seamless. My uncle got a rescue dog named Sasha. My uncle was mentally handicapped, and had some trouble enunciating, so he started off with this sounding more like "Shasha". He and my mum decided ...


17

Yes, Both Gram and Mario have good answers about changing the name a dog already recognizes But, many of the names that shelter pets have are not the names the grew up with. If the pet was surrendered by the owner who supplied the name when the pet was brought in AND if that name was not totally inappropriate, than the pet probably is using its "given" ...


11

We have adopted 3 rescue dogs over the past five years; we taught each one of them their new names in a short amount of time by associating their new name with good stuff. According to this article, dogs do not get personally attached to names like humans do; it's what the name is associated with, this is why experts recommend not using the dogs name if ...


6

As @Zaralynda commented, part of the answer can be found in this question: How can I tell if my cat knows his name? However I don't think you are considering the right problem. There is no difference between teaching a dog a new name and teaching a dog his name. What is "teaching a name" in the first place? The fact that we have to teach/re-teach its name ...


4

From personal experience I don't think it really matters, it just matter of time for dog to get trained to respond to a new name. I have rescued my staffy that at the time was 3 years old and her original name was Didi and it only took couple of months for her to fully get used to her new name which is Luna. I've got her now for 3 years and she doesn't even ...


4

Yes, it is realistically possible, not only hypothetically. Research was done (I do not have ready any link) and it was proved that dogs can learn more than a few hundred words - and their meaning too. In our family, my dog (unusually big Pekinese) surely understands the meaning of the words for the following categories: names of the people in our family (...


4

I bet millions of cats are named with names like "Sam". Are they less well trained? I bet no (But I have no proof either). Let us focus on the reason Chris C. Pinney gives you for his suggestion: This will allow it to differentiate between its name and those one syllable commands you may choose to teach it. What is a name? As a human, we identify ...


3

I read a book about assistance dogs for blind people. Because of some circumstances, the assistance dog had to have a new name. When the trainer wanted to have his attention, he started to call him with the new name first. For example the dog's name was Henry but shall be Fred. Than he said: "Fred Henry, come here" Or "Fred Henry, sit". Or just "Fred Henry" ...


2

I cannot provide any objective, scientific studies, but our dog learned to respond to different people using different words for his name or commands. One member of my family likes to call him by a pet name that sounds close to his actual name and he reacts to both. One family member uses a specific whistle sound (that no-one else can reproduce) to call him ...


1

The dog will need to adjust to you, your family, and a new home. During that period they will adjust to new name if you want a new name. Learn a name is not harder than learn a command like sit. I used to foster with a local adoption agency (they moved). Foster would care for the dog Monday through Friday and the dog was at the agency being shown on the ...


1

The criticalness of this really depends on the dog. I currently have a lab/beagle I inherited. I trained her to be fully therapy ceritifed (P.P. B+)... but she is not "bright". I love her, but she doesn't really understand her "name". She -does- understand and respond strongly to a very specific whistle that I use to call her in the wilderness. Pretty sure ...


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