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12

It depends on the species of parrot you plan to buy. E.g. African grey parrots are the most intelligent ones and quick learners. They have the most clear voice. Similarly the macaws, alexandrine can also mimic human voices well. Indian ringnecks, budgies etc will not mimic human voices but can only produce different kinds of whistles. It would be best to ...


11

Frankly she sounds like she has you trained pretty well. Here are some tips that I used to teach this to a number of different birds. Your conure is still very young so this shouldn't be terribly difficult. Don't attempt training when they are near their cage A bird sees its cage as its territory and it gives the bird comfort as well as makes the bird ...


8

From https://m.petmd.com/bird/care/overgrown-beak-birds-trimming-your-birds-beak "If an owner suspects overgrowth of his or her bird’s beak, the bird should be checked by a veterinarian as soon as possible to rule-out underlying illness as the cause of overgrowth and to safely have the beak trimmed. The blood supply in an overgrown beak tends to be even ...


5

This is an excellent question, and an area of some controversy right now. I'll stick to the main non-controversial points here, and will offer some personal experience. I won't try to settle the controversies, but hope that these reflections are useful for helping you in using your best judgement. (1) Do not ever buy a baby parrot that is not weaned unless ...


5

Looks to me like your parrot has a cataract in his eye. Basically, it's a decrease in opacity of the lens in the eye, which appears like a milky white cloud, that can lead to decreased vision or blindness. Usually this is a sign of age, but that typically means in both eyes. If it's just the one, there could be additional health concerns. In either case, ...


5

Well, things turned out to be that being friendly with the bird and loving him, no matter what, worked! Now I have a very lovely parrot. So rules I followed are: If parrot behaves bad then do not interact with him for a while (~20 min) (parrots love social interaction and become very upset without it) If parrot behaves good then interact with him socially (...


4

That's from a dog training point of view, I've never had (or seen) a talking parrot. What you want to do is called shaping. The idea is to obtain the final behavior by reinforcing successive approximations. To give him the information "great, you're good, keep going" you may want to use a clicker (or any clear, distinct sound) and food treats. The clicker ...


4

There are a couple of factors at play here; 1: African Grey parrots reach sexual maturity at ~4 years of age. Your bird is sexually mature. 2: African Grey females feed their young by regurgitating into the babies mouth. Males feed females mates in the same way, while the female is brooding a clutch (sitting on eggs) and while the chicks are very small. ...


4

Looking at the opinions of other keepers and internet consultants the safest and most recommended/used substrate for parrot cages is paper. Newspaper and white or brown butcher paper are mentioned on ALL personal sites.


4

The Old Train of Thought We are slowly but steadily making progress on diets for our captive parrots, the old train of thought was comparing parrots to chickens in the sense of only feeding them seeds and nuts. This has led to many many health issues such as fatty liver disease, heart disease, vitamin/mineral deficits, egg binding and more.. Pellets, ...


4

It's very hit or miss with parrots regardless of age, as babies they are more likely to get along however once they become adults it still has a chance to turn sour. Some things to keep in mind when introducing new birds to the flock. Testing new birds for Chlamydia and PBFD, quarantine is a must until you get results. Have a separate cage for the new ...


4

In general, many animals, including parrots, should not be given foods very high in sugar, fat, or sodium. It is not technically toxic, but too much of these things can cause various medical issues. There are also a variety of foods that are toxic or possibly toxic to parrots that can be found in sweets: chocolate licorice xylitol - a sugar substitute that ...


4

You could use a gentle heat lamp (ensuring the actual heating elements, which can burn, can't be touched by animals), or use rubber hot water bags or heated socks full of rice (you can microwave these) covered with cloth in a way that is safe and appealing to them! Online you may be able to find heat pads that hold heat better than water/rice, and there are ...


4

The budgie clean the feathers mutually which is a sign of infection and important social behavior, but when they tear feathers (out of moulting period) it can be "pecking". Pecking is behavioral disturbance in pet birds that can last several years if there are no interventions. We do not know this behavior in wild birds. There are two categories of pecking, ...


4

Judging from the behavior of our 2 African Grey parrots (25 and 15 years old) they can be somewhat unpredictable. Because yours has been teased, I think you have 2 strikes against yourself. Ours have never been teased and still will pinch on rare occasion. There is a positive affect of approaching the bird with confidence; my adult son visits every couple ...


3

I did not receive an answer here, so I wanted to post my own experiences. A couple of days later the bird became less aggressive, came out of the nest box more often, and stayed out for longer. When the time came to move her to a new cage, she was upset and kept screaming for a while. I put the nest box in the new cage, but she would not go and sit on the ...


3

Bye Bye Mirror! There's a few reasons why most do not recommend mirrors, mainly because: It can prevent obtaining a good relationship with your budgie. The budgie can over bond with the mirror causing sexual frustration or reluctance to bond with other birds. Aggression towards mirrored bird (though not your case) It is recommended and safe to remove the ...


3

Positive reinforcement it's the key. Ignore undesirable behaviours, and reward your parrot everytime he has a good behaviour (e.g. paying more attention to him, coddle him, etc.). It's also important try to understand why parrot does that things; maybe he's bored and needs more toys, or play with his owner. It's very important that you provide things to ...


3

She thinks of you as another parrot, another member of her flock, a relative, and possibly as her mate, and is treating you that way when trying to feed you. It's weird from our human point of view, but it makes perfect sense to a bird. Not liking other humans: she may see them as competition, or she may just not trust them. I don't speak bird well enough ...


3

I have two budgies, one male, one female. Each bird has its own cage because the female tends to bully the male so I give him his own cage. See photo. I use Hagen Vision cages for my budgies. The design has a plastic base which is about 10 cm (4") deep. I fill this base to depth of about 8 cm (3") with clean shredded waste paper i.e. junk mail etc that ...


3

You are correct--your conure's current feathers will remain until his next molt. I'm a little concerned that he is on a diet almost entirely of pellets. Conures like and need variety in their diets. My green-cheek get LaFeber's Nutriberries for conures (which are also fun foraging food), Ecotrition Essentials cockatiel food, and he loves red leaf lettuce, ...


3

From the bird's perspective, a finger (pointing, or) coming towards it might trigger safety alarms: "oh no! a snake!" End result: a nip or bite. Try a different approach. If you want the little one to climb onto your finger, present the finger horizontally and (ever so) gently allow your finger to brush the stomach or linger in front of both feet. Your bird ...


3

Some birds can be effectively potty trained (although not all - it varies from individual bird to individual bird). There's no hard and fast rules to work out whether they can or not - you just have to give it a try and see if it works. That said you'll stand a better chance with larger birds (who can "hold" the poop longer than smaller ones such as budgies) ...


3

We have 2 African greys, about 25 and 20 years. We have found "a busy beak is a happy beak". They love to tear things apart, never had a problem with splinters. Their favorite is chicken leg bones, they turn them into sawdust getting the marrow. Chicken bones are probably too big for cockatiels.


2

This question is nearly unanswerable, as he could want to go outside for plenty of reasons, but I'll try. Pets are just like humans, they can change, he might of just gotten used to your certain area and wanted to move on, or something you don't know of could've frightened him to run outside, maybe the sound of your wife coming in scared him? There's ...


2

Normally newspaper is what people would use but you can actually buy sandpaper like sheets from the pet store for use with parrot and small parakeet cages. They are brown and about the size of a piece of writing paper (8x11").


2

The only available avian vaccine is for avian polyomavirus (APV). APV is usually only a problem for hand-fed chicks. If chicks are parent-raised (or if they are shared-socialized, so that the parents and the human caretaker both feed the chicks), APV is rarely a problem, because antibodies are passed from the parents to the chicks during feedings. The ...


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