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10

You'd probably have the best luck at a pet store, unless you happen to have a friend that breeds them (or a local breeder). However, if you go to the pet store, make sure they know you want a pet and not food for another :) While feeder mice are cute, cuddly, white, and everything else you are looking for - they're specifically bred for food and sometimes ...


9

This sounds like perfectly normal behavior. Imagine you were almost swallowed by a giant beast and then suddenly put into an unknown place. Wouldn't you turn around and try to orient yourself? The mouse was probably Trying to assess whether the cat was still around Trying to orient itself Trying to find a way back home or at least back to known ...


8

Luckily it's incredibly easy to 'train' mice not to bite at hands. Although it's not so much of training as it is getting them comfortable with hands. Small rodents like mice, gerbils, and hamsters, have it pretty rough at the pet store. Children will come into the store and immediately run to see the cute fluffy rodents, banging their hands against the ...


7

Most pet stores sell white mice for both pet and reptile feeder purposes. Choose one for pet purposes, as feeder mice are intended for food and are potentially genetically inferior, possibly due to inbreeding. That having been said, using a rescued feeder mouse with a potentially short life-span could be a good training tool to familiarize oneself with ...


7

I believe you are referring to a Riddex plug-in device. I used to own one, and used it in my apartment where I lived with a dachshund. The instant I plugged the device in, a spider appeared on the wall from a vent, and crawled away down the hall. This proved to me that the device actually did "something" to justify the manufacturer's claim. My dog, a ...


7

There is no unequivocal right or wrong answer to what you asking. You simply have to decide what you think and feel is right here. Many people believe animal's lives have value, that they should have the right to peruse their own interests as much as possible, and that undue animal suffering should be prevented and mitigated where possible. Many view these ...


5

I do not think you need to be worried about your cat getting infected by toxoplasmosis a very large number of cats do have this and it is not dangerous for a healthy cat. The main danger from toxoplsmosis is to pregnant women or animals but only if they are infected during pregnancy (there is a risk for abortion). If the woman or animal is infected some ...


5

For most small rodents, such as rats or mice, I would look to use hardwood wood shavings (aspen is usually easily found, depends on where you are). Avoid softwood shavings, such as pine or cedar as they're known to be very problematic and not just for rats and mice. There is also other bedding options, commercially available, made from recycled papers that ...


4

I had these in every room in the house. My dog began slowly to show signs of discomfort, teeth chattering and started to jump with movements around her. It was getting worse. I took her to the vet to check her teeth and also a full check over. He found nothing. Then one evening it occurred to me it maybe the plugs so I turned them all off. It has been ...


4

Hantavirus from their droppings is no bueno - potentially lethal. Sanitize, fortify and secure the home to rid the presence of them and prevent their re-establishing habitation there. Consider ultra-sonic and predator scent abatement. If you are catching that many mice, then you need to establish a perimeter, clean the inlets into your home from the ...


4

A lab mouse of 1,5 years of age is considered old, so we can definitely rule out puperty. Old age in lab mice means that this is typically the age where the effects of senescence set in. So he might have joint pain or some inflammation or something else that makes him feel unwell. You might unknowingly have caused him pain by handling him, which prompted ...


3

Ethically... Your cat bring you a mouse: this is a gift it would bring its children too, to feed them, to train their hunting behavior. You have three ways here: kill it, dispose of it kill it, feed it let it go First point I think is disposing of the corpse referring to cycle of nature... Second point: Your cat brings it as food, if it does not eat ...


3

If she's actually drooling or foaming at the mouth, she could have some sort of medical issue, ranging from overgrown teeth to an infection. Your best bet would be a proper exotics veterinarian to diagnose and treat her. From experience, a respiratory infection's running nose can look like "foam" or drool in the mouth area given they are so tiny! ...


3

I'd say you are right in assuming that Ace can smell your other mouse. I would do your best to wash your hands after handling the new guy, and especially before handing Ace, as rodents have a very strong sense of smell, and he can not only smell the new mouse on you, but anything else you've handled (that biscuit from breakfast 7 hours ago, even). You can ...


3

Get a cheap/used aquarium or glass/plastic habitat with a netted top until she grows large enough that she can't fit through the bars on her intended habitat. It shouldn't take more than a month or so for her to grow large enough.


3

What I like to use is shredded paper, because even though it is nessicary to clean it often, it has proven to be the more comfortable option for my mice. It is very easy for them to burrow in, and they can move and rip it as they please to build up on theirs “ house”. It is also really cheap. I can get many months out of one 3 dollar bag, it is also very ...


2

Depending on what you are using the lab rat for, this should be a very careful decision. They are many studies analyzing different types of cage beddings and many have advantages and disadvantages. As I do not know what you are using your rat for, I will provide you with a very useful document and allow you to decide. This document is from animalethics.org ...


2

It's a possible allergy sign, have you tried changing food? Not sure what you're feeding her now, but you could try cutting out different food items to see if you can spot the source and/or put her on a rice-based diet. Another possibility there is the bedding, also something to consider changing up. If you're using wood, consider dropping it for something ...


2

This is definitely social behaviour. If it were aggressive, you'd be hurting, and it would be quick and lunging, and he would be showing other signs of aggression such as side-walking and puffiness. He definitely seems to like you. From what you have described it seems as if this is affectionate behavior - does he lick you when he does it? I would say he is ...


2

I don't know much about the mice, but I know rats and with rats is that a young or new rat (that doesn't know you) has to learn the smell of you finger to tell apart what is food and what is your finger. It could be also the case for older rats at times: when you have your fingers all dirty with some food like let's say yoghurt - then the rat (especially ...


1

It is the best to have your friend examined by a doctor. However, in the meanwhile, have the following in mind: He might need a partner for... a specific activity. He should be an adult by now, I guess. His natural / wild instincts come to the surface. The doctor should be able to tell if there is some affliction generating the behavioral change.


1

I want to add something to Mick's comment. When a mouse bites you, it either is playing, feels threatened, is scared, or wants to defend itself. So the best option is to let it crawl in your hand (Do NOT pick it up by its tail or anywhere) and just hold it and try and tolerate the bite. It will eventually see your hand as not a threat and will not bite you ...


1

It's non aggressive, if your fingers have the sent of food they may try to taste or they will do it to groom/have some fun. Your little mouse seems to like you!


1

My rat Bella (2 months old) bit me before. I said EEK! when she did. Something with saying EEK! that will make them stop. But you have to do it more than once. I'm still teaching her not to bite. Every time they bite you say EEK! don't be quiet about it tho or they won't think much about it.


1

In are kitchen we have an electric fly killer to get rid of fly's. Recently our dog has being crying and acting as if he is scared. We tutned of all of any thing electrical like lights and flash lights but he seemed fine so turned back on everything and he went back to his bad behavior. Recently we were eating when when we heard are fly killer make a noise ...


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