15

As a vet who sees a lot of cats, Cerenia is one of the most common drugs I turn to for cats these days. It is far superior to many of the other anti-emetics used in the past. It is nice in that it also has some anti-inflammatory properties particularly good for conditions such as pancreatitis or rhinitis. It is true that the tablet form is widely used off ...


6

After a month, I'm happy to say that my cat and I have a much better time with giving her medicine! She still isn't excited to get medicine, but she doesn't fight me with it anymore. And after being given a few minutes to collect herself, she's a happy friend again. So my answer is, give your cat time and it gets better. There are a few things that I did ...


6

It's safe to administer Cerenia tablets, but only when prescribed by a veterinarian. According to https://allaboutcats.com/cerenia-for-cats, Cerenia tablets aren't formally licensed for use with cats, but the veterinary community views them as mostly safe in certain situations. Cerenia Tablets for Cats Cerenia tablets are also available, formulated for oral ...


4

This post is several years old but I will update it to add that there is now Revolution Plus which includes an additional active ingredient specifically targeting ticks. This might already be common knowledge to many or most pet people but hopefully will help anyone searching this information.


4

Your intention is very noble, but it seems to be unnecessary. According to this study Outcome of FeLV-infected cats in a large pet adoption program Rates of feline infection with feline leukemia (FeLV) in the U.S. are estimated at around 3 percent, including approximately 60,000 shelter cats. Such cats are frequently euthanized following a single positive ...


4

It seems known that infected cats could respond in different ways, like this (old) scientific paper states: Clinical and immunologic aspects of FeLV-induced immunosuppression G K Ogilvie et al. Vet Microbiol. 1988 Jul. Cats exposed to the feline leukemia virus (FeLV) may mount an effective immune response and eliminate the virus, develop a non-viremic, ...


4

Please read the package leaflet and follow the instructions given there. If you cannot find the leaflet or any helpful information in it, treat the overdose as if it was a regular dose. Do not skip one or more doses, just continue the treatment at the regular interval with the appropriate dosage. If your cat starts panting while in rest or hiding more than ...


4

The dose on the label says to give 2 capsules per day in cats over 10 lbs. From the product information on Amazon: Your cats are very large – they will be fine with 150 mg per day. In fact, your male cat exceeds the cat dose range and would probably be fine with the 225 mg capsules (however, as we dose to healthy body weight, you should stick with your vet'...


3

Frame challenge, what you really need to do is medicate two cats successfully, not necessarily at once. Or in other words, medicate one cat without showing the other cat that it is an unpleasant thing. I'd advise against trying to press the issue when your cats are already resisting or fleeing. While you might be successful this time, you'll make the next ...


3

Please keep in mind hat I am not a vet or otherwise medically trained professional. The best information I could find is that "most of the needle" should be inserted into the skin. There's no need to make sure that absolutely all of the metal part is inserted, but the more length of needle is in the skin, the more secure it is. Setting the tip of ...


3

According to the prescribing information sheet: The recommended minimum dosage is 2.7 mg selamectin per pound (6 mg/kg) of body weight and 0.45 mg sarolaner per pound (1 mg/kg) of body weight. Administer the entire contents of a single tube (or two tubes in combination for cats weighing over 22 pounds) of REVOLUTION PLUS topically in accordance with the ...


3

I am not a medical professional and this answer is not medical advice nor a substitute for medical advice. At first, it could be helpful to estimate whether the eye drops could even have frozen in the temperature inside your fridge. Pure water freezes at 0 °C, but any dissolved impurities will generally lower the freezing point (for example, saturating water ...


3

One of the most common vitamin overdoses in cats is Vitamin D. It can be caused by vitamin supplements or medications containing high amounts of vitamin D, but also by ingesting certain plants, rat poison, certain skin creams and even commercial cat food (see case study). It's also possible to overdose a cat with poorly balanced diets containing high ...


3

This answer is part of Pet's Spring Cleaning Campaign. This question is old, but this answer will still help people with the same problem. Pet crate or should I fold the seats and let her roam free inside the car? Or should she be in the front seat, or maybe on top of my lap while I drive? Absolutely not on your lap while driving. That is a safety hazard. ...


2

While I have personally never tried either fresh or dried valerian root on my cats, catnip company Meowijuana, among many others, offers a blend of catnip and dried valerian root, which they advertise as offering "calm and collectiveness" and "tranquility." The reviews are primarily positive, mentioning a mix of both "laying around&...


2

While the existing answers offer some excellent insight into the question offered in the title of this question, "What is a safe dose of Vitamin D," I feel all have missed one very critical piece of the picture from the actual body of the question: She wants my vitamin D. No, she doesn't. I cannot emphasize this enough: Your cat has no idea ...


2

This question is almost impossible to answer. The only reason why I don't close it is that you've already been to the vet and they didn't give you any answers either. No-one can know whether he will survive or not. You should not feed milk to cats, it could cause diarrhea. A better alternative is a teaspoon of yogurt or any of the alternatives listed in this ...


2

Depending on the taste of the medication (which you should never taste, of course!) a cat may never voluntarily swallow it. We've made some really bad experiences with dewormer tablets. First we smeared liver paste on it and stuffed it into the mouth of our cat. The liver paste was swallowed, the tablet was spit out. Then we crushed the tablet and mixed it ...


2

If the medication can be mixed with liquids, like if it's a powder or liquid, then there are cat treats that are like a gravy or broth that are really perfect for this purpose, like Fancy Feast broth. It's also convenient because it's a liquid, the cats like to lick the dish clean, so you can really be sure they ate all of it.


2

The University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine has a Guidebook on Feline Panleukopenia for animal shelters: https://www.uwsheltermedicine.com/library/guidebooks/feline-panleukopenia/vaccination Quoting some excerpts here in case of link rot: For pregnant cats expected to carry kittens to term, balance the risk of inducing abortion or ...


2

I think you should contact your vet for information and to get the vaccines administered to your sheep. You can take a look here http://www.sheep101.info/201/vaccinations.html there do exist atleast two types of pneumonia vaccines,your vet will know the type your sheep might need. there might be other types of vaccines that your sheep will need that are ...


1

If possible, alternate the timing of the medication. One cat receives meds in the AM and the other in the PM. This won't work if it's a twice daily medication and it's not ideal to make an abrupt switch, but may be possible depending on your circumstances.


1

Each allergy shot has a very small amount of the allergen that triggers a reaction in your pupper. The therapy is designed to "present" the allergen to his body, under the threshold that triggers a reaction, so that, when in the future his body detects the allergen in the real world he doesn't react (as bad).


1

You discontinued the wrong medicine. Once she started vomiting, you should have discontinued the Proton Pump Inhibitor, not the antibiotic (amoxicillin/metronidazole). Your dog vomiting and being unable to hold food down after taking metronidazole and a PPI is great news. It means the metronidazole was killing the bacteria/parasite that has been causing ...


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