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8

Sounds like territorial behavior. Contrary to common belief, female cats will spray territorially as well as males, but it is less common. Cats spray more when they are stressed, like when they are in a new territory, or their territory is being disrupted, like if there is someone or something in it that wasn't there before. So it's very likely related to ...


7

Without fully knowing the situation, I would guess that this might actually be territorial spraying. Spraying isn't the same thing as pee (I'll spare the details). I hope someone has a better answer but I think chances are that with a mix of males and females, it is probably just too many cats for an indoor space. To attempt to determine what the source of ...


7

Rabbits mark their territory using scent gland located under chin. Male rabbits, or bucks in particular, will often rub their chin on anything they consider theirs. This is referred to as chinning. Rabbits will do this to define territory boundaries. In addition, rabbits will spray their territory. Bucks and Does are both capable of spraying; however, bucks ...


5

Pet Rabbits are often referred to as house rabbits. They are from the general Domestic rabbit stock that trace their origins to the European rabbit or common rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) native to southwestern Europe (Spain and Portugal) and northwest Africa (Morocco and Algeria). In the wild these rabbits live in underground warrens, in small groups. ...


4

Per this Cat Centric article on removing feline urine, treating with enzymes is more effective than vinegar alone. Vinegar provides the perception of cleanliness; proper enzymatic cleaning provides the complete removal of waste. The intent of saturating with enzymes is to break down the uric acid salts into gases. It is these residual uric acid salts that ...


3

If a rat pees on you in small drops, it is to mark its territory and designate what belongs to it as you guessed it. It's a natural behavior for rats, in a group they also pee on each other ... and for him you are part of the social group. It’s like a mark of friendship. However, it is very difficult if not impossible to eliminate as a behavior simply ...


3

You are correct that the first and best step to modify spraying and poor litter box habits is spay/neuter. You are also correct that the behavior your are seeing is likely related to territory marking. Every bunny likes to be secure in the ownership of their space. The scenario you mention is not unusual, but there is not one simple thing you can do to ...


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