Hot answers tagged

9

Time and patience. Cats are not dogs; they don't adjust quickly to harnesses or leashes, and every cat I've known will "shut down" the first time (usually the first several times) they're put into a harness. The solution is to give them time to acclimate to the feeling of the harness on their body, and to get used to the idea that yes, they can still move ...


9

First let me add a few word of caution here: Do not use a head halter / halt / holt alone. It can cause serious damage to their neck. Use it in combination with a leash attached to a flat collar or harness. The dog pulls on the leash attached to the collar, and you control the head with another leash. You can also use a cani cross harness for the pulling ...


9

I have had dogs that loved being on a cable and I have had dogs that hated it. The placement of the cable, the personality and breed of your dog are very important. I had a German Shepherd who we once tried to put on a cable. He hated it so much he tore it off the side of the house. We got an electric fence after that, but that did not work either. We ended ...


6

My lead's P-Clip got all stiff and as my wife is beginning to suffer from arthritis we searched and searched for pain free solution to this age old problem. The answer for us was a fairly new product called a Magloc. It has a magnet that connect the lead to the collar and then some clever little jaws hold it in place. The best bit is the release, just ...


6

I have been using an H-style cat harness with no regrets on my young energetic neutered male (age nine months when I got him) for six months. The H-style harness is two loops, one around the neck and one around the waist--I would say under the armpits. Width: 1 centimetre or 3/8th inch. I read that the loop under the armpits, which I will call the body loop, ...


4

It might be a case of overstimulation. If she's used to looking out a closed window, she's used to the visual input alone and very muted sounds. Now that the window is opened, she gets the usual visual input accompanied by much louder sounds, many different smells, the sensation of airflow and probably much more sensual input than we humans are aware of. ...


4

Full disclaimer, I'm the owner of Rover Roamer Aerial Dog Runs, but I think I may be able to contribute to the conversation. These points come from my own experience. For a dog, even worse than discipline is a feeling of abandonment. They are social creatures and rely on a sense of belonging. A dog may feel abandoned if left on a dog run without some ...


4

No, not really. They're not much more dangerous than any long leash. They may be a little more prone to breaking, because the retraction mechanism is a bit more delicate than a bit of rope. They're also usually thinner than a 'normal' lead, which means they're 'sharper' if something runs into them/gets clotheslined. I have very nearly come a cropper when ...


3

replace the clip with a carabiner, it's not quick release but much easier to handle than fighting a rusted spring with a little tab


3

No harness on a cat will truly be escape proof, but I have personally found two solutions that help reduce the escape risk substantially, in addition to other considerations offered in other answers First, you need to make sure the harness is correctly fitted. It must be snug around the chest, and positioned behind and under their elbows, not over them. If ...


3

Nothing is escape proof, the first consideration is the safety of the pet. Pick a harness that will not harm them. I go into a lot of detail about having rabbits out on a harness in How to leash train a rabbit? cats and rabbits have a lot in common when it comes to leash training. See that post for details. The two key points that apply to your situation:...


3

It looks to me like the one in your picture is one of the best there is on the market right now. Things to look for in a good harness are: double locking mechanisms, so if one fails the harness will still be secure; the harness must be comfortable for your cat to wear and not restrict the cats movement. The harness in your picture has Velcro and plastic ...


3

Is there any reason not to allow a cat out on a window that is leashed, harnessed and supervised? Can't see anything to worry about there - it would be a strangulation risk if the leash was attached to a neck collar but a properly fitted harness is no problem. Is the bed thing anything to worry about? I wouldn't say so - unless she's showing other signs ...


3

Getting them accustomed to the harness isn't an overnight task. Whenever you have them out of their enclosure, make sure to put it on and give them a treat when you do it so they associate the harness with good things. When they start to wiggle out of it, you can try scruffing them before they succeed to discourage the behavior. The important thing is to be ...


2

You need this kind of leash to plug into the lock of the seatbelt. Then your dog will not "fly through the car" at the backseat. Of course in combination with a harness and not a collar. To seatbelt a dog in the way a human would do is dangerous because the belts position is fitting the human body structure and would give the pressure of breaking ...


2

It sounds like your dog needs: Basic obedience training Re-conditioning when it comes to other dogs If your dog is reliable with basic commands, putting her into a down/stay position will prevent her from jumping around and barking (most dogs aren't able to bark loudly while laying down). It doesn't sound like your dog is reliable, otherwise I assume you ...


2

I think there are many downsides to retractable leashes and not many upsides. The first thing that comes to mind is that you're not promoting good behavior in your dog. I want my dog to be right by my side when I have her on a leash. There is nothing I want her doing away from me, and that includes sniffing around. I've said in other posts that a dog has a ...


2

Cables need to be carefully placed to avoid entanglement, but we never leave our dog on it alone and unsupervised. It is just for when we are at home. Also, use a harness rather than a collar to best ensure no lethal entanglement or neck injury. Every once in a while our dog used to go airborne chasing something when she got to the end. Seems to have ...


2

I agree it depends on breed and individual temperament. A Basenji should never be left unattended on any lead for long. We set up a similar system, and after an hour she was snarling and squealing and had rubbed off neck hairs with a little blood. Indeed, some dogs are happy like that. My mom currently wants her new rescued Miniature Schnauzer set up in a ...


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