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7

The Koi simply won't eat the food if it's too cold, they know their metabolism isn't fully functional and therefore they couldn't process the food. The Koi will likely sit on the bottom and the sturgeon (if hungry) will come up. Just feed sparingly and none of the food will fall to the Koi, not that they'd be interested anyway. If the Koi are still active ...


4

What I think might have happened before your koi started to die is this. As the temperature in your pond got above 20 °C, the koi eggs started to mature, and after some days of temperature still rising, the koi might have spawned (releasing the eggs into the water). Koi eggs are light green, so they can be really hard to see in the water. As these eggs ...


3

In researching another answer, I found this guide speaking about feeding fish in winter. Here are a few paragraphs to give some context. (It's a guide aimed at koi and/or goldfish pond owners, in case you were wondering why it says don't feed your fish at all.) As the water temperature of your pond falls, the fish will require less food. Watch their ...


3

First of all your tank is way too small. The minimum tank for one baby koi is 100 liters and this is for the first year you have it. Goldfish need about the same amount of water for one fish but they grow slower. If you start with a 100 liter tank for one fish you add 50 liters for each new fish (this is for both koi and goldfish). When you get the ...


3

I have a pond with koi. We have had two hail storms (in ten years) that required replacement of our roof shingles twice which the insurance adjuster authorized; so serious hail. No problem with koi or the tropicals (mollies, danios, etc.) I have inadvertently killed koi by covering most of the pond, slowing oxygen exchange. Hail hitting the pond would ...


2

First increase aeration to maximze oxygen in the water. Stop feeding your fish to lower the waste production. Clean your filter and remove waste from the bottom of your pond to lower the production of toxic gasses. Do a large waterchange up to 50% of the water and remember to use dechlorinator(pond safe)or simmilar products before you start to fill your ...


2

We live in the Northeastern U.S. and there are no alligators in our state or any of the surrounding states. Our fake alligator works great. We originally used it for raccoons which were eating the koi from our pond, but it also has worked for herons and geese as well. While I'm sure that some herons and geese may have had an encounter with a real gator when ...


2

Yes it will work but,yes there is a but it will not work in the long run herons learn over time so you can not be sure of the effect over time. You might try an motion activated sprinkler one bonus with this is it works on more types of predators. You might try to put up one of the fence solutions used around flowerbeds close to your pond to make it harder ...


2

To treat wounds on koi you can use surface painting (applying it directly on the wound of your fish). This is first aid to your fish to avoid infection of the wound; in addition to this, you have to make sure the water parameters are good to be sure you give the fish the best chance of surviving. You can buy potassium permanganate solution in any pharmacy ...


1

I have had many Koi over the years and they are very non-combative. They won't even eat bit-size fish in the pond with them . Are there any other fish in the tank? Normally , if fish fight , the first damage is to fins. As stated , looks like disease.


1

It looks to me like your koi is having an ulcer or starting to develop one, this is not unusual in koi sadly there is no really effective cure for this. The picture showing the left side of the fish is showing many lost scales and there is an area that looks like it has sunken in a little, this why I think it might be an ulcer there but I am not sure about ...


1

is your fish the one in the picture, I presume so? If so, how long was it taken before the fish died? It is swollen, as a female would be with eggs. Were the scales protruding a bit, like a pine cone when it opens? Your photo is not clear enough for me to really judge. If they were it could be dropsy, or the pine cone disease. It is caused by a bacteria ...


1

Yes. It does need treatment. As with an injury to any living being, this may get infected. You need to quarantine this fish immediately, and begin treatment. First of all, move this fish to a separate tank, such as a spare fish tank, or a tub. Use water from your original fish tank in this (do not use fresh or new tap water). Set up an air-stone in the tank....


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