14

Most important lessons -- outside of litterbox, which luckily comes naturally to most cats with just a bit of encouragement -- are practical ones. 1) Some surfaces are Not For Kitty. Food prep and serving surfaces are off limits in my house. One of the bookshelves likewise because it usually isn't stable enough. The cats learned this, after being told "NO! ...


11

It is hard to say how animals "miss" others, because we cannot really talk to them. But what struck me is the 6 weeks and 2 siblings already being gone! Even when the kittens are weaned, they are still learning social behavior from their mother! Minimum age to separate a kitten from the mother is 8 weeks, 12 weeks is better. Now that this is out of the ...


10

There are a lot of generalized guidelines for what to feed your dog, and how often. It is best to look at the directions of the food you are feeding for their recommendations, and overall to make sure you are feeding them a healthy brand of food, without any unhealthy fillers like corn or wheat. From Dog Breed Info (for adult dogs): Although it differs ...


9

I am so sorry your lost your little friend. I know how bad that can hurt. Outdoor cats (and all animals) often live very harsh and short lives. There are a number of diseases such as FIP that can affect a cat’s nervous system causing paralysis, spasms and convulsions. They can catch these diseases from other cats, other animals or just the outdoor ...


8

The best way to really tell is by feeling your dog. Until you have some experience with it you can ask a dog trainer, groomer, breeder or your vet for some help... just let them know you want an honest answer and don't take it personally if they say your dog is a little on the heavy or light side. I have had a lot of people ask but then be a little hurt when ...


8

Short answer: you don't. Reason 1: nutritional needs. Dogs, just like humans, need a varied diet including the right amount of protein, fiber, fat, minerals, vitamins and other nutritions. Dogs evolved from wolves, who get their nutrition almost exclusively from animals they hunt. They evolved to extract nutrients from muscle meat, intestines, skin, ...


7

Long ago, I had a kitten with similar behavior. I had gotten it particularly to catch mice. It just had no interest in chasing things. I even put the kitten in a large area with a live mouse and the kitten just ignored the mouse. I gave the kitten to some friends who wanted a cat for a pet, and I adopted an adult cat who was a proven mouse catcher. A ...


7

I’m really glad that you’ve stepped up to take care of this poor little thing but you must get her to a rescue center or an emergency vet asap. Newborn kittens can’t regulate their own body heat and rely on their mothers for that. Till the time you get her the medical help she needs, place her next to a soft toy of some sort with something warm in there. ...


6

As I commented, I think this is more of a developmental milestone issue as opposed to specific ages but there is a reasonable rule of thumb. As with all of us, maturation may happen at different rates and it's really more important for you to know when a given puppy is ready for adoption. So, some milestones periods to consider: Separation of a puppy from ...


6

You need to make sure the mother is on a lactating diet. I've learned in the pet food business that lactating mothers have the highest need of nutrition over all other life stages. Also when you start the puppies on solid food, try wetting the food first and make sure its a puppy specified diet. An 'All life stages' food is okay but not optimal for the ...


6

Depending on your country call a vet or a licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator. They will be able to tell you what to do and where to bring the animal. Taking care of a wild bird is not simple and needs experience which Wildlife Centres for example have. They will raise the bird and release it back into the wild. Depending on your location (if you add that I ...


5

You still need to get the cat to a vet to get this diagnosed and treated, but not only for your current problem, but to get the cat vaccinated and spayed/neutered. When you get a cat you take on the responsibility of providing all the care a cat needs for the next 20 years or more. Your cat does have an infection and needs treatment, so it does need a vet; ...


5

To cut my backstory short: we adopted two feral cats in April. They're incredibly shy. In October, we adopted another feral cat (we took him in from the street). The third cat is the most extraverted cat I've ever seen, he approached our girls immediately and they obviously did not like that. Everything I mention is based on our experiences, which have ...


5

So, as a general rule, you should expect that the puppy is getting sufficient nutrition in the early stages of growth from the milk supplied by the mother. However, the health and general condition of the mother plays a role here. It's important to ensure that she is sufficiently looked after to ensure that she produces sufficient milk for the litter and ...


5

Yes, this is absolutely normal; no, your baby isn't narcoleptic. Puppies sleep a lot -- just like babies and toddlers. If you take a look at this source, the estimated amount of sleep that a 16-week-old puppy should get is 18-20 hours/day. Gathering from my own personal experience and various sources across the web, I'd say the number is closer to 15-19 ...


4

For new dog owners, it is often very confusing to decide how much should they feed their pet. Here are some guidelines that will help you decide: 1- As you are currently feeding Blue 1/4 a day. I suppose it's one time in a day. You may increase it to 2 times in a day. See the reaction of the puppy and slowly and gradually make it 3-4 times a day. It would ...


4

Great that you try to make friends with this kitten. Most of the things you described are really good (One brief note: Don't feed a cat or kitten cow's milk, if you can't watch in which way it influences the cat. Cats mostly don't tolerate milk. See this question). Give her some privacy Giving the kitten food is very helpful. But don't try to touch the ...


4

Because a month really isn't a very long time. The kitten is a little over a month old and from the sounds of it has been abandoned by its mother, it's really not surprising that it's a little wary. Keep feeding the kitten and do as much as you can to appear non-threatening. Making only nice, slow movements and trying to stay low to the ground (think how ...


4

There is a delicate balance between overseeing your cockatiels' hatchlings, and causing them stress. If the parents get stressed, or feel like they're in danger, they will stop caring for (even kill) their babies. Usually they will do this when they're still eggs, like if the breeder is looking into their nest too often, but it's possible that something is ...


4

You should leave the nest as it is. Looking at pictures of pigeon nests, it seems absolutely normal that they don't have a soft and fluffy "bed". As a general rule, you should not interfere with the way wild animals live or raise their babies. If the birds decided that this nest is enough, you should trust them. The worst thing you could do is: ...


4

If the underlying cause of the behavior is a lack of food (due to it being denied), is there a practical way to resolve it with rather limited manpower? There are two ways to solve misbehavior: fix the underlying problem that causes the misbehavior, or tell (force) the cat to stop behaving this way. The former is much preferred. Since its behavior is ...


4

You could use a gentle heat lamp (ensuring the actual heating elements, which can burn, can't be touched by animals), or use rubber hot water bags or heated socks full of rice (you can microwave these) covered with cloth in a way that is safe and appealing to them! Online you may be able to find heat pads that hold heat better than water/rice, and there are ...


4

I have a female cat, also from a shelter, who is a near perfect litterbox user in the sense that she never intentionally eliminates outside the box, but she has for her whole life exhibited the same behaviors you mentioned: incomplete squat, ineffective digging and covering. Unfortunately my attempts to teach her to cover her leavings (by using the litter ...


3

I've seen that before as well and couldn't find any significant reason that's directly obvious. The only one I could come up with are indeed the ingredients: A puppy needs a different relative amount of calcium and phosphorus (more calcium) since the young dog's body won't be able to control the ratio as well as an adult dog.


3

This depends on various factors which is probably why the advice is conflicting. Factor 1: Is your puppy comfortable being in the crate open/closed? Some puppies take easier to crate training than others. If your puppy is still very uncertain or unhappy with being in the crate with the door closed, or being in the crate at all, then rather leave the door ...


3

In any case of severer life threatening illness your vet should be your first choice for medical assistance in this case though you have indicated you are feeding timothy hay based dark colored food pellets. These three related questions can assist you in balancing the diet of rabbit as it relates to alfalfa consumption and weaning. Is it true that alfalfa ...


3

As an anecdotal answer: don't react too quickly to your puppy willingness to eat quickly or lack of interest in eating his food quickly. My little boy has been eating extremely quickly from 2 to 3.5 months then was much slower and he's now back to the fast food drive-through mode. If you try to adapt too quickly you're likely to create more weight problem. ...


3

Step one: Don't leave a puppy unattended for long periods of time. A puppy can't hold it for too long (this is why there's pee and poo around your house) You can't train him if your away for so long Crate won't help, unless you're there to train him, which you're not. Step two: Try to be committed to the dog, having a dog is a HUGE responsibility, he is ...


3

As an addition to Flater's answer: It is not practical for us to feed all of the cats separately. Feeding many animals from one bowl or in one tight spot creates stress because the weakest are forced to wait for the strongest to finish before they can eat. You should put out many small bowls of food and spread them over a larger area so even the weakest ...


3

Yes, you should let a vet have a look at the wound as soon as possible. It could be bacteria that grew inside the healing wound without you noticing until they started attacking the tissue now. There's a slim chance that your dog could heal without medication, but this wound is clearly infected and painful for your pet. In the worst case the bacteria will ...


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