24

The article "Integrating Kittens with Cats" (W.V. Cats) provides intricate details on a procedure for introducing kittens to adult cats. According to the article, the paraphrased steps (backtrack to the prior step if there is an issue) are: Keeping the new kitten / cat separate from the household for multiple days. Providing scents from each feline ...


22

I would really urge you to see a professional dog trainer that you trust, with experience with aggressive dogs, and have him assess your dogs and help you out. But after reading a bit more detail about your situation here than what you gave in another question on why he lunges at children, I'll take a guess at your dog's previous history, which might go ...


21

The Humane Society of the United States has a few suggestions to prepare your pet. Some of them sound a little silly, but they do work. One of the most important things is getting the pet used to the new noises and sounds the baby will make - a lot of pets will find baby cries and the like upsetting. You can play crying sounds and the like to acclimate the ...


20

You have a cat, you both are going to be working more and you have an allergic roommate? I'm sorry, but are you sure it's a good idea to get a second cat? I understand it looks like choosing between two evils here, but I'd ask you to reconsider. I'd definitely wait till the move is complete. Moving is already stressful for a cat, I doubt it will be easier ...


19

I am active in the local rabbit rescue and humane society. This answer is based on multiple conversations with many cross species pet parents. All the points made are from experiences shared by parents and supported by reliable references where available. In my opinion and experience a rabbit & cat are probably the two easiest animals to join together ...


17

It’s a difficult question; neither choice is clearly right or wrong. I would lean toward getting him a friend now, and the same age or younger. The smaller the newcomer, the less your existing cat will see it as a threat in his territory. I assume your cat is already fixed, but if not, I’d do that first. Having a small space is a challenge, but remember that ...


16

I would say start by familiarizing the dog with the baby's scent. Bring an item that contains your baby's scent, such as a burp rag before bringing the baby around the dog. Have the dog sniff it from a distance at first preferably. By doing this, you are communicating to your dog that the item is yours and then giving permission for the dog to sniff. This ...


14

Tl;dr - Dogs decide a lot of things solely by how it smells. Let the animals get used to the smells of each others, and keep the dogs calm no matter what the cat does. The long version: I have brought a cat, and then some more cats, to our home where we already had two dogs for several years as our only pets. Every cat was brought in the same way. First ...


14

I wouldn't recommend it. The advice on how much space you need per cat is pretty variable, from one bedroom per cat to various square footage per cat. And even then, you might have trouble with getting some cats to share space no matter how big it is. However, one bedroom and bathroom sounds very small to me, especially when you consider that the advice on ...


12

I'm sorry you lost your male cat. Getting another cat will be good for both you and your female cat. I would get an adult cat, not a kitten. A mature cat will likely be calmer, and less likely to annoy your cat. Plus, you'll be able to determine the cat's temperament. And you'll be giving a home to an adult cat (they are harder to find homes for than ...


11

Is it true that ferrets don't get along with other pets? The answer is a qualified "no". I had two ferrets. The oldest was always, always happy to make new friends, regardless of the species. He was very excited to play with any new dog or cat he met, and would do the ferret "bounce" that typically indicates play. My other ferret was more curious than ...


11

You should definitely ask before just showing up with a pet in tow. The answer will probably depend on the type of pet. My local shelter arranges "meet and greet"s for dogs, so it's probably possible for your dog to meet a potential adoptee dog. Cats really don't do well out of their homes (and I notice that they don't have feline "meet and greet"s). For ...


10

Dogs in a pack tend to seek security, predictability, and everybody playing a role. One of these roles is that of the pack leader which undoubtedly at least one dog will claim. The pack leader owns everything and everybody in the pack. He or she will assert on other pack members by displaying acts of dominance: Guarding a particular toy Always eating ...


10

Initial shyness is normal. Cats often rely on knowing their environment. Bringing them to a new environment will have them on edge until they find their bearings. But more importantly, cats are territorial animals. Your new cat will definitely smell your first cat. Add onto it that it's a male (they can smell the difference), and that strongly incentivizes ...


9

First, I'd suggest taking a look at the answers to these questions: How can I encourage my kitten to leave my adult cat alone? Can't tell if cats are playing with or hunting each other My older cat is very aggressive towards my 6 week old kitten How to get cats to coexist in peace? Your new kitten is very young (ideally they shouldn't leave their ...


9

Strongly advise against it. Cats need space. Research how much territory a cat has in nature (male and female differ a great deal here) and you'll realize just how tiny even a large house is to a cat's instincts. One room? Seriously, that is cruelty to animals. Putting two cats into one room is insanity. Like humans, they sometimes get along and sometimes ...


8

Give your cat a high place where he can observe the dog and feel safe in that the blasted canine can't reach him. This will serve as a safe haven. Also make sure there are at least 2 different ways to get out of that safe haven so the dog can't lay in ambush. During feeding time use put the food on 2 sides of a door opened to a gap, and let the cat start ...


8

The reason you confine cats to a small room initially is to not overwhelm them with new (new objects, new scents, new movement, etc). A smaller room has less new and so is less overwhelming. Ultimately, the choice of where to confine a new cat will depend on number of new cats if there are multiple cats, how well bonded they are any potential health ...


7

That would only be sensibly possible if you were only able to get a log of locations/routes after physical retrieval of the tracker, ie.you have got your collar back. If you want 'real-time' tracking, then the GPS position data has to be transmitted to a server, and then to you. The cellular networks are the only pervasive, cheap-ish, power-effective means ...


6

Sorry to hear that, my condolences on your loss. :( Guinea pigs are definitely social animals (almost too social, it's how I ended up with 7 once before getting them sexed correctly), so being solo is going to be harder on your friend now than it would have been at a much earlier age. They do grieve, I think, based on my own experience with them, but the ...


6

To create a 'pack smell' might speed up a possible behavior change towards acceptance: stroke the face of the male with a tissue, then let the female smell it while you feed her something nice and then stroke her face with this tissue too, bring it back to him - feeding him and stroking her smell on his face at the same time (connecting the smell of the ...


6

They know not only that there is a cat on the other side, but if there is a gap under the door, they can smell who it is. This is actually a suggested way of getting cats to know each other (have them separated by a barrier) the preferred thing is a screen door but as they can tell who is who by smell a gap under a door is fine. Gradually they will ...


6

Cats are not like dogs, who will generally want to hang out together after a short intro (especially when they are as young as these cats are). They are more territorial and wary of stranger cats. If they are together from a very young age they can bond very well and quickly, but after that it takes a lot more introduction time. My advice is to go slowly ...


6

As you probably noticed ferrets are extremely social creatures. If you have ever neglected them and didn't give them attention due to being sick or such you would have noticed that they get angry at you for not giving them enough attention. And when they are angry they might even start biting you(it hurts a lot). Yes they are awake only for 8 hours at most ...


6

@Oldcat is correct. In the wild, wild cats like the leopard take care and teach their cubs to hunt; once the cubs reach a certain age, the mother will force the cubs to leave. When the mother is pregnant again with a second batch of cubs, she will attack her offspring (any of her cubs from her previous litters) and treat them as a threat. Unlike humans, ...


6

Yes, you can reintroduce them! It can be a very lengthy process though, but I'm sure you know that. Begin by keeping them separated as you have. Idealy so that they cannot see eachother. Have them eat their favourite food on different sides of the door as close to the door as possible without haveing them react negatively. Sideswapping can also be good (...


6

Gender and size have little to do with bonding. It is all about personality, everybunny has a different personality and some just won't ever be friends with each other. It sounds like your basic approach to bonding has some research behind it. We also have a few Q&A that address rabbit bonding so I won't go into details about that. Take a look at what ...


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