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The outcome of an untreated fracture does largely depend on the nature of the fracture. There are many factors at play, including whether the fracture is open or closed, the stability on the fracture, and whether the leg is rested. A simple, stable fracture can often heal uneventfully without surgery. Splinting can be helpful in some cases. Pain management ...


4

If it's a clean fracture and the cat has sufficient time and nutrition to heal, it will just heal. If the cat is malnourished it will take longer to heal and the fractured bone hinders the cat even more in its search for food, possibly leading to starvation. If the bone isn't aligned or is disturbed during the healing process, the mended bone can become ...


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In human medicine, if you don't treat a broken bone, it might end healing on its own, albeit slower and more painfully, or it might never heal at all, the broken bones will continue to cause pain, and the limb will never be usable, at least as long as it continues to be untreated. It's also possible that even if the person chose to only delay treatment, that ...


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As @Harry V. suggested in a related post, the shards turned out to be bullet/pellet fragments. More specifically, they appear to be shards of a lead BB pellet. Radiology report: In the left proximal tibia and fibula there are highly comminuted fractures and mild displacement, moderate soft tissue swelling and a large amount of metal debris at the fracture ...


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In addition to the given answers, healing a horse's broken leg is usually combined with hanging the horse off the ceiling in a sling, so it is forced to rest its feet. This measurement would need to be done over roughly half a year, and many horses would pass away with a colic due to this. Also, amputation as mentioned below is questionable; horses live in ...


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I am a vet who sees a lot of cats each day. To examine a cat who tends to bite or scratch, there are a few things I do commonly: Go slow and gentle. Cats don't like sudden movement. Let the cat acclimatise to the exam room for a few minutes if possible. Avoid tugging them out their carrier - either let them come out on their own, or take the carrier apart ...


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