15

Assuming this isn't a joke, that is a fox. If you want to make absolutely sure, and assuming you can check safely, check the eyes. Foxes have slit pupils when they're contracted, like a cat's. Dogs always have rounded pupils. Since this is a wild animal, however, do not handle it, and those who have interacted with it should possibly seek medical ...


8

Looks like a damselfly larvae to me, which isn't actually a parasite. It is, however, carnivorous... If your fish were larger, this larvae could have turned into food for them, but not in this case as you have small fish. So, as it is they can be dangerous to your fish and shrimp, so best to make sure you get them out of the tanks as soon you find them. ...


7

You have a microchip, so presumably you live in a part of the world were it is reasonable to expect a lost cat will be scanned, by either the local vet or rescue. Only you can decide if a collar is appropriate for your cat. Putting a collar on a cat has risks. see Collar Hazards & Cat Collar Injury (a couple random picks from google there are lots ...


6

Your vet will have registered most of the information about your cat on his PC, and the chip number contains information about the producer of the chip plus the unique number of the chip/cat. Your vet will have to contact the company to get a copy of the papers for the chip, but this is your vet's problem and not yours. The vet can probably download the ...


6

You can do a DNA test. Get the DNA of the parent and test it against the alleged child and see if it matches. You can google DNA test for dogs and there are lot of links. You can probably call your vet to ask and see where you can do this test that's closest to you. If the other side declines a DNA test, then it's probably a good idea to not pursue this. ...


6

Yes, you should put an orange collar on your strictly-indoor cat to mark him as an escaped convict. Check out The Kitty Convict Project While having your kitty micro chipped is awesome, many lost kitties never get reported or brought in to the shelter to be scanned as outdoor cats are so common. While this project is still catching on, the orange collar ...


5

We have tried putting harnesses on our cats, then immediately taking them outside on a lead. That way they are excited about getting to see what's out there and not really paying any attention to lead/harness. After a couple of minutes, we bring them back in and take their leads off, leaving them with their harnesses on for extended periods of time so ...


4

The chip number is important but so is the name of the company who stores the microchip information. If ever you move you will need to contact the company to change the information, it is also good to have a copy of the paperwork in case mistakes were made when registering your pets. It will give you the opportunity to fix any errors.


4

it is a large pimple or a small abcess,an infection in the skin. it can be painful or get painful quickly so i suggest you take your cat to a vet. the vet will make an small incision to drain it your cat will most likely not need any antibiotics after this procedure. this will be done under local anesthetics so your cat will not feel any discomfort from ...


4

Here are my two best techniques for identifying a fish: Reading materials about the most common aquarium fishes. Websites or books often list the most common aquarium species with pictures. I have a book at home called "the bible of aquarium fishes" that has pages for many different tetras, cichlids, cories, catfishes, betta, guppy, platy, etc. ...


4

Domestic Shorthair Tabby Thanks to @Stig Tore. But that says very little if any thing about your cat. Other than that it's a cat: domesticated from wild cats with a certain pattern to their fur. Now, if you could take it to a cat show judge, you might get a better estimate. They do know their stuff better then some internet stanger(s). In the end, if you ...


4

Your tank is not properly cycled yet. Take this a bit slower, do not add any animals to your tank until it is properly cycled. The gray you can see in your tank is bacteria starting to grow. It is normal to have this in the beginning before the tank is in biological balance. The gray stuff will go away after a few days and it is not only bacteria, but ...


3

You did too many things in too little time. Maybe you want to take a step back and do things gradually. In that way, you will be able to better understand the source of your problems. Move everything is a different vessel(s) (can even be larger glass jars). Properly clean and disinfect the aquarium (gravel, filter, other accessories also); be sure to remove ...


3

I have had a few pets come into the hospital with foreign microchips (though not from Hungary) and the process goes like this. The chip does not switch companies - i.e if your chip was registered with 24petwatch it will stay with them forever. Each chip database has a specific code/number at the beginning so when scanning the chip each company can then tell ...


3

They're called knife fish. There are several varieties, the ones in your photo are called black ghost knife fish. The common varieties such as ghost knife fish are fairly easy to care for, but they need tank-mates who aren't going to pester them. Some of the larger species such as clown knife fish are completely unfit for the all but the largest home ...


2

I'd try initially applying the collar during an extended petting session, while the cat is effectively sedated... Just tried an around-the-neck grip on both of mine, who are curled up on me, and I think I could get away with it as long as I continued the massage thereafter. Not sure how they would react upon waking, though further distracting with a treat ...


2

John's answer is spot on. I'm pretty sure it was effectively a damselfly larvae. I want to add about how it possibly got in the tank and how I watched to tank the following weeks to ensure I catch them all. First, shortly before I saw this little guy for the first time I had purchased 2 new plants. As John pointed in his answer the larvae probably came ...


2

Personal opinion really is the answer to this question, but you have done the responsible thing and had the cat microchipped, which would be the first thing a vet or rescue centre would check. I have worked in a rescue centre for a number of years, and have seen some horrific injuries sustained to cats because of collars, ranging from dislocated forelimbs, ...


2

You can go to your vet hospital and they can send a blood sample off to a lab to do DNA testing, it's relatively cheap (30$ where I'm from) and you'll know for sure.


2

I'm not 100% sure, but this looks like a St. Bernhard breed of dog. Wikipedia describes them as: The St. Bernard or St Bernard (UK: /ˈbɜːrnərd/, US: /bərˈnɑːrd/) is a breed of very large working dog from the western Alps. They were originally bred for rescue at the Great St Bernard Pass on the Italian-Swiss border, and Little St Bernard Pass in the ...


1

Were you sure to wash everything thoroughly before adding them to the tank? Even new items/plants need to be cleaned off before adding. I believe you possibly have some variation of thread algae. Thread algae survives on decaying organic matter within your tank. Generally these are removed with a thorough tank clean but on most occasions they are harmless ...


1

Pedigree Papers If you got your cat from a registered cattery, then the breeder should have provided you pedigree papers establishing its breed. If sold as a kitten, the breeder may withhold the papers until you provide proof of spay/neuter; see your sales contract for details. This is the only certain proof that a cat is of a particular breed. Breed ...


1

It looks like some type of leech and there is about 500 types that live in water. Some of them feed on the body fluid from snails and others feed on body fluids from fish or other animals that live in or come in contact with water. It is impossible to identify it from your picture. Another possibility is it might be a type of nemathode. Some can be ...


1

It is a tick. They do transfer to all animals living on land. They need blood to live and reproduce. They can make you and your animal ill, they can transfer serious disease and even kill you or your animal. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tick It is best to remove it as soon as you see one, to limit the possibility of serious infection in you and your ...


1

A lot depends on how they were kept, as to what happened to your gourami. They are tropical, as prior commented while these shubunkin goldfish are cooler water fish, as also commented :) Most goldies prefer 72-75F for their waters, so many lower state residents don't have to use heaters that often unless they get into colder climate seasons. These guys are ...


1

No, cats' paw prints are not unique (fun fact: Their nose prints are, but that's not exactly practical in your situation) and anyway, getting a paw print off carpet is going to be very difficult. A cat's meow is rather more individual, but it's going to be tricky to use for this situation. Similarly to babies' cries, the owner/parent grows used to ...


1

You say in your edit that you're travelling to the EU. It may exist slight differences between countries but to my knowledge : Cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) belong to the Appendice III of the so called Washington Convention or CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species). This means that you have virtually no legal obligation to ...


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