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14

I have had pet cats kill rabbits and eat them many times over the years. It isn't rare at all as rabbits thrive in modern subdivisions on the ornamental plants and grasses while mice and rats are less frequent. So in the morning or evenings you will see rabbits hanging out all over the place. These rabbits are not all young and small, although some were. ...


12

The reason that she does this is she considers you to be part of her pack and is bringing you food as a gift. I read somewhere that it's because she thinks you need help feeding yourself, so she's trying to help you. Though it's a valid concern, it's actually your cat showing you that she loves you. She clearly did play with them before because she hunts ...


9

You don't say how old your cats are - as kittens, they would have been eager to chase and catch any bugs just for the play value. As older cats, they're more set in their ways and having spent a while where most of the insects they encountered were nasty (the noxious odors), they would probably have come to the conclusion that small flying things are bad ...


8

The average housecat can run at speeds roughly 30mph (48kph) though when looking for the fastest housecat I found the Egyptian Mau, which seems to be a part wildcat similar to Bengals and Ocicats. It's said to run at speeds around 36mph (57kph). The range of rabbit speeds seems to be a lot broader at 30-45mph (48-72kph), but that's because the different ...


8

The bell will not prevent your cat from hunting. It my make it a little harder for her to sneak around, but my cat wears a bell and still brings dead voles and mice home regularly. The bell is more to prevent him from sneaking up on us than the birds. The best thing you can do is "replace" the hunting action for her. Buy a couple cat toys (or make your own ...


7

There is no unequivocal right or wrong answer to what you asking. You simply have to decide what you think and feel is right here. Many people believe animal's lives have value, that they should have the right to peruse their own interests as much as possible, and that undue animal suffering should be prevented and mitigated where possible. Many view these ...


6

The only way to keep your cat from hunting and killing other animals is to keep them inside. The question How can I prevent my cat from killing animals and birds? shows that putting a bell on the cat is not 100% effective. The cat will still hunt, the bell may or may not give the other animals sufficient notice to escape. We have the existing question ...


6

Long ago, I had a kitten with similar behavior. I had gotten it particularly to catch mice. It just had no interest in chasing things. I even put the kitten in a large area with a live mouse and the kitten just ignored the mouse. I gave the kitten to some friends who wanted a cat for a pet, and I adopted an adult cat who was a proven mouse catcher. A ...


5

Play is almost universal among animals with large enough brains to react/interact creatively with their siblings and surroundings. It is far from being specific to humans, and not limited to juveniles. Zoos have learned that providing "enrichment activities" for animals makes them happier, healthier, and less frustrated. At its base, play is enjoyment in ...


4

My cats are very aggressive at play. Even after several years together, they still chase, tackle, wrestle, pin, and bite with a great deal of vocalization that sounds like they are tearing each other apart. It has never been a problem — they are the best of friends and get along famously — but here is what I look for to make sure play-aggression ...


4

While cats usually enjoy chasing rodents, my understanding is that cats aren't particularly fond of eating them. Most cats would rather play with them than eat them, and I don't think there's any practical way for you to teach them to kill. And not that you suggested it, but it would be cruel to deny her food to try to get her to kill them. I think that ...


4

Never shout at your cat. She will never understand what her fault is and will instead become afraid of you. Your cat loves you and considers you part of family. This the reason she is doing this. Otherwise she would have finished her food alone. She wants to share her prized catch with you, and she thinks the sight of delicious food offered by her to you ...


4

This really depends on the individual nature of your dog. Some dogs find hunting highly reinforcing, and the more of it they do, the more they want to do it. Practicing a behaviour makes it more likely that the dog will choose it over alternatives, particularly if there is an exciting pay-off like catching the rabbit. See David Ryan's book, '"Stop!" ...


3

Not having binocular vision will make judging distance more difficult. But just like humans, cats will try to find ways to work around that limitation, using size cues to estimate distances. There will obviously be loss of vision to one side, which again mar or may not be an issue depending on what/where/how they hunt. How successful they are will probably ...


3

Ethically... Your cat bring you a mouse: this is a gift it would bring its children too, to feed them, to train their hunting behavior. You have three ways here: kill it, dispose of it kill it, feed it let it go First point I think is disposing of the corpse referring to cycle of nature... Second point: Your cat brings it as food, if it does not eat ...


3

The safest answer is to keep your dogs from chewing on the hide... I admit I doubt any dog could withstand the (for them) tasty smell of a freshly tanned hide, but if you want to keep the rug for any amount of time, you absolutely need to tell your dogs in no uncertain terms that this is not food. Aside from that, the Native Americans traditionally tanned ...


3

Well. I don't know about personality changes, but you might want to take some precautions to prevent any health issues from cropping up, since rabbits and other wild animals can carry dangerous parasites and diseases. I would take your dog to the vet for a checkup, just to be on the safe side. Personality changes are unlikely, I'd imagine.


2

Yes kittens learn this from their mothers,But they will learn from experience too. The mother will bring dead prey to her kittens first and often throw it around a little in front of her kittens,this is to get the kittens interrested so they start to play with it. Later the mother will bring live prey to her kittens this is so they can learn how to do the ...


2

I taught my kitten how to hunt by balling up a piece of paper and fluttering it around in her face in an obnoxious manner until she'd bite and pounce at it in annoyance. After a while it turned into play and shed come running the moment she heard a paper crinkle. I started tossing it around and she would very aggressively chase and attack it. Eventually she ...


2

It is possible to train you cat to do tricks. It will take considerably longer than with a dog because you first have to convince the cat that learning is worth the effort. However, the only way I can think of to teach her to hunt for you us to reward her when she brings something home, and to increase her opportunities to find things to bring home (which ...


1

More interested in hunting, perhaps. "Hey, I actually caught one" That was fun, let's try that again." Other behaviour changes seem unlikely to arise. Why should they? Other dogs aren't rabbits, and know how to signal "that's enough, I'm done playing."


1

I have a good amount of rabbit around my house because I live in the Forest and my dog got her first rabbit in 11 years of being here and she has tried again but has been unsuccessful with it. I was always told that once they get the taste of blood they will do it again but I don't believe that because I see the rabbits in the yard with her laying there and ...


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