34

Wouldn't it be a better solution to protect the trees from the cat than to remove the cat from the family? First of all, it's impossible to teach a cat not to scratch on anything. The claws of cats grow in layers and must be shortened and sharpened. By scratching on hard, rough surfaces, preferably tree bark, cats shed the old outer layer of their claws, ...


18

First, my wife and I have experience with 11 feral cats over the past 10 years. I don't intend this as bragging but I know a great deal about feral cats, some of it learned the very hard way. Now, there are three types of cats you encounter outside: Cats whose owners let them roam - that is very dangerous in urban and suburban areas in the US. Brits - I ...


9

Treat this as a specialized case of introducing a new cat to a household: initial isolation plus gradual expansion should allow for a gentle introduction. When I moved my three adult cats some years ago, I didn't do this and boy did I regret it. I figured if I just opened the carriers in the basement in front of the litter boxes, with their food and water ...


8

Yes! It is absolutely humane! This kitty is very fortunate that he has lived this long. The average lifespan of an outdoor cat is only 4 years. After moving him, the first thing you must do is get him neutered. This will help his urge to go "catting around" at night. It will be difficult, and likely noisy (do to the howling when wanting outside), but ...


7

When you move into a new house, everything is new for your cat. If there has not been any other cats there before, she has the whole territory for herself. She feels free to go everywhere and marks it as her area by rubbing against everything. There are several things you can do when she wakes you at night, but treats are not one of them if you don't want ...


6

Consistency is key Moving fish/Amphibians is always going to be stressful for them. The best thing you can do to ensure that they are stressed as little as possible is to keep the conditions as similar as you can during the transport and beyond. Your key question is about the process of re-cycling the existing tank after the move. This shouldn't be ...


6

Cats should be kept indoors or have an outdoor cat pen to keep him and the wildlife safe. Cats are making many species of birds, lizards and some turtles go extinct. You will also have the risk of him getting lost (a microchip will help if he is found by someone else) or killed by bigger predators (foxes, eagles, coyotes etc.) and vehicles. If you decide ...


6

I had this same issue with our dog. It sounds like separation anxiety. We solved the issue by using counter conditioning. Basically, you want to make the thing she fears (your leaving) associated with something she loves. For our dog, it was a treat in a Kong. It takes our dog about 20 minutes to get the treat out of a Kong. When we left, we gave her ...


5

Since you only have a week before the move, I would wait until after your cat has been completely settled into your new place before you begin leash training. Cats aren't very good with stress, and, besides being obviously uncomfortable for them, can develop undesired behavior from too much stress like spraying, vomiting, excessive shedding, and so forth. ...


4

It's an old wives tale, but has a germ of truth in it. Cats do find grooming relaxing and stress relieving, as you can see whenever a cat makes a big mistake jumping or falling and instantly starts licking a paw...quickly at first, then slower as they calm down. But I don't know that it is any better than just putting the cats in a room in the back of the ...


4

So, six days is really the blink of an eye for a cat to settle into a new territory. Some rescues estimate that it can take up to six MONTHS for a cat to feel comfortable in a new environment. This behavior does not seem abnormal to me. I would recommend a vet visit just to check on your cat's health. Anxiety in a new territory can be increased by a loss of ...


4

A couple of weeks later, I have decided to tell you how I did it. It's been over a month since the transfer. The other two answers were good, but they simply didn't work in my case. Since the larger tank was over 5 times bigger, keeping old water wasn't really an option. You need movement in the water so it doesn't become stagnant, especially over a 2 week ...


4

I would move a week early. Going to a new place is traumatic for most cats, they need time to adjust and scent mark. As you said, boarding then new apartment would be doubly traumatic. If there is not enough time to get used to her to get used to the apartment, why would it be any better with boarding? In a boarding situation, there will be all sorts of ...


4

It's not like you're out looking for the cat, or even rewarding him with food. His owners let him outside, and likely know he's living his best cat life out in the world. It would be different if you bought him a collar, let him into your house, and refused to let him return to his original home. There's not much harm in petting the cat when he comes into ...


4

You should most definitely take the cat with you. The cat is dependent on you for food since you have been feeding her. If you are concerned about your cats being aggressive towards the stray, I would suggest that you allow her to be an outdoor cat (depending on where you are moving to, if you are moving to a suburban area that has lots of traffic or large ...


4

It's extremely important to keep your cat confined while the movers are at work. Her escaping the apartment is not the only hazard; she could also be stepped on by a worker, or something they are moving could be dropped on her, causing severe injury or death. Most cats don't care for carriers, but consider that one brief period of discomfort is better than ...


4

I'm pretty sure you're anticipating a problem where there is none. The scent of another dog is just one in a million unfamiliar scents your dog will be exposed to when moving into a new home, beside tons of other new impression the dog has to get used to. As long as the two dogs don't share some negative experiences with each other, the scent of the other ...


4

Cats are susceptible to cold just as a person is. By genetic analysis, we have determined house cats originate from the Middle East. They are not particularly adapted for the cold. Their ears, for instance, are if anything, designed to shed heat, with sparse and short hair, and jutting quite far from the head, with no particular adaptation to help cover ...


4

There are probably real reasons for them to seek a different place to sleep. Some that came to my mind are: Their bed gets wet at night from fog or dew and they found themselves a dry bed. Their beds are in an unprotected place and your dogs found a place that stays warmer at night. There are animals like cats, racoons or badgers visiting at night. Your ...


4

Feral and Outdoor are two different types of cats. One is "wild", and the other is a pet. I'd be hesitant to move feral cats, but if they are your pets, don't abandon them. I don't know you, these cats, or your daily interactions, but hopefully these help you understand the decision better. If you are moving any cat from it's space, you need to not only ...


4

If you are moving back to the old house with your cats they will remember it. There is absolutely no doubt about it. Cats have an excellent memory of places where they have been before. There are lots of examples where a cat has been lost for years and when they return, they know where every tree and bush is like it never was gone at all.


4

It is never a good idea to move a feral cat. But it might or it might not be a good idea to move a stray cat. The definition of stray and feral is not well established but I would say if she allows you to touch her and sleeps in your presence, she is more of a stray than feral. I compose this answer assuming she is stray, i.e., she allows you to touch her. ...


3

I did the exact same thing once, I moved out to a new apartment with my cat and there was an emergency at the day I was moving so I had to leave for a couple of days. What I did was; I confined her to a smaller room full of her favourite things & furnitures. This included my bed (she always sleeps with me), her toy collection, her favourite blanket ...


3

It's the same as when moving with fish really. Make sure the filter media remain submerge in water. For a short journey (as 1h) no need to have air pump running. Make you animal comfortable. This means a big enough container (bag, tupperware, etc) partially filled with water. Do the moving. You can empty the tank completely. Refill with de-chlorinated water ...


3

That's a tough dilemma - and not one that has an easy or straightforward answer. For most breeds 12 is relatively old but not decrepit, flying however is stressful and scary for them and for some breeds that have pug-style noses it can carry significant risk of them experiencing respiratory distress. A thorough check from a vet who knows of the intended plan ...


3

This will definitely vary dog to dog and can even affect their house training since they don't know where to go. If your dog seems to be taking a while to adjust introduce them to the new house like you would a puppy. Confine them to the most 'lived in' room first. Once they get used to that add more rooms. Show them where they need to relieve themselves ...


3

I think Rolf has a pretty good idea, but I don't see why you have to haul them in the larger tank if it's going to be a problem. You could just get a Rubbermaid tote with a locking lid and transfer them all in that. You could even get some fish transport bags from your local fish dealer and put them in there, just like when you buy them. Either way, they're ...


3

I normally move my cat(s), their bedding, their food, their litter box, and their toys all together, in the first trip. I shut them in a small place like a bathroom, and try not to disturb them until the day's moving activities are over. It also reduces the risk that they'll run out the door while you're moving furniture. Most small animals feel safer in a ...


3

Thank you for your question! Moving is very stressful for cats. You want them with you, while you're driving, so you can comfort them. They also need to be in an area where the temperature is regulated. It can get hot inside a carrier. SMALL, SOFT CARRIERS: You can put your kitties in smaller carriers so they will fit in the cab with you. They will ...


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