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8

You have a good reason to be concerned about deafness in your cat, according to International Cat Care, white cats with one blue eye have about 30-40% chance to have some amount of deafness. In cats, inherited congenital (present from birth) deafness is seen almost exclusively in white coated individuals. The deafness is caused by degeneration of the ...


7

We had a deaf cat, sadly passed away only about a month ago, and to be honest we didn't handle her any differently than our other cat. The things to bear in mind are: They're easier to surprise and every cat might react a little differently if startled, particularly from sleep. Ours just kind of jumped up, but others might be a bit more aggressive. They won'...


6

The Physical Theory dB is the scientific symbol for Decibel [A] unit of measurement used to express the ratio of one value of a power or field quantity to another, on a logarithmic scale. And The decibel is commonly used in acoustics as a unit of sound pressure level. Well, that doesn't sound useful at first... but it helps us understand a few things. ...


6

To answer your question about the frequency range of "vocal noises of communicative value", we would have to test not just what sounds the dogs make, but how other dogs interpret them. I'm not aware of anyone who's done exactly that. There are a number of studies on acoustic properties that carry information (e.g. Taylor,Reby, McComb. 2010. Size ...


5

My wife is concerned that "the music is too loud for the dog!" and constantly asking me to turn it down. Might it be the case that the music is too loud for your wife? ;^) Obviously dogs have more sensitive hearing than humans, but from my understanding of how sound and hearing works, all that means is that they've got a greater High Freq. range ...


4

Rabbits can hear sounds down to 96 Hz; this is a lot higher than the lowest frequency humans can hear--about 20 Hz. This is above the range of infrasound: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infrasound So rabbits cannot hear infrasound, but they can feel vibrations when you walk across the room. Rabbits can hear sound up to 49 kHz, and this is in the range of ...


4

She may not be able to necessarily hear the growling and hissing, but she may be responding to the non-verbal body language the older cat is using to indicate her displeasure. For example, the older cat's face is not going to look happy - so she could be responding to the way the cat's face looks angry, or how her body is positioned - there is so much ...


4

While you probably can't actually help him hear better you can use alternative ways to communicate. I would recommend getting a collar that vibrates and to teach your dog that the vibration is the signal to come find you. That way you can get his attention even if he can't see you. Also work on hand signals so that once you have his visual attention you can ...


4

We had a cat that was congenitally deaf. She was an indoor cat only. The major difference was that to call her, we would stomp on the floor. Other than that, she was a really active, curious, playful, normal kitty. No special attention needed.


4

I bet millions of cats are named with names like "Sam". Are they less well trained? I bet no (But I have no proof either). Let us focus on the reason Chris C. Pinney gives you for his suggestion: This will allow it to differentiate between its name and those one syllable commands you may choose to teach it. What is a name? As a human, we identify ...


3

No, dogs are not more or less sensitive to sound than humans (dogs in general do hear about the same sound frequency range as we do), but their hearing is better so this is not about the sound level, it is more about the type of sound. It is the rumbling sound made when you are driving on the motorway that can have a calming effect on your dog, it does have ...


3

The most probable explanation is that he connects the noise with the ball and with play time and fun. His "Chewbacca sound" is probably an invitation to play, maybe mixed with a slight note of indecision because he would really like to have the ball right now but you're playing with it and he doesn't know how to get it from you. There are several ...


3

Short answer: yes. What you intend to do is Classical Conditioning and works just like clicker training. Your cat will probably need a few days to learn that a certain frequency means food, but it will surely learn. Long answer: I really like your idea, but I think you need to adapt it to the physiology and needs of a cat. Cats hear better than humans, ...


2

Can cats learn to associate tones to food, water, litter box, etc? I would think so. Cats are infamous for coming running when they hear a can opener; that's not instinct but a very specific sound they've learned means food. Multiple tones may take a little longer to get the different associations straight, but worst case he just tries each tone in turn ...


2

Yes, your dog can "sense" thunder. Simple science is behind this intelligence of picking up weather conditions by dogs. Dogs are capable of sensing the barometric pressure drop and any shift in static electric field. Change in air pressure and electricity are indications of adverse weather. As quoted by this article They can also sense the atmosphere'...


2

Simply speaking, when a dog barks, the positive pressure on the ear canal created by the physical motions of the bark close off, protecting the ear; much the same as you covering your ears. From Per Jensen, "The Behavioral Biology of Dogs." ...the utricle is activated immediately before a dog starts to bark and therefore offers protection to its own ear ...


2

As everyone points out, no difference really. To call attention you will have to change sound waves to another type (both clapping and stomping) and cause air pressure waves to which cats have relative sensitivity (stomps in my opinion are better). One precaution though, do not let the cat to go outside unattended, as he is far more likely to fall prey to ...


1

I’d be curious to know where you got your dachshund (to learn about it’s early rearing), and how long you’ve had him at home with you. If your doxie is successfully socializing with larger dogs - fantastic. Just be sure that none are playing too roughly and putting him at risk of (back) injury. You didn’t mention how well trained this dog is, but if you ...


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