6

Cats naturally have thinner fur in that area, and if you look at the head at just the right angle, it can look almost bald like the photo. On some cats (especially those with darker fur, because of the contrast with the paler skin underneath) it's more noticeable than others. If you look at the cat from another angle, the fur usually looks fairly normal. If ...


4

Almost all mamals do have nipples just like it is in human female/males. The number of mamarian nipples in cats are normaly 6 to 8 but it can vary from 4 to 10 and the numbers are not always even. More about this here:https://kittyclysm.com/cat-nipples/ if you google cat nipples you will find a lot of information about it. So the answer to your question ...


4

The options of treatment in this case is not only limited but also expensive. If it is hereditary then although there is no treatment, rest assured that your cat is fine. You may want to check with the pet shop for this information. Otherwise as per information provided by you in your comments, your cat's condition is serious. After ruling out other ...


3

We see a few cats come in like this, could be a number of things like parasites (parasite control always recommended for outdoor pets). If he is outdoors he could have gotten into a scrap with another animal or come in contact with a toxic substance. Could even be the beginning of allergies or ringworm (fungal infection that can be transmitted to people). ...


3

I once measured the amount of fur my normal 4,5-5kg cat shed in one week, it was 5,45 grams of medium length fur (it is the amount from the brush I used, so the real amount of fur shed is higher than what I collected). Kittens will normally start to shed their baby fur at 6-12 months of age, some cats shed more fur in the spring and fall and other cats shed ...


3

The phenomenon of hair loss in that area is called facial alopecia, and it's a normal pattern of hair loss when cats age. There are also scent glands around the face area, which cats enjoy rubbing on things, which may contribute even more to the hair loss in that area. I should note though that sometimes hair loss in that area can also be related to some ...


2

Your dog is affected by a phenomenon called “post-clipping alopecia,” which (as you acknowledge) can occur after a dog is improperly groomed. (All emphases are mine.) Post Clipping Alopecia, Harbourview Animal Hospital This is a condition that is very common in the fur bearing breeds. The fur bearers such as Alaskan Malamutes, Keeshonds, ...


2

With that question you better to go to a vet. He will take skin scraping, and check it in laboratory. The treatment will depend on what your cat has, whether it's mange, mites, tinea, food allergy. And don't worry, all these problems are solved easily with correct medicines.


2

Hamster hair loss is usually a vicious cycle: some irritation causes itching, itching causes scratching, scratching causes more irritation, etc. Other usual suspects would be stress, which can lead to both hair loss and scratching, low food variety, allergy and cancer. While I wouldn't be alarmed, it is always a good idea to take him to a vet. I personally ...


2

The hair loss of a hamster is almost always caused by rubbing against a hard object or sharp object in its cage, but the type of bedding you may use could potentially cause the hamster to lose hair if it is allergic to its bedding. One other cause could be that the cage is to moist from the water bottle dripping.


1

Perfectly normal, unless the kitten's getting bald spots, then it may be a flea problem. Get the metal bristle pet shed brush for the kitten, it helps so much. If the kittens gums are pale, that's a sign of worms. So just keep a look out for those. Easy fix though. Over the counter medications work fine if you catch it in time. Is the kitten blooded by ...


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