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12

We have a White's tree frog and an American toad, and feed live crickets to both. We've had good success with this box, which is available at pet stores: The box comes with a very nice mechanism for transferring the crickets to your frog cage. In the picture, you can see the two black tubes sticking out. The tubes are capped on one end and removable. ...


6

You'll always want to add fish into a tank slowly. When you add fish in, there's going to be a bit of an ammonia spike as the bacteria in the tank processes the chemical imbalance. The trick is balancing out how many fish you can add that won't cause too much of a chemical imbalance that they'll be harmed by it. That's why I usually suggest adding the ...


6

Information specific to Indonesian floating frogs is somewhat thin on the ground. However, a common guideline for fish and other aquatic pets is "as much as they can eat in two minutes". The number of crickets they can eat will also depend on the size of the crickets. I'm generally in favour of offering a varied diet. Indonesian floating frogs tend to ...


4

If you'd just like the final numbers and are less concerned about the reasoning behind them, answer is as follows: EITHER get 2 African clawed frogs OR 6 neon tetras, 6 cherry barbs, 6 gold barbs, 3 guppies, and 0-1 snails. Detailed answer below: African clawed frogs are generally recommended to be kept in a species-only tank. (As in no fish, just frogs.) ...


4

I agree with Manuki and I'd also add a few other things: The amount of ammonia in the water will depend on how much the inhabitants are producing. If you're feeding very sparsely, they'll produce less ammonia. A snail and some smallish frogs should be relatively low impact. The more water you can put them in the better (for stability and for soiling). Make ...


4

Stocking is very subjective to the specific inhabitants as well as the setup and your aquarium experience. There's a general 1" of fish per gallon guideline for FW tanks, but that's also subjective and most experienced aquarists disagree with it. For your size fish it should be mostly appropriate. Since you're just starting out with it, I would get the tank ...


3

I have several (4) and I often see them sort of obliviously swimming into the wall or objects or each other. It does not appear to be with aggressive intent but they make quick snappy movements and don't necessarily account for bumping things. Pretty much any time they need air they shoot up almost as fast as they can and then back down again usually ...


3

I've never heard of anyone keeping them in a tank without a cover before, simply because it's better to be safe than sorry, however on my research journey I did find this interesting tidbit: The water level must be dropped 2.5-5.1cm (1-2") from the top for two reasons; one, to allow for proper gas exchange and respiration of the frogs, and two, to ...


3

It will not harm your frog. It just simply means your frog is a male. It is not know what these spots (which are actually glands) are used for though. Here's a picture!


3

Since the medicated water and the neighbor's water both might bring undesirable consequences, and we don't have another trusted aquarium to provide water, I will suggest that you can mitigate the effects of the new cycle by changing water very regularly, for example 50% every single day. (with dechlorinator) This way any explosion of ammonia will be managed ...


2

Being a frog, it can see only things that move. So if you feed it anything which does not move, it is as if it does not exist. In their natural environments, toads and frogs eat living (and moving) insects. Pretty much anything that moves and fits their mouths. Therefore, you have only a few alternatives: buy living insects to feed to your toad; grow your ...


2

It sounds like your frog is in estivation As you've not provided an image yet or any specific tank information, I'll give an answer with general information on how your tank should be set up: Pacman frogs should be kept between 25 - 31 °C (77 - 88 °F). If you have a UVB light it should only be on for 12 hours maximum. Ensure your tank is moist as they need ...


2

Manuki and Henders have both provided great advice. I was concerned I needed to act fast, so I made an executive decision before they had responded. However, I think the decision I made is reflected in their advice. I have a bottle of the Top Fin Bacteria Supplement. I put that in the vase to help break down the ammonia that was building up in their vase. ...


2

A toad has no teeth to chew on worms, so they are alive when swallowed. The toads stomach is not filled with water, but with acid. As soon as the acid dissolves the worms skin / shell, its body cannot keep life functions going. Since meal worms don't have an internal skeleton and are more like a fluid than tissue inside, they will simply flow appart and die. ...


1

In my experience, it sounds quite normal. I've kept African clawed frogs, and sometimes they go on a swimming frenzy where they seemed to "claw" (with their hands) at the aquarium glass. Mine also had a habit of eating whatever would fit in their mouths and I even saw one swimming into things to try to force whatever was in his mouth to fit (it was a dried ...


1

The first thing I would do is put the frog into a quarantine tank so that it doesn't affect your other frog or fish. My first thought was that it was possibly a reaction to an ammonia spike, sometimes called an ammonia burn it can be caused by something as simple as changing the filter, but if you've recently tested your water and it's fine then that might ...


1

American green tree frogs stay relatively small. I would say you could go with a relatively small tank. 5 gallon would work but a 10 gallon would be ideal more than likely. The standard 10 gallon tanks are around the specifications that you listed in your question. You'll know if the little guy is stressed out. These are what I sell at the pet shop I work at....


1

When you move a tank, and hold it only on the sides, there indeed will be a lot of pressure on the bottom and it could cause damage. Especially if the tank is pretty large (like yours seem to be) and not empty. Normally you should try to make a tank as empty as possible when moving it. Remove any big rocks or ornaments, and remove as much water as possible (...


1

I feel like I have to answer this, even if I am too late! Beware of the differences between Dwarf Frogs and African Clawed Frogs. The second wikipedia article there even says: African clawed frogs are frequently mislabeled as African dwarf frogs in pet stores. The astute pet owner will recognize the difference, however, because of the following ...


1

Try fancy guppies or balloon mollies. They are both suitable for 10-20 gallons and are top dwelling fish, community fish, so they'll add color and life to your tank with little interaction with your dwarf frog, and won't pick on him. I've learned they're hardier than most think. Plant recommendations would be Dwarf Anubias or Moss balls. Check out this list ...


1

I have two African dwarf frogs in my tank, and I don't really think that you have to keep a lid on. I do have a lid on mine, but I have never seen them try to jump out. Sorry, however I couldn't find the answer to how high they can jump. Overall, I don't think that them jumping out would really be a big problem since they like to hide or just stay at the ...


1

I don't have any experience with this particular species, but I do currently keep some other frogs. This article confirmed what I suspected about their diet; crickets are the best thing to feed them. Sprinkle some reptile vitamins on the crickets before you give them to the frog. If you've never used crickets as live food before, you might want to check ...


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