Hot answers tagged

10

No, Dehumidifiers do not kill fleas. The most effective way is to use a topical or oral chew flea product on all pets (excluding reptiles and birds) in the household for a minimum of 3 months. If you live in an apartment/condo building or a hot climate you should treat your pets 12 months of the year. Areas that get snow and stays cold in the winter months ...


9

We've never done that with our cats as they're indoors, but the risk of fleas being introduced into the house through other means is probably your basis for consideration. If there is some chance of wildlife making it in or other pets visiting (like a friend's dog), then you might consider it. However, if it's gone this long without the treatment, I would ...


9

Some breeds of fleas are more resistant to some treatments than others. It may be a case of needing to switch to a different flea treatment, which is something the vet can advise you on. Fleas on a long-haired cat are a PITA to get rid of, as I know from personal experience (thanks, ex-flatmate!!), partly because there is more fur for them to hide in and ...


8

Firstly, it's probably worth understanding how each of them works and the upsides to them... Oral Typically work by ingestion. In other words the parasite takes a bite, as it were, and poisons itself. No issue with substance transferring to you or a child, not all people react well to topical medications, including babies. Some options are more or less ...


7

Speaking from experience here: my husband and I purchased a house 18 months ago. Our 3 cats never go outside, but earlier this year we needed to flea treat the cats and the house. The previous owners had dogs who were inside and out, and the very mild winter plus us not realizing there could be an issue meant that over the course of a year the flea ...


7

If fleas have a way into your house (via a dog, for example, or if you spend a lot of time outdoors in woods), then your cats could still get fleas that way. If this is the case, I suggest you use a flea comb regularly to look for flea dirt. A flea comb has extremely fine teeth; comb the cat every day and use a white cloth or tissue to wipe off the ...


7

As well as James' suggestion for Diatomaceous earth, I'd recommend using a flea comb to get fleas off the kitten. It's a nasty job (I've done it for cats who were too old to safely use commercial treatments) but it does help. You sit yourself and the kitten on a plain light-colored cloth so you can easily see any fleas. Comb the kitten and use your ...


6

Diatomaceous Earth is generally safe. The concerns with DE are that it can cause skin and lung irritation if the animal (or human) experiences prolonged exposure (for example, if you dust your house in DE and don't clean it up, or leave it in the pet bed for a month). The lung irritation from DE is generally not persistant, but I would be sure to protect my ...


6

I found a stray puppy some months back at the gate to my home and she was covered with fleas and cuts. She kept biting herself and would also wimper in pain. You could see the fleas in her fur, they were huge. First, I got a small empty aerosol bottle with a spray nozzle and bought a small bag of flea powder (the generic stuff you can get at any store, ...


5

They absolutely can. There are two types of flea which are generally found on rabbits. The more common is the cat flea, known as Ctenocephalides felides. The other is called the rabbit flea or Spilopsylla cuniculi. It is less common for rabbits to be affected by Spilopsylla cuniculi... C. felides can survive on cats, dogs and rabbits. Therefore, if any of ...


5

It appears as though flea and tick treatment is effective on dogs with all hair types, despite the differences in oil production, as long as the product is applied correctly. From Bioactivation in Fleas: [Flea and Tick removal] products move through the oily coating of the dog or cat’s hair and skin in exactly the same way in long and short-haired breeds....


5

In the US, modern plumbing has a trap. A small amount of water stays in the trap to prevent sewer gases from entering the building. If a flea is washed down the drain but doesn't get pushed all of the way into the sewer, it will hang out in this water pool, and thus, will never get dried out to revive. Sometimes the traps of infrequently used drains will ...


4

Fleas are probably the most common carriers of tapeworm eggs. It's beneficial for the tapeworms because dogs and cats will pick at the fleas with their mouths, inevitably ingesting some (cats even more so as they also will catch some while grooming themselves). So then the ingested fleas that contain the tapeworm eggs are carried to the intestines, where ...


4

I have had 3-4 indoor cats. Two of them I've had for around 14 years. One of those, is/was a jailbreak artist who has managed to leave the house for her own adventures typically lasting 6-12 hours. I have NEVER ever had flea problems. The only time I used flea / parasite treatment was when we adopted the second cat (who we literally found on the street). ...


4

I searched extensively for a reliable reference on yeast as an effective flea treatment. I found multiple mentions of the treatment. Some mention it 'might' be an effect treatment. All mention studies that say there was not evidence to support the treatment, some casually mention studies supporting the treatment. I found no indicators that yeast might ...


4

You can buy flea drops from the pet store and apply them to the skin behind the neck. See, for example, http://www.wikihow.com/Apply-Advantage-to-Dogs. However, this does not protect the stray dog from more serious conditions, such as rabies. Rabies would also be a danger to other people and animals. Therefore, the best solution would be to take the dog ...


4

If you only used diatomaceous earth (DE) last week you can be certain that you still have fleas in your home and on your pets. As you also used Frontline and Paradyne on the dog and cats, you can be relatively sure fleas will not survive on them. In this case you are breaking the fleas life cycle, female fleas need to have a blood meal in order to breed. ...


4

Fleas are attracted to heat; that is how they sense potential animals to jump on and bite. One way to detect/remove fleas from an empty room, including fleas that haven't yet hatched, is to set up a lamp (heat source) just above a pan filled with soapy water. The fleas will jump toward the lamp and land in the water where they will drown. Examine the pan ...


4

There's likely very little you can do to prevent a cat from getting into a place it has its mind set on getting into. Cats are agile, athletic, and acrobatic. Making your fence unclimbable won't accomplish anything, and a jump into your yard from a high location (nearby tree, or roof) likely won't faze a cat. Considering that cats can walk between sharp, ...


4

It looks to me like you're already off to a pretty good start with the topical Broadline treatment and with fumigating your house. I'm not convinced the "pesticide-free all-in-one flea spray" you're using is really doing anything, though, but I haven't tried it myself. As motosubatsu notes, washing your cat with a flea shampoo might help. Since you say ...


4

Start your machine at the highest available temperature (usually 95 or 65°C). This should reliably kill all fleas and their eggs. I advice against washing with only 40°C, since the water pumped out already cooled inside the machine and continues to cool down in the hose. Adult cat fleas die in temperatures colder than 46.4°F (8°C), and hotter than 95°F (...


3

Fleas will be far less active once temperatures drop below 5 or 10 °C, but they can be still active and don't really hybernate (ticks as well). However, they won't procreate if temperatures are that low and they'll more or less be idle waiting for the temperatures to climb again. Due to this I'd consider snow or even grass below the snow pretty much "clean",...


3

This may not be the answer your looking for, but... And also I'm not an expert, it just might help... There is no proper use of the collar( and they have strict and clear limitations), other than the one put up by the producer(typically: change it often, keep away any tempering agent e.g. water, dirt, shampoo). The way a collar works is by emanating an odor ...


3

Dogs and cats have a wide variety of flea management options available, but most flea treatments for ferrets are off-label. In additional to vacuuming and treating the environment, you can try: Food-grade diatomaceous earth. Enzymatic products like Kleen Green, which are labeled as non-toxic. Serious flea problems generally require stronger measures, ...


3

We use DE around our kennel all the time. It does a great job of controlling all sorts of bugs including fleas and ticks. When a flea problem arises we dust the dogs with it (being careful to not let them breathe it in) and keep it on their bedding. We also put it around the perimeter of the kennel. It will kill just about any bug. The crystals are sharp ...


3

A bath with dawn dish soap is the safest and most effective method in my opinion. The lather from the soap drowns the fleas, and contains no medicines that can have side effects. In fact, I would say it's the most effective treatment aside from preventative medicines. As with normal baths, just make sure to be careful not to get water in your kitten's ears, ...


3

Your kitten is very sick. There are a variety of problems that can cause these symptoms, from a tick bite to a spinal injury, but we cannot diagnose these problems over the internet. The only way for your kitten to get help is to go see a veterinarian.


3

Dish soap, bar soap, liquid soap, shampoo (for humans) is a no-no for cat's (or dogs). Cats skin is a significantly different Ph than human skin and using these products can cause irritation, itching, allergies, etc. Additionally, when they groom themselves, they can ingest chemical traces that may cause other issues in the future. For good flea control, ...


3

Yes germicidal bleach will kill flea eggs on hard surfaces and in laundry, but the trick with hard surfaces is getting into the nooks and crannies where you can't see. If you have tested a small amount on the hard surfaces first, you may want to consider doing a soaking.. to let it sit and seep into cracks. When using it in laundry use co!Or safe bleach ...


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