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39

The most reasonable explanation is that it died and was eaten by the other fish / snails. Note that some snails are carnivorous. Many fish are cannibalistic if the opportunity arises. Some leftovers of the missing fish might be found inside the aquarium, if you look carefully. Or in the filter. Some fish have the idea to jump out of the water. With this ...


35

Fish excrete hormones in their waste. In a confined space like an aquarium, these hormones build up and act as growth inhibitors, this is basically an evolutionary mechanism, to prevent fish from dying if they end up in a water system that is cutoff from continuous fresh water. The larger the fish, the more space and continuously replenished clean water they ...


25

Goldfish do not make noise to get attention but they will come to the surface of the water when you walk up to the tank. Goldfish and other fish will learn that when you come it means food is on its way. Goldfish are bottom feeders so they will move pebbles and small rocks to find food. The tank you have is too small for keeping goldfish, please read this ...


22

It is actually not uncommon for fish to disappear, seemingly without a trace. It has happened to me a few times. Sometimes you eventually find out what happened, sometimes you don't. There are several things that could have happened to it. Each of these things has happened to my fish at some point in the past. It might be hiding. Some fish are really ...


22

Depending on the size and temperature limitations of the species, there are several ways approved by the American Veterinary Medical Association. One-step process of immersions (intentional overdose via immersion) in easily obtained (for hobbyist) solution includes: Eugenol (clove oil). Ethanol. Carbon dioxide saturated water, for most fish. It is ...


20

Assuming you're absolutely certain that the fish did not die from a disease or parasite (I'm not certain how you would ensure that, short of having absolutely nothing new introduced into the environment for an extended period of time prior to the death)... I would say it depends upon what died, and the other denizens of your aquarium. If you have a decent ...


20

From what I've seen, there's not a lot of settled science about the inner lives of fish. It's not really obvious whether they even experience emotional states like boredom in a way we would recognize. Most of the research in this field of animal behavior focuses on larger vertebrates from what I can tell. When we talk about a bored pet, what we're basically ...


18

As Precious Tijesunimi mentioned, it is wrong to flush a fish, live or dead (perhaps especially not live, as this is how many harmful species get introduced to environments they don't belong to... not to mention it is cruel). Especially don't place it into a "natural" ecosystem! In fact, both of these options may be illegal in many areas. Depending on ...


18

A lot of pet stores - particularly those dedicated to aquariums - will happily take unwanted fish off your hands. So if that ends up the case, and you can't put them in another tank, call around and see if any stores will take them. Often the fish just end up getting resold by the store. I've heard some stores may even give you store credit towards the ...


18

It is most important that a betta fish have the right environment. If the environment is right, it's easier to treat any illnesses the fish may develop. Your fish needs at least 5 gallons (19 L) (despite what a pet store employee recommends, you can always get a different tank). Additionally, the smaller the tank, the more frequently you need to perform ...


17

Fish do care if it´s day or night: they have a cicardian rhythm and many physiological events are related to the day / night time. Light could interfere with that. Source: this book, chapter 6. Even blind fish can have a cicardian rhythm Leaving the aquarium light accidentally lit for one night won´t instantly kill them but will cause some stress.


17

Ich Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Source: aquariacentral.com) Ich is an tiny ectoparasite that can harm fish if they succumb to it. If not cared for properly, it can kill fish. It's important to note that ich is always present, and there is nothing you can do to get rid of it. Fish are naturally immune to ich, and only succumb to it when their immune ...


17

Your goldfish has ammonia poisoning. First aid for this is to change 50% of the water at once. You need to change 20% of the water on day 2 and day 3, and from day 4 you need to change 10% water daily. Test the water for ammonia every day until the level is safe. Do not feed your fish until the ammonia level is safe, and after the ammonia level is safe ...


16

First, the turtles are eating the fish because fish are food, not friends. Turtles are omnivores and fish make up part of their natural diet. There's absolutely nothing you can do to stop it other than separating them from each other. You cannot train turtles to treat food as anything but food. You may get lucky, and have a turtle that's content with the ...


15

Well, you didn't say so, but I assume you have a thermometer inside your tank, don't you? Or did you measure the temperature using a portable, temporary one? Since your tank is inside your house, it's not directly at sunlight, perhaps some breeze was on it, etc. For the solutions, since it only happens few times a year, I'd go with ice cubes of pre-treated ...


15

Assuming you aren't driving and therefore can't place them in a bucket with an air source, the best bet is to ship them in breathable bags. The most widely-known breathable bags are Kordon Breathing Bags: Stocked sizes include: - 5.5" x 8" - 7.5" x 12" - 11.5" x 19" Breathing Bags allow the transfer of carbon dioxide and oxygen through the ...


15

This is a good example of overstocking a fish tank. Don't feel too bad about it, I don't know anyone who didn't overstock their tank the first time. It's just too tempting. Here's the problem though... Fish waste contains ammonia, which is toxic to fish. Which wouldn't be a problem for them in a lake or river, but we keep them in a glass box. Meaning, ...


14

Neons and black skirt tetras* are both easy-going fish, so you won't have much problem with them being aggressive to newcomers. As long as anything you add isn't highly predatory/aggressive and isn't too huge, they'll probably play nice. (Bear in mind that if one fish can fit another into its mouth, it probably will at some point.) One thing that I'm not ...


14

Oddly enough, there are some articles about it. This article, Reactions in individual fish to strobe light. Field and aquarium experiments performed on whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus), deals with strobe light and whitefish, as its title says. Their conclusion is that fish will swim away from the strobe light and don't bother if it comes from behind. Since ...


14

In your specific situation, you note that this was not your fish and that you were caring for the property of someone else. In this case, not knowing what the owner would want, and realizing the fish was dead, I would have taken a Ziplock or otherwise seal-able bag, put the dead fish in it, taped a written note to the bag noting what it contains, and placed ...


14

Betta fish, which is how your fish are more commonly known, are famously aggressive. Males in particular should never be kept with other males -- one will kill the other. Females can be kept together in larger groups with care, but pairs or mixed-sex groups won't work. Don't even worry about trying to find it a mate until you're really comfortable keeping ...


14

Most male bettas will fight with anything that even remotely resembles another male in finnage or coloration. Some will attack any fish indiscriminately, regardless of its appearance. It is inherently risky to house bettas with other fish. Some bettas are too aggressive to be kept with any species, and many community species will damage the finnage of a ...


14

Nearly any cover you buy or build will allow enough air to circulate. If you're concerned, you can just leave a bit more space between the water surface and the cover, but this really isn't a big deal in practice. And there are some good reasons to keep a tank covered: A cover reduces evaporation, which means you don't lose water as quickly. This can be ...


13

Like any other protein-based life form, dead fish give off toxic byproducts like cadaverine and putrescene, which can be toxic in high doses. I can imagine that it's not urgent that you remove the dead fish, but letting them fester and degrade away may have toxic effects on the other fish. I don't have a reference to back that up, though. This article talks ...


13

I'm assuming you're referencing the Siamese fighting fish (correct me if I'm wrong.) They tend to be very aggressive, as I'm sure you know, and it is very popular to keep two of them with a separator made of plexiglas or some other acrylic see-through material. I don't think they get "lonely", rather "bored". As far as breeding them goes, just be careful. ...


12

Tiger barb prefer a well-planted aquarium, that would imitate their original environment. Tetras, in general, also like some plants to hide them from the light. Since there are so many specimens of plants, with so many shapes, sizes, densities... I think the best way to "measure" how much plants you could have would have to take into account all ...


12

I have kept all kinds of tetras: cardinal tetras; rummy-nose tetras; balloon red eye tetras; penguin tetras with neons; black neons without any problem. Apart from the tetra species, you can keep harlequin rasboras, nerite snails and Amano shrimps as well.


12

So... What I would consider/do is: Tank capacity according to the fish you already have and the size of your current tank. Bear in mind that these are rules of thumb. The species you have and the species you intend to add. I don't know what you have and what you'd like to get, but before doing so, do check. Feed the fish in your current tank before adding ...


12

Going by your pictures, no, you can't combine these fish. Please don't take this the wrong way: these tanks are much too small for the animals in them, and have inadequate filtration. Giant gouramis get huge, bigger than some cats and dogs -- you're looking at a fish that needs several hundred gallons of water. The other tank already has too many huge, ...


12

These actually sound like snail eggs to me. Your tetras are egg scatterers, and lay tiny eggs hidden in rocks or thick plants growth. You can see what their eggs look like in this video -- very tiny, and not protected in a gelatinous mass like the ones you've found. (Note that your tetras are an albino or leucistic strain of the ones in the video, but the ...


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