Hot answers tagged

2

People consider them obsolete. Under gravel filtration is an old technology, and seems to be going out of favor for newer types of filters, to the point where under gravel filtration has become a point of controversy among people who keep aquariums, with many arguing that they should no longer be used at all. The arguments against them seem to boil down to: ...


2

I have never had an external filter like this and I have never experienced such a buildup in the filter - I have always been using internal, fully submerged filters - but based on your photo and description of the material being slimy I would say it is a bacterial biofilm that is attached to the precipitated limescale underneath. I do not think it is a ...


1

It is fecal material and decomposing plant material. That is why replacement filter elements are available. I use polyester fiberfill padding sold to make quilts; I cut it in rectangles to fit my filters and replace it as needed. I also use the garden hose to flush permanent type filters. The mud material also collects in certain locations in my pond; I ...


1

You need to find a way to get the surface water moving. You can use an aquarium airpump and an airstone or simply use a fan to blow air over the surface of the water. If you can limit the number of animals in your tank you will not need a dedicated filter in your tank; the surfaces on the plants and your tank will provide the bacteria a place to live and as ...


1

When things started to go wrong you did a few things right, like changing water and adding salt. Keep on changing water every two days about 20-25% until you get the ammonia down, you need to stop feeding your fish until you get the ammonia and nitrite under control. Keep on adding aquarium salt and water conditioner to the water, use a salt concentration of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible