Hot answers tagged

11

Uncommon, but not rare. Chase-and-pounce is, of course, a widespread cat game; "retrieving" is the more complicated behavior. Some cats figure out on their own that humans can be trained to throw a toy repeatedly if it's brought to them. One of mine does this. (Though it only works around a corner, since if she can see me she seems to get distracted and ...


5

Every dog has their own personality and own values. As you correctly suspected, your dog values his possession of the ball more than treats. One trick you can try is trading one object with another of the same value - meaning trading one ball for another. You should only offer him the second ball if he's close enough to you that you don't have to walk far to ...


4

You need to find something worth more than the ball in your dogs eyes and offer it as reward for giving up the ball. This can be difficult, as you've already mentioned that treats don't work, and every dog is going to be different on their preferences. You'll need to play around with other high value objects. If nothing ends up comparing to the ball, you ...


3

This is a fairly common problem. I would make a game out of fetching the ball. You basically want the dog to be in drive, have her fetch, take the ball away and get her to fetch again. You can do this by: Build drive by getting her excited about the ball. My guess is that this should not be hard since she likes the ball. It is important that she is in ...


3

I have had two cats in my life that "fetch" the first I learned by accident. I wadded up a piece of paper and threw it away and she brought it back to me. Her reward was a belly rub. She loved them. My current female cat starting playing fetch with me a few months ago. She brought the toy to me. I thanked her, threw it and brought it back (several times lol)...


2

I think I can give you some help here. You need to teach her how to fetch from the ground up. I had a dog growing up who would do this, minus the barking. She might bring it to within 12' of me when she fetched it, but then she'd either run off with it or not even go fetch it. I now have a Jack Russell who will fetch till she passes out. It's something she ...


2

6-inch Fetch Have you tried just working on having her put things in your hand separately from fetching? For example, start in a really small room or area and ask her to sit / down / etc. and then put the ball (or anything else) between you and her and release her. When she gets the ball and puts it near your hand, you and reward with treats / tug / etc. ...


2

I see 2 possibilities here, one more likely. First, make sure he isn't going blind. Simply engage him in play, preferably in a poorly lit room, and move your hand holding a toy or a treat far to the left and right. If he follows your hand with his head, he can see you well, but if he stays focused on your body and ignores your hand, he might have problems ...


1

Enforcing naptime worked! He was already napping on his own when I let him out, but I guess he was still over-exerting himself by getting my attention all day. I put him in bed in the bedroom for a few hours and he came out ready to fetch! In fact, he wants me to play fetch right now :)


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible