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25

This is a very common question on this SE and it makes perfect sense. The cat for some reason is traumatised by your action. You might have stepped on his tail, or she might just be upset because you defended the dog. It doesn't necessarily mean you did something bad, it is just impossible to relay the reasons behind our actions to the cats. The good thing ...


23

You need to break the existing conditioning your cat has at the moment. The classic approach would be to close the door and immediately open it again. Then slowly increase the time that the cat will accept the closed door. Make sure you always open the door before he starts to fuss and complain and by all means before he freaks out - or you’ll likely start ...


20

Our cat was not thrilled to go into the box either (it was less severe than you, though). As soon as she felt that something was wrong she would run for her life under the bed and good luck getting her out of there. We did two things: we broke the routine of closing her somewhere and sneaking in with the box we put the box right in the middle of the living ...


19

My girlfriend is a veterinary nurse and this is a situation she has seen and we've discussed it on several occasions. All animals are always on the lookout for danger. Even the most domesticated pets that led a house bound life since birth will have that natural behavior. When an event startles them, like dropping a plate on the ground in the kitchen, they ...


12

I don't know enough about cats to give an answer to how and if the relationship between the cat and husband can be repaired. But one thing got me to react: Every time he gives her a bath now her head swells. Something is medically wrong with the cat. Take her to a vet and get her checked out.


10

Please don't get offended, but reading your description I think that your husband's actions and attitude towards the cat are bordering animal abuse and reek of aggressive frustration. I think the best you could do is find new home for the cat, considering her best emotional comfort. For the greater good, I think your husband shouldn't be allowed in to come ...


8

Ana, I'm going to make a bold statement, but cats do not have "night terrors". If you've seen her going into a spasm, shaking uncontrollably and peeing and/or pooing herself, then your cat is almost certainly having epileptic seizures. It's not just people who have those. I have helped to care for a cat who suffered a head injury which lead to some degree ...


7

There is plenty of evidence that animals are not only intelligent, they also have emotions relating to our own. Your cat is terrified of your husband, who (I need to say) almost killed her. Of course she wants nothing whatsoever to do with him. It's not like an apology would help. But your husband's expectations of the cat are completely lacking in empathy. ...


6

Even if your cat is infected with FIP, the neutering is safe to do. I have had this done to a feral cat I had a couple of years ago (actually it was done at the same time as a tooth was extracted as a result of FIP). I cannot answer how safe it is to spay a female cat that has FIP, but I do not think the risk is significantly elevated in female cats. Cats ...


6

How can I recover my cat and boyfriends relationship You can't, only the boyfriend and the cat can work this out. If your boyfriend wants to fix it he should read this related post How can I fix my relationship with my 7 month old cat after I've constantly abused her the past month?


6

One possible explanation of the attack is that something scared your cat and, since you note that the cats “don’t like the dog”, your cat probably assumed the dog was to blame and attacked him in “self-defense”. Not fully trusting you afterward is likely because you undoubtedly have a bit of the dog’s scent on you. The best thing you can do to help her calm ...


4

My best guess is that your cat is actually playing. Your cat is pretty young, and so it could have extra wild energy. Sometimes when cats get really hyper, they will run about the house wildly, really making a ruckus. Suddenly diving into hiding places can also be a part of play as well. Cats also tend to get more active or even hyper around mealtimes, which ...


4

I feed my cats twice a day in their transportation crates. If I need to take them to the vet, I just close the door as they are eating. I would suggest getting a new crate (no bad associations), and start making it the most wonderful place ever. Put tasty food treats in there. Make it warm and cozy. Anything you can do to increase the value of the crate. ...


4

This may be counter intuitive, but the best thing you can do is ignore the noise. What usually happens is something like this: The dog hears a noise that she doesn't know how to deal with. She looks at you for guidance. Is this dangerous? You see her looking at you and talk to her to calm her down. She doesn't understand a single word of what you say, but ...


3

he got upset and lashed out when we tried to get hands on him to get him the carrier This a mistake that so many people make even with well-balanced cats. They make the carrier into "the scary box that you get manhandled into to go to unpleasant experiences". Because you are obviously very caring and are willing to spend time rehabilitating this ...


3

Firstly, I have to emphasise how noble it is for you to take home such a cat. There are a few questions on this site on how someone might regain the trust of a cat after they abuse the cat. Your situation is not very different. The cat is probably abused, either by other cats or by people and you need to regain his trust to humanity. In my opinion, your wife,...


3

When you aren't going to the vet, and you want to sleep, put the box just inside the bedroom door when it's closed. When you open the door he will see the box and decide to go elsewhere. Okay, you'll have to get up a few times earlier than you want but you won't have to do this many times - cats learn quickly.. You may have to adjust this a little according ...


3

Please refrain from hitting your cat ever again. Not only is it abusive, but also completely counterproductive in the context of behavioral training because a cat would not even realize the causal relationship - I mean a cat would not associate being hit with a concept of punishment for having done something wrong, the only effect of that would be what you ...


3

Hiding in the shadows is a normal thing cats do - your other cat may do it significantly less because he is bigger, because he is more relaxed, less noticeably compared to the other one, or maybe because he doesn't have as much to fear as your other cat (who seems to, reasonably, be afraid of the man who blocks off all their hiding places and one time ...


3

You mentioned the cat's eyes were large, but do you know whether it's pupils were dilated? Cats' eyes dilate when they're about to pounce, or when they're scared. If you think back to the situation, perhaps you can remember the cat's body language. Did it seem jumpy? Or did it seem aggressive? I think a fear reaction is the more likely explanation, since ...


3

Cats have mood swings. This might be because we don't know enough about cats' personality or because the cats cannot convey us what they want. However, to the best of our knowledge, cats have mood swings. Cats have very strong routines as well. Cats love to eat, cuddle, play and sleep at the same hours of each day. Therefore, noticing daily patterns might be ...


3

Give your cat time and space. Remember that humans are about ten or more times the weight of an eight pound cat! That's got to be a bit scary. Some ideas: Slow blinks while extending your head a bit, leading with your nose. It's "I like and trust you" in Cat. Don't stare, that can be aggressive. If watching them and they look at you, do the ...


3

Introducing cats takes a lot of time and patience. Six weeks might feel like a long time has passed with no progress, because it’s very stressful for the humans to work through this. But I think, ultimately, your cats just need more time. It sounds like you’re doing everything right. It doesn’t sound like any extreme fighting has broken out, and that’s ...


3

What you want to do is slowly acclimate them to your presence, start putting out food in a specific place and a specific time, if you haven't already been doing that, and choose a place somewhat nearby but not too close to that spot and sit there when you feed then, slowly move these places closer together until they are comfortable with you being next to ...


3

Your cat is scared because her instincts interpreted the loud noise as a threat in her territory, but being unable to identify what that threat was, she is also unable to determine that it is now gone. The fact you were holding her when the threat appeared may have had her associate it with you, which is unfortunate, but hopefully it returning when you weren’...


2

I know this is an old post but we figured out what happened. Due to the way she runs and “cuts” when making sharp turns, she blew out her ACL. We didn’t find out until she started limping afterwards and took her to the vet. After surgery and everything she still likes to play even today but not this game anymore. Now it’s a simple jog out there and catch the ...


2

My family barely ever has people over, so folks in the house who aren't family members is uncommon. Therefore, when we do have someone over, our normally confident and super tame kitties start looking freaked out and disappear. Not quite as bad as you're describing, but I understand a bit of where you're coming from, anyway. I would guess that like mine, ...


2

What you might try is to get a cat tree so your cats have an elevated place to hide and rest. You can make a place on top of some furniture or put up some shelves where the cats can observe the area. This will have to be in a place where you and the guests do not have to walk past, so not in a hallway, kitchen, or doorway. The trick is to make your cats ...


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