24

There are several legal issues with making wildlife into a pet, these laws vary by location and any response on that topic would be out of scope for this site. It happens that Saturday; I met a woman whose children found a baby cotton tail rabbit and kept it in captivity for several years (I believe she said 13). It was particularly interesting to note ...


15

Bonobos are NOT pets! And please, for you and the bonobo, do not try to keep one as pet. There are at least four reasons for this: Bonobos are not safe. The circumstances of bonobo capture and sale. Bonobo care. Legality. 1. Bonobos are not safe to be around for humans. This story on BBC debunks a few of the myths around bonobos; they do bite and are not ...


14

No, koalas are not good pets. Koalas can be aggressive. They have very long, sharp, and strong claws for climbing trees, and can bite. Koalas can do enough damage to send you to the hospital. (Warning for graphic images of koala inflicted injury. I'm not joking, it's pretty gruesome.) http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2862089/Looks-deceiving-South-...


13

The Australian Koala Foundation calls themselves "the principal non-profit, non-government organisation dedicated to the conservation and effective management of the wild koala and its habitat". They state: No, it is not permitted anywhere in the world. It is illegal to have a Koala as a pet anywhere, even in Australia. The only people who are ...


12

Just want to add that certain breeds of rabbit you find in the wild could be either pest species, endangered (example) or be a limited link in a food chain. Wild animals are best left in the wild, but in situations where wild animals cannot look after themselves and are not a pest species there are organisations with people who have experience in ...


9

No, snakes don't do any kind of measuring their prey before attacking like that. Typically they can see whether they can eat what they see. Similarly to how you don't have to bring out a tape measure to check whether something is bitesize. It's actually not unheard of that snakes try to eat something that's too big for them to swallow, or to mistake an ...


8

Probably not Good pet might not be the word for it. While very smart, crows need a lot of space, probably more then you can provide. And smart means they need mental stimulation. Think flying border collie. As for fit as a pet, there are quite a number of stories around of people who made it work. Most of them have the crow outdoors with a good relation to ...


8

Adopting a pet just prior to a move is probably not the best choice. The top two reasons for pets to be surrendered to a shelter are Moving and Landlord not allowing pets. Imagine you and your pet have just created a strong bond and now must be separated. Many (most?) colleges do not allow pets on campus, of those that do, there are restrictions. There ...


6

I did some research comparing the two different kinds of snakes. My research is showed below. Everything highlighted is cited and everything not cited is from my own experience and handling snakes myself. Adult corn snakes need a cage at least the size of a 20 gallon (76 liters) long aquarium, but bigger is even better. Snakes are not social animals, so ...


6

I'm inclined to say that dogs and sugar gliders are not compatible together, because there are enough cases where even well behaved dogs have killed sugar gliders. Even if it's accidental, I don't think the risk is worth it. The simple fact of the matter is that sugar gliders are tiny compared to even small dogs; and are so delicate that even though the dog ...


5

If you were to get a crow it would need to be from a breeder that offers crows legal to America. "...the only way that you can legally and ethically acquire a pet raven or crow is by picking a species that is not native to the U.S. and does not migrate to any portion of the U.S." Here's a link to this source. Crows can be extremely expensive to own and ...


4

I've found that with a properly set up terrarium, the substrate shouldn't come into contact with the water, so the only decomposing matter in the water should be the crab's molted shells. Since my terrarium is 30 gallons, and it's only used for molting, I've elected to change the water about once a month. I also put a pinch of aquarium salt into the water ...


4

Unfortunately, there is no way to properly keep a slow loris as a pet. This is for several reasons: as nocturnal animals with huge eyes, the bright lights of human houses cause them pain. As animals frequently on the move, being trapped in a tiny cage is unhealthy. Even the tickling behavior you mention is not so cute--a slow loris raises its arms when it ...


4

Yes, all cats have retractable claws, though a Cheetah's claws are only semi-retractable. The claws on the front legs of a cat are fully retractable as they need to be sharp for holding onto prey, for climbing, or as a weapon when fighting. The claws on a cat's hind legs cannot be retracted fully, but it is less important for a cat to have sharp claws there....


3

It sounds like you know that this is against the laws of Ohio or Pennsylvania or both. If it is, I would expect the animal to be confiscated and you may be charged with a criminal offense. If you are unsure of the laws, you should investigate them before hand. I would also urge you to consider the welfare of the animal. How likely is this wild animal to ...


3

We have a 4+ year old eastern cotton tail living with us. He came into our home at about 3 weeks old. I found him on the front lawn, looked like a cat had gotten at him. I brought him in, weighed him and guessed at age from that. I was going to release him at dusk, but there were 3 cats waiting where I had found him. Next day, the neighbours' dog was loose ...


3

Most wild animals can never really be "tamed", which is one reason they aren't kept as pets and one reason keeping them often requires a special license showing that you have the necessary training. Also note that even animals which have become used to living with people can take a long time to decide a particular person is trustworthy. I've known cats who ...


3

I don't own one but have known several people with them and had a close friend work at a primate rescue sanctuary which I was able to visit on several occasions. Primates make horrible pets. There's really no other way to put it. They are highly social animals that are extremely intelligent, extremely active, and being outside of a natural group, you the ...


3

It's certainly possible to have almost any animal as a pet. It varies from situation to situation as to how hard it is to make it happen. First, it depends on the area you live in and the local laws. There are some places that ban you even having a Pitbull, so the chances of them banning you from having a giraffe are pretty good. You'll have to contact your ...


3

There is no such thing as a "starter snake" - they all have different requirements and needs. It 100% depends what you want, and what you like the look of. If you like pythons and heavy bodied constrictors, it would be foolish to get a Corn Snake, because people say they are good for 'beginners'. There are many snakes in rescues due to this - people are ...


3

You should not get a Bonobo as a pet, they are aggressive and dangerous, and like with any smart animal, will use toddler style manipulation to get what they want. But I understand where you are coming from and thus recommend safer pets that hopefully meet your desire. If you want something ape like look no further than the (make sure it's legal in your ...


3

Look at Opisthoma of the scorpion. See the ventral (meaning belly side) and the dorsal (meaning upper side or back side). On both sides there is a series of carapace, meaning hard shell. The one on the ventral side is called sternite and the one on the dorsal side is called tergite. There are about 7 carapace joined one after another. They are joined by a ...


3

In general, don't feed your cat fruit. Cats are designed to be extremely carnivorous animals. Even more so than many other animals we think of as carnivorous such as dogs. So even if the particular fruit isn't toxic to them, they can't digest it very well, probably won't get much nutrition from it, and have a decent chance of getting diarrhea or vomiting ...


2

To be blunt, these creatures can have Jekyll and Hyde personalities and can be very vindictive and decisive. I would not get one if you have children or live alone. They can be quite territorial protective and jealous, a combination that is worrisome to say the least. They have been known to turn on there owners/human family and other family pets. There are ...


2

Bears can not be domesticated. They can be TAMED, but that means continuing to deal with them as wild and dangerous animals. Specialized training and licensing are absolutely required, plus living far enough from other people and maintaining enough control and site security to not be a danger to anyone but yourself. Unless you're going to make this your ...


2

The first few moths were the MOST important. Even one that was bottle raised but rehomed after 6 months has trouble. Start only feeding her from your hand though you could leave some food for over night or other long periods due to their high metabolism but make it what she likes least when you have to leave something out. You may need to wear heavy duty ...


2

What happens when the authorities pull up? There is no definitive answer as each state has its own laws and methods. Many states require permits for different classifications of exotic pets, and those rules may change on a periodic basis. It really depends on the pet and the laws regarding that pet. Some animals get locked up, some get euthanized, some ...


2

My husband destroyed a lone infant cottontail nest. I have been feeding her kitten formula and she is now 138 grams and about one month of age. I have been supplementing her formula with parsley, carrot top greens, grass, and spinach. She will sometimes eat carrots and apples. I had to give her probiotics I bought with a kitten rescue kit when she developed ...


2

It's not a good idea to take a wild animal into your house accept in very rare situations. Baby cottontail rabbits are very hard to keep alive without their mother for a number of reasons. First, they have poor immune systems and the little immunity they do have comes from the mother's milk. Without that they often die. Also-you can not buy rabbit formula at ...


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