20

This would be the Flehmen response: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flehmen_response Many animals will do this to move air over a specialized scent gland which is used to identify pheromones for reproductive and communication purposes. Our cats will do it for anything they think smells interesting, usually before they go to investigate more closely.


7

There are a number of reasons why cats can develop chronic nasal sound. Sometimes but not always there is an increase in sneezing that accompanies this sound. It can be a result of chronic viral or bacterial infection leading to rhinitis and/or sinusitis, fungal infection, nasopharyngeal polyps, nasal mass or tumor, and tooth root infection or abscess to ...


7

One of my animals had severe nosebleeds and I did the following: Keep the pet as calm as possible. In any animal, including humans, nosebleeding can be somewhat controlled by blood pressure and hormones produced by the body. Place ice on the nose and keep the room cool. Heat can cause vasodilation, which allows more blood to flow; if the cat gets excited ...


6

Cats naturally have thinner fur in that area, and if you look at the head at just the right angle, it can look almost bald like the photo. On some cats (especially those with darker fur, because of the contrast with the paler skin underneath) it's more noticeable than others. If you look at the cat from another angle, the fur usually looks fairly normal. If ...


6

It does sound normal to me. Many cats start to produce more saliva when being pet. The reason for this is not fully known, but it might be a response that has its origin in the brain of your cat, in the cat's pleasure center. It is the same response type as when the cat sees food and starts eating. https://www.animalwised.com/why-does-my-cat-drool-when-...


5

I second the recommendation to take your cat back to the vet for further evaluation. If there is discharge from both nostrils then it is more likely an upper respiratory infection (viral or bacterial) or allergic problem. If there is discharge just consistently from one nostril then it is very likely there is a problem starting in just that half of the nose. ...


4

While not an especially scientific test I often cook using generous amounts of star anise and have never noticed our dog taking any particular notice of it. Since reading your question on one occasion I left a small amount of warm broth with quite a large amount of star anise and on other occasion left a small bowl with a whole star anise steeping in warm ...


4

It doesn't look too bad so you don't need to do anything, but keep an eye on it, and if it starts to swell or is getting red, a visit to the vet might be needed. Cats do heal quite fast as long as there is no infection and from your picture it looks like it's starting to heal just fine. You might want to wash the wound with clean water, but this is usually ...


3

You will have to take your cat to the vet for this, get some x-rays of the sinuses and lungs. Your vet might take a sample of the discharge to see if this is a bacterial or viral infection. Nasal discharge can be caused by a number of things like a foreign object stuck in the nose of your cat, allergies might cause this, bacterial or viral infection is ...


3

It doesn't look like an emergency given a lack of behavioral differences but you should still contact your vet. Double check that it isn't a stain; you can dab gently with a moist cotton ball to see if the cotton ball picks up any color. If so, you'll want to clean the fur. Otherwise, given the hair looks shorter than before, it may be from physical trauma;...


3

I am NOT a veterinarian, so take my advice with a spoonful of salt. What I would do in this situation is try to shave the area (electric hair/beard cutters work fairly well in my experience, just be careful about angling it because a cats skin is thinner than a humans). I would then clean it using clean water, unless the area looks like it might be ...


3

No, dogs are not more or less sensitive to sound than humans (dogs in general do hear about the same sound frequency range as we do), but their hearing is better so this is not about the sound level, it is more about the type of sound. It is the rumbling sound made when you are driving on the motorway that can have a calming effect on your dog, it does have ...


3

Floppy ears tend to catch water, which results in more infections. Our vet taught us to dry out our dog's ears with gauze, and there's a few commercial options for regularish ear cleaning. Floppy ears are adorable, but a little more work and its worth bringing the dog to the vet for a proper examination and basic cleaning if you suspect infection


3

Mites usually don't stay more than a week or two. They bite the skin to suck blood and other fluids, but this causes the skin to scab. Since mites cannot bite through the scab, they don't get enough food anymore and either starve or leave their host to find a new one. This means that ear mites are contagious! Additionally, cats often become extremely ...


3

The phenomenon of hair loss in that area is called facial alopecia, and it's a normal pattern of hair loss when cats age. There are also scent glands around the face area, which cats enjoy rubbing on things, which may contribute even more to the hair loss in that area. I should note though that sometimes hair loss in that area can also be related to some ...


3

Not sure if the breed of the cat makes a difference when it comes to water in ears, but I could be wrong. I’ve heard many times the same thing your sister told you. I think they must have a hard time getting water out of their inner ear canals which could lead to infections and illness. We just have always typically avoided getting water in our cats ears ...


2

Dogs with hanging ears have a tendency to get ear infections because the hanging ears hinder aeration and keep the inside of the ear a warm and moist breeding ground for bacteria and fungi. Certain breeds (especially pure breeds) are even more at risk because the limited gene pool weakened their immune system. My own dogs suffers ear infections each and ...


2

If they are small (roughly 1mm in diamater), are flat and they don't hurt your cat (he doesn't recoil or otherwise seem to be in pain if you touch them) and your cat is not actively scratching them due to itchiness, your cat probably has lentigo simplex, AKA "cat freckles". They are 99% harmless and more will appear as the cat ages. However, if your ...


2

As Trond mentioned, this is completely normal. Some cats produce saliva when really enjoying themselves, causing drooling. Others will release more liquid from their nasal cavities and eyes that their nose will drip. I've had one cat who drooled, and I now have one whose nose drips. As long as this doesn't cause any problems for the cat, such as sneezing ...


2

As people have mentioned in the comments it does sound like an ear infection and would warrant a vet visit. Signs of an ear infection: Head shaking Head tilt Excessive scratching Hair loss or scabbing around the ears (from scratching) Foul odor Discharge from the ear Causes Allergies Frequent swimming without drying the ears Inadequate ear cleaning (...


2

This answer is part of Pet's Spring Cleaning Campaign. This question is old, but this answer will still help people with the same problem. It depends on your dog. For example, one (or both) ears drooping is very common in strays as described by hospitalveterinariglories.com: There are different conditions that can cause a dog to have one ear up and the ...


2

I think this is only a little bruise in the skin, it is most likely a result of your cat running into something during play. It is not uncommon for this type of bruises to get darker during the first few days in the same way as bruises in people can do. It does not look bad for now, but if it does not get better in a week you should take him to your vet. The ...


2

Most likely your cat has run into a window or similar object and gotten a bruise on the nose. The cause might be trying to attack its own reflection; cats are often very territorial, so when they see another cat they will try to chase it away even if it is their own reflection. It does not look serious to me, but a vet will have to take a look at it.


2

As far as I know dogs cannot physically close their nostrils, among mammals only the aquatic ones possess such mechanisms. But completely sealed nostrils are not actually that necessary because water entering just the nose itself is not that dangerous - it's the deeper parts of the respiratory system that must be protected - and such protection mechanisms ...


1

It looks like he may have scratched it with his nail. My dog had dark scabs all over his body similar to this color, but since the ones on your cat is not raised, I doubt it is the same condition. My dog's were bug bites.


1

I had a cat who had a deformity in his soft palate. The veterinarian did the exam under anesthesia, and this cat was exceptionally calm and allowed all sorts of poking and prodding without complaint. As an example for how calm and compliant this cat was, I once had him on his back to clip his claws and accidentally cut the quick. He stayed on the floor on ...


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