11

This is a medical emergency! A vet must make an x-ray of the stomach as soon as possible to verify whether or not the dog actually swallowed the battery. If he did indeed, the battery must be removed as soon as possible by a means the vet chooses. If the battery is intact, vomitting might be the easiest solution, but if the battery is punctured, it may cause ...


9

NEVER GIVE YOUR CAT MILK. Cats and all other adult mammals are unable to digest lactose, it makes them and many of us ill. The negative effect of giving milk is most likely stronger than the positive effect of glucosamine and the mineral supplement. As Elmy say in her answer, if the vomit is dark it might be internal bleeding so you will need to take your ...


8

Short answer: No. Cats do throw up from time to time, and it is normal. Keep an eye out for: more throwing up general sluggishness less appetite lack of defecation Generally just keep an eye out for more things that point to your cat being sick. If it is just this one throwing up, and he does not do it several times a day, you do not need to go to the vet. ...


8

First of all, I would pack some of the vomit up and send it to a vet for analysis. Speak to your vet to arrange a swift and efficient handover. To do this, clean an empty, airtight food container like a small glass jar or Tupperware container. If the container doesn't melt at boiling temperature, rinse it with boiling water to sterilize it (don't forget the ...


7

Food sensitivity is worth ruling out; I found out the expensive way with my cat (also a picky eater who lived on tuna food and was fed white fish daily as a youngster). After 11 years eating Felix tuna "chunks in jelly" (and Hill's t/d bites), having rejected other brands and other Felix types and flavours, he started, well, blowing chunks - once a ...


5

In general, eating yeast or unbaked yeast dough is considered an emergency for dogs. See the Pet Poison Helpline for more information. The reason for that is that usually a dog that gets access to some bread dough will gobble down a large amount of it (as much as is available or fits into their stomach). The big yeast ball in the stomach does continue to ...


3

Yes, but it's complicated. The glycemic index of dog foods depends on various variables, like which carbohydrates are contained in it and how much fiber and which type(s) of fiber the food contains. This study compared the glycemic indices of different dog foods with starches from different sources: The GI [glycemic index] (±SE) [standard error] of the ...


3

This is normal; you probably feed flake food and this does often have multiple colors. This is a trick the producer uses to make you buy it - however, it is not different content in the flake food - it is the same content in the food, only the coloring differs. The coloring is useless for the fish and is not absorbed by the fish, so it passes into the poop. ...


2

A toad has no teeth to chew on worms, so they are alive when swallowed. The toads stomach is not filled with water, but with acid. As soon as the acid dissolves the worms skin / shell, its body cannot keep life functions going. Since meal worms don't have an internal skeleton and are more like a fluid than tissue inside, they will simply flow appart and die. ...


2

It could be an indication of a fever, or it could be a sign of some other medical problem, such as an ear infection. It is probably a good idea to get your dog checked out by a vet.


2

If he never threw up in his 2 years of life, you're probably not providing him with grass to chew. Although this is not essential for his health and wellbeing, it's still recommended to offer a cat fresh grass for the health benefits and to prevent the cat eating plants that might be toxic. When cats lick their fur they inevitably swallow hairs, which are ...


1

As Stephie said, I wouldn't worry too much about this, since you're coming to the wrong conclusions here (at least to my knowledge). A few years back, one of our Huskies (~20kg back then) snagged a significantly larger piece of dough and nothing happened. Dogs' stomach acid is significantly more aggressive than the human equivalent. So while the yeast would ...


1

You statement "other than a slight thickening of the stomach lining" sounds like my cat although in her case I was told intestines rather than stomach. She has vomited every couple days for most of her life on every food I've tried, even canned. She started losing weight because it got so bad a few months ago and the vet prescribed oral steroids to put on ...


1

Mucous and blood in the stool can happen for a number of reasons, if it's routine for her to eat an assortment of things from outside then it's possible she got into something that irritated her bowels. Bland diet (hamburger + rice) for the next 24 hours, if no improvement it warrants a vet visit to rule out some causes (parasites, bacterial overgrowth, ...


1

It reads like your lil' furball has E.P.I. - exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. It is necessary to monitor your cat's progress on a weekly basis after initiating treatment. If he is wasting away and your vet has no further treatment options you can always get another veterinarian to diagnose your cat, but, if you haven't already, you might also want to ...


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