8

I have not tried this, but it is what I would try first. Get your supplies set up on the kitchen table, have your insulin drawn and ready. Have your cats favorite finger food treat on the table. Call the cat to your lap, pet the cat until you are both calm. Lightly grab the area you are going to tent up for giving the shot. Do this a couple to a few ...


7

Unfortunately, there does not appear to be a strong consensus among vets on this topic; however, based on my research (largely including information about humans with type 1 diabetes), it seems the answer is: Insulin injection site has an impact on the effectiveness, but it is far more important to pick a site and be consistent The main reason that the ...


6

Your question does a great job of addressing many key points about giving insulin to your dog. Nothing in the following answer is intended to replace direction by your veterinarian. These are just considerations not addressed in your question. One of the first things that comes to mind, is your comfort level. Consider if you are transmitting your anxiety ...


6

Your cat is showing symptoms that are signs of untreated diabetes in humans at least (weight loss, increased urination, fatigue), and untreated diabetics say the condition is quite uncomfortable. Untreated diabetes can lead to pretty awful complications in humans as well, such as blindness and susceptibility to infection. I'm guessing the same applies to ...


5

From a study at the University of Queensland Over representation of Burmese cats with diabetes mellitus. Rand, et al: Burmese cats were significantly over represented among cats with diabetes mellitus. Irrespective of breed, the risk of diabetes in the study population increased with age. So, there's definitely evidence of it.


5

I suspect that the recommendation to inject in the leg was made out of an abundance of caution to avoid injection site sarcoma (ISS), while the recommendation to inject in the scruff was made from a combination of factors: It's the easiest site for an owner to give an injection There's no proof that insulin can cause ISS Some vets still aren't aware of ISS ...


5

Short answer: Yes this is urgent. Long answer: Diabetes in any animal is no joke and is definitely a top priority to diagnose. The main reason is that blood sugar can fluctuate fast. Low blood sugar can put your cat into an unexpected coma and even result in death if left untreated. High blood sugar can cause nerve damage. These are the extremes of ...


4

There are 2 categories of insulin: fast-acting and slow-acting. Fast-acting insulin is mostly prescribed for humans with a bad case of diabetes and as emergency medication. ProZinc is a slow-acting insulin specifically developed for cats. It acts over a time of 10 - 14 hours (according to the manufacturer). That means, as long as your cat eats anything at ...


4

I have spoken to my vet via the nurse and I was advised that with him being newly diagnosed, it's okay to leave some kibble in a bowl because if his blood sugar drops before I get home he would feel hungry and eat it. They said they would rather his blood sugar be up a little over him having hypoglycemia. Tonight when I got home from work, he had eaten all ...


4

James has given you good advice on technique, so I'm going to focus on the psychology part -- your psychology, more than Norbert's. First, I'd like you to realise that this will be much less of a big deal for Norbert than it is to you. I'm not a nurse or vet or anything, but in the course of my life I have given injections to humans, cats, dogs, and even ...


4

We give our dog a bit of canned dog food while she gets her injection as a diversion. She's so busy eating her treat that she doesn't notice the injection. In fact, she gets excited when we say 'let's go get your shot", and lets us know when it's time for her shot by dancing and crying if we're not watching the clock.


4

My parents have a diabetic cat, and they tend to prefer the scruff of the neck - they have used other sites but the scruff seems to be the easiest to access. From what they were told, you just need to make sure there is enough room for the fluid. The scruff just tends to be an easy site, as if the cat is eating or holding still and sitting (my parents cat ...


4

First off speaking as someone that has had type I diabetes for 20 years, pain isn't the most common thing I associate with the disease. It does however cause a great many changes making life unpleasant and has led to secondary problems. Feline diabetes causes similar issues with your cat. Untreated diabetes leads to consistent elevated glucose levels in your ...


3

An update after a year We got very strict with his feeding times, only 2 full meals a day with only the occasional small dry food snacks periodically. We also only fed him food which had a high meat content or was totally grain free - such as: Hi-Life - It's Only Natural (The Tuna One) James Wellbeloved - Senior Turkey Encore Cat Food It's all much ...


3

You do need to change your feeding practices. From your description, it sounds as though your cat is being overfed, which will just make the diabetes worse. Diet First – I would change the diet to one appropriate for a diabetic patient, and will help with weight loss. It needs to be low in carbohydrates. There are many veterinary diets out there that would ...


3

Yes, but it's complicated. The glycemic index of dog foods depends on various variables, like which carbohydrates are contained in it and how much fiber and which type(s) of fiber the food contains. This study compared the glycemic indices of different dog foods with starches from different sources: The GI [glycemic index] (±SE) [standard error] of the ...


2

I question the 45 degree angle for needle insertion for a subcutaneous injection. I have been trained to ensure the needle is PARALLEL to the animal body's when injecting- parallel to the surface of the skin on the back. If you angle the needle too much, you may enter a muscle, go through the skin to the opposite side, or stick your own finger. And I found ...


2

I give it to him in his neck,but a couple of times while injecting insulin I put the needle in,and some came out of the needle while injecting him.I guess he moved ,not sure but i don't know if i got it in.I don't know how to pinch in a triangle on his neck.I don't know if i am doing it right.It is a scarey situation. I wish I could just inject into his ...


2

Please take your cat to the vet and express your concerns. Ask the vet directly how your cat feels on a day-to-day basis. Is she in pain? Is she uncomfortable? Is her mental state affected? What should you look for to identify pain and altered mental status? These answers should help you determine when euthanasia is the right time.


2

I hope everything turned out OK! I would say that if she hasn’t been back to the vet to take her. My 11 year old kitty (may she rest in peace) had subtle symptoms of the disease - in her case it was drinking more water than usual, increased diuresis and some weight loss - we thought it was because of the new food we put her on. Sadly, by the time we caught ...


1

If you are worried your cat will not eat its food after being given insulin, you could consider giving your cat a carb-free food when you are at work. I do not know the nutritional content of wet cat food, but if you give your cat some chicken or maybe some tuna, you would not need to give them insulin, because chicken and tuna are carb-free. Both chicken ...


1

If you inject your dog twice a day it's probably a slow-acting insulin. It shouldn't be a problem to give an injection earlier once in a while, but I wouldn't give it more than 1,5 hours earlier. Make sure to give the usual amount and continnue with your usual schedule the next morning. Humans usually use fast-acting insulin right before eating. If you were ...


1

I don't think you are doing anything wrong, it is an injection and she just isn't liking it. My Labrador is not liking his injections I am new to this too. I am luckier than you as he does not try to bite but he does lie down and roll on his back and wriggle. Same as he has been doing for years when I clip his claws. I think you need to relax a little and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible