15

First of all, don't release them into the environment without checking with your local authorities whether it's okay to do so. Chances are that the captive crickets you have bought are not local to your area. The introduction of non-native animals to an environment unused to them can disrupt the local wildlife by introducing new predators, spreading disease ...


14

We buy crickets regularly for two frogs, and we have purchased crickets from two local pet stores. Every batch of crickets we have purchased from one of the pet stores is noisy, chirping like crazy. Every batch of crickets we have purchased from the other pet store is essentially silent. As a result, we now only purchase crickets from the store with non-...


8

Gut loading is the process of giving your live-food animals a diet intended to enrich them nutritionally. It's exactly what it sounds like: you load up the feeder animal's gut with something you want to give to the animal that will eat it. It a sense, you're basically using the feeder as a vehicle for the pet's supplements. It's not a technique you can only ...


7

Don’t worry! Even humans eat crickets, so your dog will be totally fine. Dogs eat a lot of things worse than crickets (my parents’ dog regularly snacks on goose poop despite our best efforts to stop her). As a plus, crickets are a great source of protein and other nutrients! There could be a rare instance that the cricket was carrying a parasite, so just ...


7

It's possible, but I consider it unlikely. I found a good reference guide for the life cycle of crickets if you want to look through that. Basically, female crickets can store enough sperm to lay eggs (roughly) every other day for about two or three weeks. At that point, she would probably come across another male cricket, and they would mate, giving her ...


6

Inert gas asphyxiation may be effectively painless, and certainly more humane than death by extreme temperature. Here is an article describing a study done on the effects of nitrogen gas on kittens and puppies. Nitrogen can be purchased in canisters, and any airtight container with a relief valve will work; simply cycle the air out of the container until ...


3

If the cricket sheds the husk prior to feeding just throw it out. If you think about it, when they eat them in the wild they don't have any humans around to shed the husks for them. They surely eat them regardless. It won't hurt your lizard.


3

Crickets need heat more so than light. I'd try to get one of those cheap thermo-stickers. Try to keep it around 90 degrees. (Fahrenheit degrees) The chirping is the 1st thing I'd try to get going. Also instead of spending alot of money on cricket food. Try high protein dry cat food. Put it in a zip lock and roll it until it's almost powder. How many crickets ...


2

Many creatures eat bugs, don’t worry! A cat I know eat any bug she comes across, as long as there isn’t any harmful chemicals like pesticides or fertilizers, that dog will be fine!


1

I had an Ocelot gecko before who didnt eat dusted crickets. Only way I solved this problem was to go to petsmart and buy some live crickets and some food and vitamins for them and feed it to my lizard (his name was "Allie"). It worked and had no issues then. Lizards tend to be very picky with food and that could lead them to starving themselves and trust me ...


1

It's simple to reduce the singing of the crickets. You can either buy smaller or non-adult crickets, or turn a light fixture on them as if it were daylight. By the way, the males are the only ones who sing to get the females attention.


1

The colder they are the less they chirp. I put my aquarium with 50+ crickets by the window at night and they are ten times more quiet.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible