14

Neons and black skirt tetras* are both easy-going fish, so you won't have much problem with them being aggressive to newcomers. As long as anything you add isn't highly predatory/aggressive and isn't too huge, they'll probably play nice. (Bear in mind that if one fish can fit another into its mouth, it probably will at some point.) One thing that I'm not ...


12

In short, no. Tortoises and hamsters have different needs for their habitats. While some hamsters might live in the desert in the wild, any hamster you buy in the store will have been bred inside for so long that, among other things, they've evolved to live at a normal room temperature (60-75 °F / 16-24 °C). Meanwhile tortoises simply ...


12

I have kept all kinds of tetras: cardinal tetras; rummy-nose tetras; balloon red eye tetras; penguin tetras with neons; black neons without any problem. Apart from the tetra species, you can keep harlequin rasboras, nerite snails and Amano shrimps as well.


11

Is it true that ferrets don't get along with other pets? The answer is a qualified "no". I had two ferrets. The oldest was always, always happy to make new friends, regardless of the species. He was very excited to play with any new dog or cat he met, and would do the ferret "bounce" that typically indicates play. My other ferret was more curious than ...


11

@Yvette totally nailed it, but I will emphasize another consideration: Maybe some people can bond with and love any animal that shows up on their doorstep, but I can't, and I think it's too much to ask of anyone. Neither spouses nor pets should be chosen sight unseen by a third party, largely for the same reasons. If you're going to live with and care ...


9

There are several problems I can see with putting an Axolotl and a Pleco together. Space. Axolotls generally get to be about 12-14 inches in length, while common plecos will get to be about 2 feet long when they're fully grown. A common pleco itself needs a minimum of a 40 gallon(about 150 litre) aquarium. Temperature. Axolotls are naturally from coldwater ...


7

As you probably noticed ferrets are extremely social creatures. If you have ever neglected them and didn't give them attention due to being sick or such you would have noticed that they get angry at you for not giving them enough attention. And when they are angry they might even start biting you(it hurts a lot). Yes they are awake only for 8 hours at most ...


6

Turtles carry salmonella as well as other bacteria that can be harmful to your rabbit, both animals carry very different gut flora. Rabbits are so so sensitive with their GI tract, that's like the #1 issue we see in clinic (GI stasis, diarrhea, hairballs etc..), an imbalance can be disastrous. I'm sure a few drinks isn't going to be a problem but ideally ...


6

I'm inclined to say that dogs and sugar gliders are not compatible together, because there are enough cases where even well behaved dogs have killed sugar gliders. Even if it's accidental, I don't think the risk is worth it. The simple fact of the matter is that sugar gliders are tiny compared to even small dogs; and are so delicate that even though the dog ...


5

Due to the large size difference between a cockatoo and a finch, your cockatoo could easily hurt the finches without meaning to, no matter how sweet or friendly he is, so first things first, you should never let them out with the cockatoo. Now, if you're going to have them in a cage inside the aviary, that could work, but the main problem I'm seeing is in ...


5

It will be difficult but not impossible to find a turtle which fits your needs. There are some main factors you need to focus on: temperature and water quality. The temperature will be important for your turtle, the water quality for your fish. You need to find the kind of turtle, which will survive in the temperature region you live in. If you decide to ...


4

You could put in a Betta splendens (aka Siamese fighting fish). Contrary to their name, they get along with most fish quite well. I have one in my tank with neons, corys, hatchet fish, guppies, and some other fish. As long as you don't put them in with another male, or similar looking fish, or fish in the same family (the Pink Kisser and other gouramis ...


4

If you are doing aquaponics and you have to clean your tank, you are not doing it right. You should have an ammonia and nitrogen cycle going. I have two ponds, one on the top of my hillside and one on the bottom. I've had a permaculture food forest going for about 7 years now. I have a couple different species of fish in the top larger pond. That pond ...


4

Speaking towards the tilapia, there species is chyclids. These fish generally have a strong pecking order, and any fish in with them that is not used to a pecking order tends to get pecked, a lot! I had some tilapia in my aquaponics system and as they grew they even pecked and ate each other. I cannot talk towards clams or oysters, and I thought lobsters ...


4

I think it really depends on the surviving dogs personality and your wishes. Some dogs really do well as an only dog and even seem to enjoy being the center of attention. Some really enjoy interacting with other dogs are better off in a multi dog home. I think a couple good questions to ask yourself are: 1) Does your dog's play well with other dogs that ...


4

It is generally not recommended to keep any type of fish with Axolotls as they can nip at their gills or otherwise stress the axolotl. Plecos are definitely not compatible with axolotls for several reasons. One is the difference in needs for ideal living environment. Plecos thrive at warmer temperatures than are safe for an axolotl. The most important ...


4

There are many different types of aquarium crayfish, that have different levels of activity, aggression, size, and feeding habits, as well as different individual personalities, so its hard to say exactly if this would be ok or not. As a general answer, I think you are correct in thinking they would be dangerous for your fish. Guppies are not great ...


3

As others have said, crayfish would be an inappropriate fish to keep with your current selection. As an alternative to crayfish you might want to look at giant fan shrimp (Atya gabonensis). They look almost identical except these have fans not claws at the front. They don't grow as big as crayfish and they are not predatory. In fact, they're more likely to ...


3

Short answer: Yes! Long answer below Species selection (length, difficulty of care): Red tailed shark (4", intermediate) are semi-aggressive. Blue gourami (6", easy) are peaceful. Hatchets: marble (2", intermediate) are peaceful; marthae (2", intermediate) are peaceful; silver (2", difficult) are peaceful. Aesthetically speaking, ...


3

I have a lab and a cane corso. They are both 4. We got the lab first when it was 8 weeks old. She is a typical, happy, go-lucky lab - full of energy! We came across a male corso (a few months younger) that needed a home. At this time the lab was about 7 months old and the corso was about 3 months old. They have been a perfect match! The lab is almost the ...


3

Guppy males harass females quite aggressively, and it is therefore recommended that you have multiple females per male. Males will also flaunt each other and harass each other. Males exhibit this behavior, because reproduction in guppies works like this: Males tire females until they are slow and cannot avoid them. Males then make swooping passes with ...


2

If you want to add some larger fish that aren't a threat to your neons, here's some of the more interesting ones. I'm listing only hardy fish, there's number of other good ones like discus, but they have specialized requirements for care and are an expert level fish only: freshwater angelfish (can be risky but generally considered safe, start with small, ...


2

I don't have lizards. I do have cats. Even if your cats "get along well with lizards" that's really only a heuristic about what they will do with the next one. Cats are not hierarchical animals like dogs. Every cat negotiates with every other animal on its own (not based on an established pecking order). My point is simply that your cats are more likely ...


2

These lizards are actually not well receptive to human handling. While most lizards can be tamed down and don't commonly bite does not mean they are not stressed. In fact sail fin dragons are easily stressed which is why it is recommended that at least three walls of a sail fins cage is covered to reduce stress of the outside environment around him and ...


2

Sugar gliders are very high maintenance pets. They require an enormous amount of attention and care, and they are very fickle little things. Do not get a single glider - they have a huge amount of trouble living alone. Get two or more, or don't get any. Your house will need to be thoroughly prepared for sugar gliders. They can fit in tiny spaces, climb ...


2

I've always known them to be aggressive by nature, but the truth is that they will often display aggressive behaviour when they're feeling stressed. In their natural environment, Tiger Barbs are school fish and prefer to live in larger groups, so you're on the right track with having 4 together. Your school may be just not big enough. I've read that a ...


2

Producing these for food is not something to "stumble" upon. About the easiest thing on your list is tilapia, and you are probably not aware that all tilapia in the USA and Canada food markets are males - the fry are treated with hormones to achieve this. I would suggest starting with catfish in at least 1000 gallon (around 3800 liters) pond/tank. Look ...


2

There's a few things you can try to get the coexisting. 1) Put one in a carrier and let the other walk around it and sniff it, then switch who is in the carrier and who is walking around. 2) Take a blanket from each of them and put it in the same space as the opposing cat. This will get them a bit used to the smell of the other. 3) There's sprays that ...


2

This is normal for guppies; the males will chase the females, the only way to stop this is to remove the male guppy or be sure you have at least 3-4 females for every male guppy in your tank. To be sure the offspring survives, you need to get a floating hatchery where you can put the female just before she is going to give birth to her babies. Please take a ...


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