11

Teaching a retrieve is a great example of when you can use backchaining to get your desired effect. Essentially, when backchaining a sequence (in this case, go get something and bring it back), you start with the last thing in the sequence and add a ton of value into that, then slowly add in the steps backwards. Because you've built so much value into the ...


9

Although I'm 100% in favour of clicker training, in this case it might not be the best approach to start with. What you want to do is to make the dog enjoy and initiate playing fetch. To me this is closer to classical conditioning than to operant conditioning. Clicker training, and positive reinforcement training is about operant conditioning, you ...


6

There are literally thousands of resources talking about clicker training and the principles behind it, so I'll just cover some basics you need to look into. Firstly, clicker training was originally designed to use with whistles when teaching dolphins and whales tricks. The method goes back further and you'll run across Pavlov's dogs. We actually learned ...


6

This is a really great question... the answer is it depends and both or either. Dogs are VERY specific, they don't naturally generalize as much as humans do. I don't mean that they do not generalize... it just takes more experience\training to get there. This applies to your question because a specific movement from a stand to a sit is very different then ...


4

Sit pretty is a very difficult thing for a dog to do and it's great exercise for them, especially if you ask them to alternate between "pretty" and "down." In order to help the dog, I found it easier to start sitting with legs and feet in a "V" so the dog has something to lean against. Then you can ask for a hand touch (if they know it) and get them used to ...


4

A clicker can be used just like any other marker to teach your dog the exact point it was doing something you wanted. Any consistent cue can be used such as snapping your fingers, a word such as "yes" or "good," or even hand signals such as a thumbs up. By giving the dog a reward right after the mark, he will begin to associate the mark itself as good. A ...


4

Yes, they would learn faster if trained together because they'll see each other do the trick and get the treat. However, if you train them together there are going to be lots of noises and hypered kitites that would try to steal each other's treats. So the first thing to teach them is going to have to be the rule "No worries, everyone is gonna get some". ...


4

We’ve never actually tried to clicker train a cat before, but we suspect that training them independently using distinct clicker or commands sounds might be a good idea. Even if the desired action is the same, you should issue a unique command that is known only for that cat for that action. When both are in the room, only reward the cat which the command ...


4

I suggest you look for freeze dried fish cat treats. Typically fish is the only ingredient. They are somewhat smelly (which for pets is generally a desirable characteristic). It's easy to break into the desired size bits, so you can make it very small bits for regular treats, then use larger bits or some tuna for a 'jackpot treat'. If this doesn't work for ...


3

You should definitely get a different clicker. Clicker training works by connecting the sound of a clicker to a positive outcome. If the cat hears the clicker, but doesn't get a treat, you basically desensitize him, meaning the actual clicker training won't work as well in the future. To be honest, you don't even need a clicker, you just need a very ...


3

My cats love tuna, salmon and shrimp packaged treats, but the first ingredient listed on all three packages is chicken, so that’s out for you, at least for Temptations brand. Unfortunately, fresh seafood goes bad very quickly, and ditto for canned once open, so you’d need something packaged (and freeze-dried). Mine also like deli ham slices (ripped into ...


3

Here is my explanation for what growth plates are. The reason why it's a bad idea to train a puppy to do handstands before the growth plates have closed, is because the growth plates are so soft and so important for how the bones develop. If a growth plate is damaged, it will affect how the bone grows, it's what causes deformities and/or weak points in the ...


2

Training contacts is all about ensuring your dog puts at least one foot in the yellow at both ends of an obstacle and to ensure safe performance of the obstacles. The contact zones are the yellow areas and are a specific depth designed to prevent the dog from jumping from an unsafe height. Giving all the details would be a small book but I'll try to give ...


2

The answer on backward chaining was very good and I would like to suggest an augmentation to that approach. The OP stated that the dog is very interested in picking up sticks. Thus I would clear the yard of stray sticks and then take one stick and use that rather than the ball as the toy that the dog is to fetch (falling the gradual backward chaining ...


2

Having an helper during training can be great, especially when training distance. The helper can either dispense treats after a marker or prevent the dog from reinforcing when it does something wrong. Bad Dog Agility has a podcast specifically on different ways you can use a helper: http://baddogagility.com/episode-72-three-ways-to-use-a-helper/. As a note, ...


2

I think one of the key things you touched upon was giving the treat after the click, which means there is a pause even if it's only 500 ms or so (forward conditioning). While I can't be sure, it's possible the author specifically mentioned this step because it can be missed by many trainers who may be tempted to click and treat at the same time to ensure the ...


2

Any target in training is exactly that: a target that the trainee is supposed to interact with. The basic forms a target can have are: Target stick (the actual target is usually with a ball or similar at the end). The trainee is supposed to touch the target. Target spot (like a mat or blanket). The trainee is supposed to be on / inside the target spot. ...


2

Does your pup know "Leave it"? I've found it's easier to teach leave it and take it together, as opposed to take it and drop it. If your pup doesn't know leave it, you can start training him on that and make sure there's a clear distinction between when he's supposed to leave something and when he's supposed to take it. For example, sit on the floor a ...


2

Clicker training a cat takes great patience, but it can be a great bonding experience for you and your kitty. CLICKER TRAINING: For clicker training you need treats and a small clicker you can find at any pet store. The idea is - as soon as your cat does the wanted behavior, you click and give the kitty a treat. The click has to come immediately after ...


1

My advice is to STOP using the clicker. Your kitty isn't going to respond to a sound she doesn't like. TONGUE AS CLICKER: I have "clicker trained" my cats using my tongue as a clicker. I put the end of tongue to the roof of my mouth and make two quick, successive clicks. You have to be sure to make the exact sound each time. Using this method, you ...


1

You're basically on track. The trick earns a reward only when done on request. Otherwise he is training you to give treats when he jumps, which isn't what you had in mind. It's not an easy distinction for a car to learn, unless he's already used to talking commands. Mine seem to have learned a few words and sounds without deliberate training ... Down, ...


1

I'll also add: once they figure out that "doing this gets me a treat" they may try the behaviors uncued to see if you can be trained to reward them on demand. Be careful what you train. (According to one pro, may cats who have been trained to "raise their hand" on cue will try it uncued, to the point where it can be hard to get the cat not to do it when it ...


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