New answers tagged

2

Honestly, I suspect the biggest risk factor will be the attachment of the human, not the cat ;). If the cat is familiar with you and your home and follows you willingly, I see no reason why you couldn't keep it from the cold occasionally. However, if the cat wants to go outside and you don't let it, that could lead to stress and do more harm that good. ...


-1

I recommend separating them using a plexiglass, through the door. This is so that they can get sued to each other. Place their food on both ides of the plexiglass. So they eat right in front of each other p, and get used to themselves.


2

There is a fundamental difference between cats and dogs. You can teach a dog not to go on the table, but a cat is very likely to ignore the training and to it anyways. Also, in natural cat body language, looking a cat right in the eyes is a form of aggression and means the same as growling for a dog. When you picked her up and spoke to her, you probably ...


1

As long as you keep in mind that those dental sticks are only treats and the majority of the food is still cat food, I would go for dental treats in stick format for dogs. There are also dog treats made of dried animal skin that become a tough leathery consistency when soaked in water or saliva. They come in different forms and sizes. I would go for a single ...


2

It would be lovely to have the cats sleep somewhere warm and comfy, for them and for you. But cats persistently do their own thing. How about closer to the house? We had "barn cats" (but no barn) when we had a farmette. We had a visiting vet for all the animals (milk goats, the cats - 13 at one point - and all manner of fowl) and they got the same ...


0

Hearing range of cats is between 48Hz to 85kHz, while they are most sensitive to 300Hz to 32kHz. This means that while they can hear sounds with frequencies less than 300Hz, depending on the cat and age, they don't register it with full amplitude. Range of fundamental frequencies of drums is stated as 50Hz-250Hz. This falls out of cats' sensitivity range, ...


1

In this individual case it's probably a sign that he's not feeling at his best right now. Catching rodents requires a certain level of fitness and very sudden, very quick motions. He might either feel pain during the pouncing and catching, or he doesn't feel perfectly well in general and prefers to rest. Hyperthyroid can cause fatigue and muscle pain, so ...


3

It takes time to build trust. Letting him express his anxiety without further stress (approaching him when unwanted) or repercussions (maybe he was struck when hissing?) will let him learn he's safe in spite of his fears. If you stay away from him, it will take longer for him to learn this. Talk to him, a lot, so he knows when there are humans around. He may ...


2

It's not quite the same nor remotely as common as with dogs, but yes, cats do sometimes hump at random things like inanimate objects. It's more common with intact males or with males that were neutered later in life, but any cat including females might show the behavior. However, as I said, it doesn't present quite the same as with dogs. With dogs, it can ...


-2

The short answer to this is no,this do never happen in cats,male cats and dogs has a very different sexual behaviour,male cats will aggressively seek out the female cat in heat. I have never seen a male cat finding a replacement mate(object) in the same way as male dogs do when they ride your leg or rub against objects. Male cats gets exited from the ...


0

The best thing is to provide your cat with raw meat - that is their natural diet anyway - IF you can find a reliable source of healthy meat. As Elmy stated in a comment, cooking changes meat (vegetables too) a lot. What comes out is very different from what comes in. So if you cannot provide raw meat, then go ahead with commercial food for cats. If the ...


0

It looks like a wart-like growth to me. It is called papillomatosis. My cat has this and she gets bumps like these every once in a while. Good news is that the growths are almost always benign. My cat also doesn't seem to experience any pain from them, only mild discomfort depending on the location. However, you should definitely take your cat to the vet to ...


3

We cannot answer why she slapped you, simply because we cannot know what's going on in her head. However, the behavior change could be a warning sign. You should monitor her during the next days: Does she hide away for long times? Does she become lethargic, less active or sit in a cowering posture most of the time? Does she start to pant or breathe heavily ...


0

Cats (normally) hate citrus. If there are wires around citrus spray may not be the best idea, but even orange peel might discourage your cat from jumping up.


4

First of all: Don't panic! It's true that garlic is poisonous to cats, but as with everything, the dosage makes the poison. If the cat licked a carrot that was lightly coated in a sauce that contains some garlic, the total amount of ingested garlic is probably extremely small. The common signs of poisoning in cats, according to vetinfo are: Lethargy ...


2

If you have a year, that should be plenty of time to transition him from feral (which he clearly is no longer) to at least semi-domestic and reasonably comfortable indoors. Then, you can move him just like you would any other domestic cat with access to outdoors. Start with feeding him inside - first outside close to the door, then just inside and gradually ...


1

Bunny kicks eviscerate the prey; the jaws hold the prey in place for kicking while also choking it. If your adult cat actually saw the kitten as prey, it would be dead within seconds. Cats instinctively practice these hunting tactics, though at a non-lethal intensity, for play or for establishing dominance. Assuming your kitten is still alive, that is what ...


4

Just because a cat (male or female) is neutered doesn't automatically mean that it needs special food. The main risk after neutering is obesity, because neutered cats eat more and are less active than intact cats (Source: scientific study "Foods for Neutered Cats"). Of course obesity can lead to further health problems, but it's unlikely that a ...


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