14

There are a few distinct ways you can tackle this: 1) Look into getting a quality cat sitter. Talk to friends with pets, people in your neighborhood with pets, people at your vet's office. The unfortunate thing is that you will have to filter through a lot of bad info, but eventually you should be able to find some really good pet sitters. I'd ...


7

I can't tell you what to do, I've done both and what I do depends on a lot on what is currently going on in the home as well as my cats' personalities. This is a list of the questions I go through when considering the best situation for my pets. What is the Health of My Cat? Generally, any cat who is ill (with either an acute or chronic condition) should be ...


6

I know you're asking about boarding a cat but... I just want to start out by saying cats (by nature) associate territory with well being. So boarding a cat is much more stressful on it than boarding a dog. I'd encourage you to only board a cat if you can't find a cat sitter to come over to your place to feed it, change the litter box... I have no ...


4

No it's not normal for a dog to be sick after boarding, if you think she is running a fever then a vet visit is warranted. Dog's don't get colds or the flu, most common illness we see from boarding is kennel cough (bordetella). The main symptom is a continuous cough that can develop into a lung infection.


4

Self-answering what I've decided to do: Over the weekend I kept an eye on her, while letting her roam as usual during the day. The e-collar makes her a bit more clumsy, but otherwise she didn't get into any troubling situations and has been running and jumping about (despite my best efforts the first couple days) with no discomfort or injury. So, I feel ...


4

I travel frequently for work. If you are gone for up to 3 days (possibly 4) your cat(s) will be fine if you leave adequate food and water and buy a humongous litter box and scoop it before you leave. For 1-2 week long trips I have relatives or my S.O. checkin on the cats every few days, scoop the litter, refill water/food, feed treats, pet them and play ...


4

Dan S has a super answer (+1), but the OP has ruled out all of those options in recent comments. Look for a local cat rescue organization. I volunteer with a rabbit rescue, and one of the things we do is boarding in a volunteers home. Members/volunteers with the organization will board for a weekend or longer. It is not unusual for boarding to last ...


4

In some work travel scenarios, you can change to full time RV living. You and the dogs live in the Recreational Vehicle (RV) as your only home, and travel to where ever you need/want to. Be aware that if your dogs bark while you are gone, this is not going to be feasible. Alternately a full time roommate/dog sitter may be the solution. Everyone's ...


3

I think it's normal for dogs to be tuckered out after boarding. When my dog comes home from the kennel, she goes right to her 'place' and sleeps for hours. Playtime is hard work!


3

I agree that a cat sitter may be the best option in many cases, but looking into the details of catteries can still be useful. This site has a list of review as well as different things to do in order to see if a cattery is right for you. Just looking at one of these parts, visiting the cattery, may help you learn what you might be looking for when you visit....


3

Everyone is going to be a little different, but with respect to your current form (which I quite like), I would consider: Remove the "Rescued From" information, unless it's relevant to the care in which case the relevancy should be indicated. Add a "willing to spend" line by the vets to indicate how much cost you would be willing to bear in an medical ...


2

The short answer is that cats much prefer pet sitting (all other things being equal). Cats are territory based and assume their food and well being are derived from their environment (much like you might associate the income from your job with your well being). If the neighbor is as caring as those at the "cattery" your cat will be much happier being ...


1

I just wanted to add one thing to really look out for is the food that's given to the animals. They should be able and willing to accommodate special diets (that's why you're paying them). Some of the less humane shelters will feed their animals cheap food because it gives them diarrhea, which is easier for them to clean many cages at one time because they ...


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