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7

Budgerigars are common enough as pets that even a vet that isn't specialized in birds should have rudimentary knowledge. You should call any vet or pet clinic you find around you, describe the symptoms and ask if they would treat your pet. There's a chance they have an idea what's going on and you don't need to go to a specialist. And the initial phone call ...


6

Depending on your country call a vet or a licensed Wildlife Rehabilitator. They will be able to tell you what to do and where to bring the animal. Taking care of a wild bird is not simple and needs experience which Wildlife Centres for example have. They will raise the bird and release it back into the wild. Depending on your location (if you add that I ...


5

There is a very essential difference between "domesticated" and "tame". An animal that is "domesticated" was intentionally bred by humans over many generations to ensure a safe food supply that doesn't rely on hunting or to exploit other characteristics (like rodent control by cats). This process takes many generations bred in ...


4

The „pimple“ is a normal part of the bird’s anatomy, it’s the uropygial or oil gland and it produces the oils necessary to waterproof and care for his plumage - think of it as nature’s conditioner. Usually the gland is barely noticeable, because it’s hidden in the feathers. I am no vet, so I can’t judge whether the appearance is as it should be (it differs a ...


4

Your immediate task would be to try to comfort the bird, stroking the feathers, etc. because it is frightened and confused why this is happening. You want to prevent it from going into shock. http://www.birds-online.de/gesundheit/gessonstiges/schlaganfall_en.htm I found this website where it describes cerebral apoplexy which is a commonly called a stroke. ...


4

At this point in time the chicks (if there ever were some in the eggs) are certainly dead. Duck eggs need to be kept in a very narrow range of temperature to develop and the incubation time is 21 - 31 days. This period is very stressful for the mother, because she has to constantly turn and shift the eggs around to keep them at the same temperature, but she ...


3

It is quite possible he doesn't want to be scratched, not all birds enjoy being pet. However, the best bet you have is move very slowly and to let him come to you. Will he eat out of your hand? If not, working on that is a good first step. Then, with a supply of very tasty snacks, you can get him used to your other hand moving slowly around him (not toward ...


3

I raised a crow under similar circumstances; fed him mostly earth worms. In hindsight, he should have had a more balanced diet. I suggest commercial food for hand raised parrots and worms. We had his cage outside. When he was about full size we had the door open during the day. He figured out flying by himself, no problem. In winter, he was often loose in ...


3

Plucking out feathers is a common problem with cage birds. It is thought to be because of boredom. However, a friend of mine has a cockatoo that is mostly bald from plucking and she often plays with the bird and lets the bird run on the floor with a couple of small dogs. They play together well and the bird barks like a dog. So, I think plucking may be ...


3

He needs food mashed to semi-liquid mush and put in his mouth. A pet shop may have prepared food for infant parrots. A pigeon would need grains and corn, not vegetables. I once had a crow about that age; his favorite food was earthworms (cut into pieces and put into his mouth, at first).


2

I cannot give you a definite answer, but I observed a similar thing with our neighbor's chickens. We often throw a certain kind of garden weeds (which they love) over the fence for them and the hens always come running. But the rooster always waits and lets the hens eat first. Sometimes he starts eating after several minutes, sometimes he doesn't eat at all. ...


2

I reached out to my vet about this, and his answer was: I am not too concerned about the increase in naps during the day as long as she is otherwise doing well. It seems like she is eating well and acting fine otherwise. Sometimes, conures can sleep more when they are molting. They can also sleep more if they are a little more stressed than usual; if there ...


1

If the feather follicles are damaged in certain areas, then it's impossible for the feathers to grow back. Your bird will not have any luck in having all feathers again. I would recommend taking your bird to the vet to stop your bird from further plucking her feathers. According to this article at backyardchickens.com: If the feather follicles are damaged ...


1

It isn't surprising that your bird is upset, since she's still very young and is in a completely new place without her previous family. I've had new cockatiels who screamed when they were new to my home. It takes a lot of time, patience and--especially--attention while she builds a bond with you and feels secure in knowing that you will not leave her. The ...


1

The way I understand, you have her for only a few days / weeks. That is usually too short for the bird to learn to trust you and befriend you. On the other hand (if the video is with your bird, not something random from the net) the bird is actually trying to communicate with you. If you do not understand whatever she is saying, it is your problem :) Joke ...


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