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18

It is most important that a betta fish have the right environment. If the environment is right, it's easier to treat any illnesses the fish may develop. Your fish needs at least 5 gallons (19 L) (despite what a pet store employee recommends, you can always get a different tank). Additionally, the smaller the tank, the more frequently you need to perform ...


4

The existing answer gives a good course of action and one of the comments suggesting the source of the fish (i.e. the local fish store) might be a good one to follow up. Some fish stores even offer a guarantee with their fish (if it dies within a week, they'll replace provided your water quality is fine). Consider changing your fish store for bettas if ...


4

The first thing to check with sick fish is the water quality. As indicated in the excellent answer from Gwendolyn, small tanks need more frequent water changes (even if you're using a pump with a filter). Once a month seems a little infrequent for a tank that size. Personally, for my 1.6 gallon tank, I vacuum the gravel and do a water change of no more than ...


3

Other people have talked about possible issues presuming the problem is with the tank setup somehow. But you say you've had your Betta fish for 2 years. In all likelihood, it was already a year + old when you bought it; Betta fish live between 2 to 5 years, and probably the most common symptoms of old age are these kinds of problems, where they get ...


3

As long as air can get into the cup and the betta can't jump out of it, yes, the betta should be fine. They are kept in small cups for much longer periods than "overnight" in pet and fish stores, after all. However, as the cup has no more filtration than the tank, there was absolutely no need to remove the betta from the tank unless the water in ...


2

Since the water quality is OK (according to your statement), then the only thing remaining is that there is an infection in the tank, affecting only the betta. In this case, I would suggest to find a specialist (veterinarian?) in your area, to help you with identifying the disease and find a treatment. An alternative would be to try aquarium-compatible ...


2

Serving size for betta food very much depends on the brand/type/size of food. It even varies for pellets, but generally is 3-5 pellets twice a day. It’s also recommended to do less than what is instructed on the food container. For flakes, really all you can say is “a pinch”. It’s a trial and error process - how much can your betta eat within a set amount of ...


2

Using povidone iodine in your tank is not a good idea it is harmful for most water living animals and it will stain most plastics. If you want to do a total disinfection of your tank it is better to use hydrogen peroxide, as this breaks down to clean water. Remember, after you have disinfected your tank you will need to cycle it for a month or more; cycling ...


2

Answer to your question: you can't. However, here are a few tips: if you have seen him eat from the feeder, then he will probably do it when you're not watching; the Betta's mouth is oriented upwards. In its natural environment, he catches insects on the surface and feeding from below is not natural to him; a fish is not a dog: it can easily spend a few ...


2

While I cannot ask as a comment, and you mentioned trying everything, have you tried Erythromycin yet? In the photo, I noticed the fins seemed ragged and translucent in places, typical of either fin damage (sharp objects/other fish biting) or Fin Rot, a bacterial infection. Erythromycin treats bacterial infections, including Fin Rot. Other remedies like ...


1

Why would you take him out of the aquarium? His only risk is low temperature and a cup will cool much faster than a larger vessel. When I raised bettas ,I kept males in separate 1 L plastic bags suspended in a large heated aquarium ; no filters , no aeration ( they breath air directly )- no problem. In the wild ,one author wrote , " A betta is at home ...


1

In this case, it ended up not being a problem. After a couple of weeks, he's now grown to the point of being able to swallow the pellets easily.


1

This is definitely fin rot! Happens easily in unfiltered water, which a fish should never be in. Not to make you feel bad, I kept them in unfiltered bowls too until I learned how unhealthy it is for the fish. It is reversible with antibiotics, the one I’ve used is called kanaplex (kanamycin) and works just fine. You can either mix it into the water or their ...


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