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8

If my wife is pregnant, she may need to spend her days lying down on our couch - and with our second bedroom set aside to become a nursery, where will we keep the cats? Why can the cats not be around your wife? If we do let our cats roam about, how do I prevent them from jumping on my wife's pregnant belly? You don't, your wife does. Once they've been ...


3

This is a very common problem we see in this Stack Exchange. You had a great plan. Getting a carrier and seeing a vet for microchips is the best approach. In case it is not microchipped, prepare a paper collar. You basically write your details on a paper and wrap it around his neck. Make sure that the paper is not too thick, otherwise the animal might be ...


48

First of all, please calm down. Your question sounds as if any interaction with your cats would potentially endanger the life of your unborn child, but that is not the case. It's not the cat itself that poses a danger during pregnancy, but an infection called "toxoplasmosis" that is caused by "Toxoplasma gondii" parasites. This infection ...


1

Short answer: You cannot make your dog stop chasing balls. You just can make him chase your ball instead of any other ball. Please don't feel disappointed, but any ball is more important to your dog than you are. That means that you won't be able to call him back to you without offering him what he wants - a ball. The way to go is either buying a new ball ...


17

Your cat is not jealous of the new child. Your cat is stressed out. Most cats like calm, quiet, routine, and for their territory to not be disrupted. Unfortunately, with a new baby, all those things tend to go out the window. It seems to be a rather common reaction when new parents bring their child home, for their cat to start eliminating in locations where ...


1

Enforcing naptime worked! He was already napping on his own when I let him out, but I guess he was still over-exerting himself by getting my attention all day. I put him in bed in the bedroom for a few hours and he came out ready to fetch! In fact, he wants me to play fetch right now :)


3

Well, things turned out to be that being friendly with the bird and loving him, no matter what, worked! Now I have a very lovely parrot. So rules I followed are: If parrot behaves bad then do not interact with him for a while (~20 min) (parrots love social interaction and become very upset without it) If parrot behaves good then interact with him socially (...


2

I see 2 possibilities here, one more likely. First, make sure he isn't going blind. Simply engage him in play, preferably in a poorly lit room, and move your hand holding a toy or a treat far to the left and right. If he follows your hand with his head, he can see you well, but if he stays focused on your body and ignores your hand, he might have problems ...


0

Dogs know that when it's their time to go out on a leash they are happy and excited. Personally, I don't feel that its a problem. He's just happy to do something other than laying on the floor being quiet. Dogs were not made to just be a rug and lay there. Dogs' lives are so short I feel that every opportunity to have them happy is a blessing. Maybe it's not ...


0

Have you tried a doggy door, so the dog can go out when he wants? Also, this may seem weird, but dogs can see spirits; maybe one is bothering him. And then, maybe he just doesn't like being alone and needs some attention or he may want to sleep on the rug in your room and be close. Dogs are like people, they just want to feel loved.


3

This is a difficult situation and it may take some time for a solution to work. The first and most important question is: Why does your dog bark? Is there a jogger or a dog running around? Are there rodents or other animals in / under your house or in your roof that trigger her? Does she try to get your attention because he needs to pee? First try finding ...


2

Firstly don't worry. You needn't rush to correct this. If you try to take immediate action to 'make things okay', the cat will detect your unusual behaviour and be even more worried by it. Just behave absolutely normally but without forcing any attention on the cat and let them get over it in their own time. If, after a couple of weeks there is still a ...


3

Give your cat time and space. Remember that humans are about ten or more times the weight of an eight pound cat! That's got to be a bit scary. Some ideas: Slow blinks while extending your head a bit, leading with your nose. It's "I like and trust you" in Cat. Don't stare, that can be aggressive. If watching them and they look at you, do the ...


19

My girlfriend is a veterinary nurse and this is a situation she has seen and we've discussed it on several occasions. All animals are always on the lookout for danger. Even the most domesticated pets that led a house bound life since birth will have that natural behavior. When an event startles them, like dropping a plate on the ground in the kitchen, they ...


2

He may be trying to play with you, like he did with him littermates before they grew up and became less social (or disappeared). If someone is feeding him, he doesn’t need to hunt to survive, but the instinct to hunt is still there. Cats “play” by practicing their hunting skills, often on each other, which can seem aggressive to us thin-skinned humans. Try ...


2

I got my cat one year ago, at first arrival she attacked me multiple times. While I was chasing her around the house, hoping to pet or just to hold her and she would understand that I care about her. She ended up defecating everywhere from fear instead. A year later she feels so comfortable with me that she can jump on my chest while I am asleep. I ...


6

One possible explanation of the attack is that something scared your cat and, since you note that the cats “don’t like the dog”, your cat probably assumed the dog was to blame and attacked him in “self-defense”. Not fully trusting you afterward is likely because you undoubtedly have a bit of the dog’s scent on you. The best thing you can do to help her calm ...


25

This is a very common question on this SE and it makes perfect sense. The cat for some reason is traumatised by your action. You might have stepped on his tail, or she might just be upset because you defended the dog. It doesn't necessarily mean you did something bad, it is just impossible to relay the reasons behind our actions to the cats. The good thing ...


1

It is almost impossible to make cats do what you want them to do, but it is possible to make cats not do what you want them not to do. There is a hierarchy of actions which you should start carry out. Blow air to his face. Spray water to his face. Hit on the ground with a stick/club, like a meter or two from the animal. Start a vacuum cleaner near him. ...


4

I read through your previous post, and it sounds like the cats are making headway in their potential friendship. A soft paw hit is nothing to worry about. That may even be a sign of play, since they're both pretty young! To answer your question: locking a cat up for "bad behavior" is generally not recommended, because cats will respond negatively ...


1

Kittens are notoriously adventurous and will inevitably do things they shouldn't. A screen or door net is a fun and easy thing to climb. It will take a lot of patience to find what works best. You may even find that they will become less interested as they grow older. Here are some options to deter the kittens from climbing the screen: Try deterrent sprays....


1

Dogs are typically much harder to socialize as they age. They become rigid in their routines and less open to new experiences, so it takes much more time to try address their fear and anxiety. The most important thing you can do is separate the two via a physical boundary that still allows them to view each other (e.g., crating them next to each other). This ...


1

It isn't surprising that your bird is upset, since she's still very young and is in a completely new place without her previous family. I've had new cockatiels who screamed when they were new to my home. It takes a lot of time, patience and--especially--attention while she builds a bond with you and feels secure in knowing that you will not leave her. The ...


0

Bites are not necessarily aggressive. They can be requests for playing, or even just a display of affection. One of our cats, the one we call "my" cat because she's so attached to me, bites me whenever she's really enjoying the love she's getting. Especially when she was younger, she didn't really know how to regulate her bite strength, but it was ...


4

Cats are intensely territorial, and an unknown (and much larger) predator has invaded your resident kitten’s territory. He/she is scared and angry, but probably mostly scared. Hissing is a way for a cat to try to intimidate the invader into leaving without a fight, especially one the kitten would probably lose. The new cat is usually also afraid because it ...


1

The way I understand, you have her for only a few days / weeks. That is usually too short for the bird to learn to trust you and befriend you. On the other hand (if the video is with your bird, not something random from the net) the bird is actually trying to communicate with you. If you do not understand whatever she is saying, it is your problem :) Joke ...


2

As others have already mentioned, do not try to put them in face first—the cat will see what’s going on and do his/her best to avoid being stuffed into the carrier. A trick I have been taught, which has worked a treat with both the cats I have had (both being regular domestic cats): Grab the cat by his/her neck, thus inducing pinch-induced behavioral ...


1

Try using a different dish to feed him. One of the common reasons cats will eat with their paws is that they don't like putting their face in the dish their meal is being served in. It's theorized that they don't like the feeling of their whiskers touching the sides of the dish. Or it could be that the cat finds it difficult to eat around the corners of ...


2

I might be a little too late to answer this, but 4h is a very long ride for a cat. Contact to a vet about giving him a light sedative. Cats sometimes receive human sedatives, of the top of my head Xanax, but never dose it yourself. In spite of the age difference, 1 year old cat would be more stressed compared to the 4 month old kitten because getting used to ...


3

You should reduce the stress to a minimum, and that means reducing the sensual input. Being caught in a place with the intense scent of another cat will probably stress the new cat because she "invaded" the territory of another cat (against her will) and cannot escape. Put a clean towel into the pet carrier that is easy to wash if your new cat has ...


1

There are cats, which live in one room apartments with their owners, so the "locking in one room" should be not a problem for cats in general. And there are cats, that are alone for the time their owners are at work. So the "not watched cat" should be in general no problem for cats too. Even your cat is more lucky than this ones, because ...


2

Cats have well established routines. Cats love to eat, sleep, cuddle and play at the same time of each day. Therefore, if she allocated 3 AM to 4 AM for playtime, she will play at that time every day. Contrary to the common knowledge, cats are not nocturnal but crepuscular, meaning that they are more active at dawn and dusk than any other time period. If ...


0

I have 3 indoor male cats ages 20, 13, and 10. I have 6 water bowls throughout the house. The type of bowls containing various brands of daily changed bottled water and placement of the bowls have not changed since 2011. About 3-months ago, my 12-yr old started scooping out most of the water with his paw. This later progressed to tipping-over the entire bowl....


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