New answers tagged

0

Try holding up another toy and saying drop it it. Usally dogs will drop the toy they have for another one. Repeat this a bunch and try it with the one toy. Labs are very smart and will quickly learn. I've done this with my German Shepherd. And it worked. As well as my english pointer/coonhound mix.


4

Honestly, this sounds like every puppy / adolescent dog I've ever known. Just like human babies, young dogs explore their environment with their mouth. Children eventually grow into exploring with their hands, then with their eyes, but dogs don't have agile hands and keep taking things into their mouths for longer. I've never known a puppy that didn't ...


3

I once lived in a street with two sister cats rescued from a previous life. I don't know the prior circumstances (neglect, abuse, fantastic owner died suddenly and the cats had to be rehomed...). One of the sisters only ever left her new house to venture out into their back garden. The other acted like she owned the street, and particularly singled out my ...


2

Let's tackle the second problem first, it seems easier. You taught her a routine: When it's evening, you go out to potty When you come back inside, you play a very, very fun game for some time When the game is over, you go to sleep. Your dog is simply trying to start again at step 1 so she can have step 2 again. She is very intelligent and manipulates you ...


8

I have personal experiences with abused dogs and stolen cats who returned very ill and potentially abused. Will she remember her former life? Yes, definitely. People and animals remember traumatic experiences to be able to either avoid them in the future or deal with them better if they cannot be avoided. You may notice some quirks of hers. Maybe she's ...


3

Bunnies laying down to pancake are a great sign, it means they are comfortable. Rabbits do need enrichment items (toys), but not all rabbits like the same toys. My former rabbit loved fling toys--things like baby toy keys that he could throw with his mouth. My current rabbit doesn't really like those; she prefers chew toys such as willow balls and loves ...


7

No-one can tell the future, but I honestly think your cat will be happier on his own. Male cats aren't very social. If he isn't neutered, he'll probably always view the other cat as an intruder to his territory, no matter how hard you try to make them friends. Even if he's neutered, there's no guarantee that he'll like the other cat. Cats have their own ...


3

Burying (or not burying) waste is an instinctual behavior. You might be able to create an environment that facilitates the behavior you're looking for, but you're not going to teach a cat to do it the way you want. It may be that no reasonable accommodation will make your cat actually bury his waste properly. First off, check for medical issues. You ...


1

If you are not the owner of these dogs, there is not much you can do. There are many potential reasons for this kind of aggression. The dogs could have been socialized in a bad way, they probably received too little training and if dogs are left to themselves without regular human contact - either because they are guard dogs or live only with other dogs - ...


0

I adopted a cat, Ms. Nibbles, that had not been socialized very much as a kitten. She enjoyed play, but seemed unreceptive of 'hands on' interactions. I had a hairbrush of the sort used with blow-dryers, the kind having relatively few stiff bristles, each capped in a small sphere. Miss Nibbles enjoyed being brush with this, so each day I would geantly brush ...


4

In addition to Omar's answer, you should make your "bad" dog work for simple, everyday things. There are several different forms of puzzle feeders available that offer different levels of difficulty. Some can also be crafted as a DIY project. Have a look at this list for some different food puzzles and additional ideas to entertain your dog. The ...


3

I would be worried if a 10 months old GSD doesn't have plenty of energy. That being said, establishing routines, as well as repetition, is essential for training, but the most important thing is your own discipline when doing this. Dogs in general, but specially GSD, will behave like puppies until they are two years old (more or less); he will be like this ...


2

Abused animals often display behavior that seems illogical unless you know what exactly happened to the animal before it was rescued. I own a rescue dog who was abused and I noticed certain triggers that seem to completely switch off his brain and make him attack his own family. You need to understand that this is not the fault of the dog and he doesn't do ...


0

My two do the same, though they will take turns playing with a toy. It started within a few days of introducing them; they both went for the same toy and ended up fighting over it. And when my boys fight, they don’t want or need a toy distracting them! Now, when I bring a toy out, they look at each other to see who moves first, and that cat “owns” the toy ...


2

The older cat might just let the younger play alone since essentially, playing is hunting practice for cats, and it might think the younger one needs the practice more. We are currently observing something similar with our two older ones, they will mostly let the younger one play and observe, and only occasionally spring into action. If they do, they do not ...


2

I have two cats - one of them loves to meow at us in the morning, and the other is very quiet throughout the day. This is not a metaphor - this is just a way of explaining that cats are all different and will have different behavior depending on their personality. Our cat that meows more has a lot of different reasons to meow - sometimes they are hungry, ...


2

Aw, maybe your cat just wants some attention and hugs from you :) My guess is, she is just saying something like: "good morning, I'm so happy you are awake and can spend time with me now :3" But then you take a shower and the cat still wants attention, so she keeps meowing.You could try to cuddle with her for like 5 minutes after you got up in the ...


4

Should I make him stop? While I don't think it's imperative to make him stop, it would probably be better if you did. The most concerning reason is such a behavior is unsanitary. There are diseases like cat scratch fever that you can catch from a cat's saliva having contact with your mucus membranes, such as those in your mouth. Experts advise you to wash ...


3

If she's actually drooling or foaming at the mouth, she could have some sort of medical issue, ranging from overgrown teeth to an infection. Your best bet would be a proper exotics veterinarian to diagnose and treat her. From experience, a respiratory infection's running nose can look like "foam" or drool in the mouth area given they are so tiny! ...


1

Like others have said. The cat has probably learnt a negative association with the carrier. I have two cats and now I have several cats carriers. Typically the soft meshed ones. They really like them. Flexible, softer and they can pop their heads out of the top without escaping. Two are just for the vets. It seems a lot, but there is method to my madness. ...


4

This problem is more severe than you probably realize. You puppy is in a phase of life than will influence his personality and future behavior more than anything else. If you let him get his will by being aggressive, he will continue doing so as he grows older. First of all, you must not, under any circumstances, cause him pain or harm. That only teaches him ...


4

The short answer is: No. In general, there are 2 types of cats and dogs: Those who eat everything available and those who eat only as much as they need. From an evolutionary point of view eating everything edible is an advantage because it increases your chances of surviving times when no food at all is available to you. As far as I know, what type of eater ...


2

Some questions I would ask are: How old is your dog? How long has she had this "anxiety" of coming to you? Do you remember anything in particular that started it? It looks to me like this might be a relatively young dog, but you've been together long enough for both of you to find out that she likes being on your lap when you work. Since she is too ...


Top 50 recent answers are included