72

First of all, please calm down. Your question sounds as if any interaction with your cats would potentially endanger the life of your unborn child, but that is not the case. It's not the cat itself that poses a danger during pregnancy, but an infection called "toxoplasmosis" that is caused by "Toxoplasma gondii" parasites. This infection ...


67

I took her to a good vet today. She checked her, found that she was blind, but she was responding to sounds well. She was pacing in circles when she got stressed. Today with this new knowledge, I brought her home, started training her with sounds. She started responding well, she would circle a bit and then once she recognizes where the sound came from, she ...


67

I wouldn’t start giving treats for small accidents - what kind of behavior are you trying to reinforce? The cat won’t understand the concept of an “apology” via treats. And if careless weaving results in treats, kitty may end up with receiving more kicks trying to elicit treats from the human who is stumbling to the bathroom at night. My preferred way to ...


53

BEWARE OF RABIES! DANGER TO LIFE The symptoms you describe, the lack of motor control, the unawareness, staring into nothing, not being able to drink and eat on her own, could all be symptoms of rabies. Rabies is 100% lethal to all infected humans and animals that are not vaccinated. If you're not vaccinated, please get the vaccine for you and your family as ...


51

Purring is a sign of wellbeing for the house cat. She certainly purrs because you are petting her, but if she would be sleeping on you then chances are she would probably also be purring without you touching her. Imagine this. When you pet her it's sort of like when you get a massage. You might fall asleep or you might drift off a little bit. Your cat is the ...


51

Probably confirmation bias. Odds are, the cat is not lying down next to you every time you're about to get up. There are times when you get up without the cat lying down next to you, and time when the cat lies down next to you when you're not about to get up. However, because those times aren't remarkable, you don't remember them. Instead, you remember the ...


46

I don't think there are many animals that understand the concept of apology, as a high level concept as such, except for maybe some other advanced primates. MAYBE elephants, dolphins, whales or belugas. But an apology has fundamental parts which you can communicate. Every animal genus has its own language (some are universal). What you would want to ...


41

Please consider that the problem might not be the harness itself, but how you act with the harness. Chihuahuas are small dogs and can be slinky when they want to avoid something. If you grab her, lift her up and somehow force her into the harness, that process is very uncomfortable. Even if you don't cause her any pain, it's still uncomfortable from a ...


32

Cats can be temporarily paralyzed by pinching the skin on the back of their neck. This is called "pinch-induced behavioral inhibition" (PIBI) or "scruffing" or "clipnosis" (a composition of clip and hypnosis, because clips are often used in veterinary or scientific settings to keep cats immobile). It is a reflex in cats and ...


29

This is unfortunate, but nothing to worry about. Of course the new surroundings and new people scare him at first. If the cat was taken from his own family (his parents or siblings), he might be calling for them. If he was taken from another human, he might be calling for them. He's basically trying to find his former home and family by calling them. ...


25

This is a very common question on this SE and it makes perfect sense. The cat for some reason is traumatised by your action. You might have stepped on his tail, or she might just be upset because you defended the dog. It doesn't necessarily mean you did something bad, it is just impossible to relay the reasons behind our actions to the cats. The good thing ...


23

Use less threatening body language. While it sounds like you've come to this conclusion on your own, I reiterate this point to write a more general answer. In cat body language, staring down a cat is very aggressive and threatening. Instead, if you notice a cat looking at you, avert your eyes, and slowly blink instead. This is how cats communicate they are ...


19

My girlfriend is a veterinary nurse and this is a situation she has seen and we've discussed it on several occasions. All animals are always on the lookout for danger. Even the most domesticated pets that led a house bound life since birth will have that natural behavior. When an event startles them, like dropping a plate on the ground in the kitchen, they ...


19

Roosters are very territorial animals. They crow to mark their territory and warn other roosters off or establish their order of rank if there are several roosters in the flock. The easiest solution would be to have all the hens living in one big coop together and reduce the number of roosters to 1. You'll still hear him, but much less constantly. If your ...


18

Your cat is not jealous of the new child. Your cat is stressed out. Most cats like calm, quiet, routine, and for their territory to not be disrupted. Unfortunately, with a new baby, all those things tend to go out the window. It seems to be a rather common reaction when new parents bring their child home, for their cat to start eliminating in locations where ...


18

I'm sorry to tell you that, but your approach is wrong. That's not how you train separation and independence with your dog. What you currently do is training a command. You say a specific word, your dog does what is expected of her and she gets a reward. There is a clearly defined beginning (the word) and a clearly defined ending (getting a reward). Most ...


16

Let me sing to you the song of my people! Almost every Husky ever Huskies are very, very social dogs, even more so than many other breeds. They don't like being alone and they'll notice if something is up, calling for missing members of the pack, etc. Whether you can train a dog out of it has to be decided on a case by case basis. This howling for missing ...


16

The Harness May Be Uncomfortable I have a Golden Retriever and, like most Goldens, she LOVES going out and about. But she was showing similar signs (not wanting to come over and put the harness on, moving her head to make it harder to do, etc.) as your Chihuahua about 2 weeks after we got her a new harness. Once you got it on her, though, she was her ...


16

My advice on how to figure out which cat to adopt is pretty much always, "Talk to the people that are currently taking care of them." In general, they will know which animals are particularly adoptable, and they will definitely want to tell you. But also, they will have a much better idea of what their cats' temperaments might be like than you will ...


15

You're going in the right direction, with your efforts to make the couch unappealing, and provide scratchers as alternatives. You just need to experiment a bit more to discover the right combination of things to discourage it from the couch and encourage it to the scratchers. Since the blankets aren't working, try a different method to discourage the cat. ...


14

If my wife is pregnant, she may need to spend her days lying down on our couch - and with our second bedroom set aside to become a nursery, where will we keep the cats? Why can the cats not be around your wife? If we do let our cats roam about, how do I prevent them from jumping on my wife's pregnant belly? You don't, your wife does. Once they've been ...


13

I totally understand your frustration. Cats are very independent, complex creatures. I imagine your cat is very happy, you’re providing it everything I would suggest and then some. Seriously, give yourself some kudos for that. I have a few thoughts that may help: Firstly, cat ownership does require a certain level of “letting go”. When I got my cat, I was ...


12

Your cat isn't clairvoyant, it doesn't know you are about to get up. It just knows that you are part of its family and a comfy place to sleep. You may be connecting dots that aren't there. In my experience it's very normal for a cat to make itself comfortable on you at the most inopportune times. Maybe the cat is thinking "jeeze, every time I get ...


11

There's no good reason to assume that purring is tiring for cats. Whilst the exact mechanism by which cats purr is not fully understood, it seems to be an almost passive part of breathing to them. Specifically, it seems that they have specific nerve circuitry which, when activated, causes the vocal cords to flap quickly, producing the purr we hear. As far as ...


11

I knew a cat who literally purred the entire time he was awake. His vet liked to say that he "didn't know how to turn his engine off". It didn't appear to tire him at all, he had just as much energy as other cats. He never had any trouble falling asleep either (the purring would just fade out over the course of a couple of minutes). I wouldn't ...


11

New cats require patience. Especially a year-old cat - at this age they will have recently bonded quite strongly with whomever their previous owners were so they will need time to adjust and to warm up to you as their new "person". It takes more time and work than with a younger cat. Take time to just sit quietly in the room near them - cats can ...


11

There are different types of lip licking and there are different reasons for them. She might like your petting so much and becomes so relaxed that she actually starts drooling. Once you stop petting that sweet spot, she notices her drooling and licks her lips. She might also have been taught that she shouldn't lick people. Some dog owners allow their pets to ...


10

The comments are already clear about the fact that male cats (or dogs for that matter) don't go into "heat" at a seasonal cycle. In nature, it's usually the females that have a hormonal cycle and are willing to mate only at very few, specific days. The males, on the other hand, must always be ready for that rare day they find a female ready to mate....


9

Roosters crow, and there is no practical and humane way to silence them. You said "urban" so you live in a city or town. Many cities and towns have become more chicken-friendly in recent years, but in doing so they have enacted ordinances that limit the number of chickens per lot, set minimum distances between chicken coops and the lot line, and ...


8

I have personal experiences with abused dogs and stolen cats who returned very ill and potentially abused. Will she remember her former life? Yes, definitely. People and animals remember traumatic experiences to be able to either avoid them in the future or deal with them better if they cannot be avoided. You may notice some quirks of hers. Maybe she's ...


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