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12

Stop trying to force your cat to go to bed. Cats sleep a lot more then us humans do. According to wikipedia up to 20 hours a day. And they sleep differently as well in that they are prey animals in the wild and will sleep lightly. And you cannot tell you cat when to sleep. Or where to sleep. They have mind of their own. Same with food and toilet needs, ...


10

I covered the question a bit more broadly since the general problem may be of interest. Using the bed (or other furniture) is basically a subset. At any rate, by the three major trainable species: Cats Inappropriate Litter box quality is low, in other words it's not very clean Litter type may bother the cat, some may not like clay, etc. Urinary infection ...


6

There is a couple of ways to dampen or limit the ammonia smell. Baking soda: You can add this to the bedding and you do not need to use a lot of it. You can get this in bags from 1 kg to 1000 kg. It limits the smell of ammonia by increasing the PH so less urea is converted to ammonia. Lime: You can add this to the bedding but you need to use a larger amount ...


6

Cotton Wool Dangers There are some dangers to cotton wool such as: Ingestion - Intestinal blockage Limbs can get tangeled Hamsters LOVE to burrow so having a substrate where they can dig and hide is best. It acts as environmental enrichment as well as a safe place to hide. Layna has added a nice list of burrowing/bedding materials however I would only ...


5

Yes, you should be concerned. While it is cute in the beginning, it can become obsessive. It is pretty much an impossible to get all the wrinkles out of the bed while you are on it. No matter how hard she works at, Ruby will be unable to get all the wrinkles out. After a while (more than a year in this case) the continued attempts lead to obsessive ...


5

For most small rodents, such as rats or mice, I would look to use hardwood wood shavings (aspen is usually easily found, depends on where you are). Avoid softwood shavings, such as pine or cedar as they're known to be very problematic and not just for rats and mice. There is also other bedding options, commercially available, made from recycled papers that ...


4

Ok, I checked my best source for small animal Keeping (German site: Die Brain) What they advise is: Hay Straw Toilet paper (Shredded) paper (Make sure it has no chemicals on it, the more natural, the better) Dried leaves hemp Cotton is explicitly NOT recommeded! Anything that the hamster can get tangled in should be avoided. But as Toilet Paper made the ...


3

I second the advice of the answer from Flummox - you can't control when or where a cat sleeps. It simply is not possible. Why can't you let her roam the house and sleep when and where she wants? If this is a case of you wanting your cat to sleep with you in your bed, she will do so if she wants to - not because you want her to. The key to getting a cat to ...


3

What I like to use is shredded paper, because even though it is nessicary to clean it often, it has proven to be the more comfortable option for my mice. It is very easy for them to burrow in, and they can move and rip it as they please to build up on theirs “ house”. It is also really cheap. I can get many months out of one 3 dollar bag, it is also very ...


2

Depending on what you are using the lab rat for, this should be a very careful decision. They are many studies analyzing different types of cage beddings and many have advantages and disadvantages. As I do not know what you are using your rat for, I will provide you with a very useful document and allow you to decide. This document is from animalethics.org ...


1

For our pampered hamster who sadly passed away a few years ago (after a long and happy life), we used aspen wood chips everywhere but gave her soft paper bath tissue shreds for her bedding. She LOVED that and preferred it to arrange in her nest for sleeping, much more than the wood chips. It was soft and pliable and she'd spend hours arranging it before ...


1

Wood chips are fine to use! I typically have the majority of the cage in about 2 inches of ASPEN chips (any kinds of softwood are harmful to their delicate respiratory systems, this includes pine and cedar) and I give a 6 inch deep side of paper bedding like Kaytee Clean and Cozy or anything unscented for burrowing. Deep bedding is important! Only use aspen ...


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