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25

When was the last time you saw a wolf showering? :) We've got a pure breed Siberian Husky and an Alaskan Husky for 3.5 and 2 years now. The older one was bathed twice so far (before we got him and once last year due to excessive dirt). This does not include the dogs bathing on their own in bodies of water such as the kids pool we bought for them or our ...


18

General Rule: Whatever the breed is, it is advisable not to bathe your dog more than once a month unless otherwise instructed by a vet using proper shampoo and soap. If you bathe a dog too often, its coat will lose shine and the dog can become itchy. Also, dog has a natural coat protecting system which can get harmed by over-bathing. So, once a month is ...


17

To be honest, if you get most of the chunks out and blot the dampness up as much as you can, I'd let her clean the rest of it herself. Grooming is a self soothing activity, and since she doesn't know you, you cleaning her will stress her out. The exception would be if you know (or suspect) that she has a poop borne illness, and want to prevent the other cat ...


14

Clip the cat's nails. Put the cat either in a tub or kitchen sink with a towel on the bottom for good footing. Use a bowl to pour water over them after making sure it is a good temperature. Do not work on the head too much. A cat will fear drowning far more than being wet. Having feet on the ground should make it a lot calmer about the process.


14

This comes from their ancestors, wolves. The reason varies however, depending on the stench. Usually rolling in faeces of animals is to disguise their scent, thus being able to sneak upon their prey undetected. In the case of carcasses, this is basically a way of claiming it, kind of a "look what I got" towards other dogs. There are other cases however, ...


11

Chad's (user9's) answer strikes at the root of the bath problem; stress can cause heart attacks and GI stasis, both are deadly. Nevertheless, any discussion of bathing isn't complete without review of the function of a rabbit's coat. Rabbit's fur consists of a slick top coat and dense undercoat that constantly sheds. This design makes the fur self-...


10

I was afraid of damaging the shell (particularly in the growth regions) by scrubbing at it, so the tortoise's vet recommended using something like baby shampoo. Baby shampoo has had some unfavorable press in the last few years due to additives. However, most of these additives have been removed from the formulations, and it also uses mild surfactants ...


9

Often with cats you have to adopt a "do a little at a time strategy" as many cats do not like being restrained or roughly held down. Whichever cleaning method you use start by petting and praising them to get them relaxed, then only wipe them a few times. Afterwards pet, praise them more and give them a cat treat. You want them to associate your handling and ...


9

One method I've used for flea medication baths is the kitty burrito - wrap the cat securely in a towel then immerse cat and towel in the water (keep the water warm without being hot). This works best if the water isn't deep - you want enough for the medicated shampoo to soak through the towel to the cat's skin then use the towel to rub the shampoo in once ...


9

It is natural for a dog to have a light smell, I wouldn't bathe a dog unless it got dirty. Most dirt can simply be rubbed off the fur by using a dry towel, which I would prefer to bathing. Dogs are waterproof, so as long as you are not using soap there isn't much to worry about. Our Labradors used to jump into every water source available, no matter how ...


9

So, in general I would avoid bathing a cat unless there's a real strong need to do so. The only time I've ever really needed to do that was for fleas, the cat was unable to groom, or the cat got into something that it can't clean off itself. However, should there be a real need, I would normally avoid shampoos intended for human use. These are formulated to ...


8

There is a good guide for bathing tortoises here. All you really need to clean a tortoise's shell is water and a gentle scrubbing device of some kind, like a toothbrush or washcloth. Scrubbing (provided it's gentle) will not damage the shell and on the contrary can promote healthy shell growth. Fill a container with lukewarm water so that it covers the ...


8

As far as I know, bathing a guinea pig too often is a bad idea. Keep in mind a guinea-pig is a very sensitive pet, if you do that, you'll probably be harming their natural skin protection, which will lead to illnesses. If you really have to, I'd recommend bathing them once at month at most. Even if you don't believe it, guinea pigs are very self cleaning and ...


8

As instructed from the Simple Guard 3 web page, the product can be applied as soon as the dog has dried after a bath. You do not need to wait 48 hours before or after to apply the product. Q: Can I bathe my dog before or after I apply SimpleGuard 3? A: Yes, your pet just needs to be completely dry before applying SimpleGuard 3 and the product needs ...


8

Hamsters are desert animals and are built to live in an environment with a lot less moisture in it. That leads to a couple of considerations: They need to be warm. Despite the fur, they're not a cold temperature animal and so are vulnerable to cold. They're not naturally water creatures, given desert origins, and so one wouldn't expect to bathe in water. ...


8

Keep in mind that cats are licking themselves a lot. You wouldn't want to put anything on their fur that you don't want them to consume in small quantities. I am using a hypoallergenic, liquid PH 5.5 skin care soap in the rare cases where I want to properly clean our cats. (I rarely need to, they are indoor cats, but sometimes I enjoy the super soft fur to ...


8

Cats naturally clean themselves, unless they have a condition where they are unable to. If your cat cleans itself, I would recommend not washing it. Even though there are shampoos that are "safe" for cats, they still are putting unecessary chemicals onto the cats fur. Also, it is completely normal for cats to dislike being bathed.


7

We have a Norwegian Forest Cat who often gets mats and into plenty of messes. I second the answers above for the most mild methods for helping your cat gently get cleaned. If you have an issue where the poop is not coming out by hand, however, you may want to consider a bath. We do the following to clean it up when it's too much for us to "wait out" the ...


7

I agree with Beo and Zaralynda... both are good advice. I'd like to add some other tips and perspective here too. Cats, in general, hate bathing. However, if a cat is seriously soiled, especially with long fur that can get matted, I would try bathing the cat. The method that seems least painful (for the human at least) is the following- get into a close-...


7

Since we're having to give the cats multiple baths (every 2-3 days), I'm trimming their claws on the "off" bath days to give them time to dull a bit (a recently trimmed claw can still be sharp-ish). I have a handheld shower head installed in my bathtub, so I just climb into the bathtub with the cat (fully clothed). I found it's easier to manuever everything ...


6

We use a biosoap with a soft nail brush. Skatter absolutely loves having his shell scrubbed. We put a couple drops of soap in the sink, then dip the brush. Sure to always rinse him off after. It is part of our tank cleaning process. Everything is clean and fresh when he goes back!


6

This has happens a lot with long hair cats, but if you keep their litter bin clean it will happen less. Cats hate the small of their pee and poo, this is why they try to bury it. They don't like dirty litter boxes and will poo outside of it if it gets too dirty. If it gets dirty they will try to poo away from the poo in the bin but sometimes it puts them in ...


6

Don't use regular shampoo -- cats have very sensitive skin and regular shampoo will dry it out and irritate it. Most big pet stores will have special cat shampoo available. As an alternative, I have personally had good luck with cat "shampoo wipes." They're basically a wet wipe for washing your cat. They're much easier to use, since you don't have to worry ...


6

I used to take care of my sisters chinchilla, and I used a small-ish plastic box with the dust inside of it. As to "how", all we really had to do was to let him loose in the vicinity of the said box and he would get down to business, he knew well enough what the dust is for and I don't think I ever had to teach him how to bathe. Your container must be big ...


4

Given that you want to avoid a bath and that this is a rescue cat who doesn't know or trust you yet, I'd suggest the "little at a time" method. Depending on how nasty the poop is, you might want gloves for this (or simply prepare ample soap and water for yourself and your grooming tools afterwards), some brushes and sharp clippers. Your main goal is to get ...


4

This post is a little late after your original question, but I could not help to finish this for anyone who sees this question! You should try putting the wood pellets (Or whatever soft animal bedding you are using) on top of the newspaper, that will make the cage easier to clean, and it will be more comfortable to your cavy. :) Cleaning the cage really ...


4

My 17 y/o had a colon resection and goes in her sleep so her butt, tail, and hips are soiled with feces daily. I wipe her after each elimination if I see it, with a dry, then damp, then dry cloth but usually she needs a butt bath once a week. Today I noticed she had dried feces in her feet...not there yesterday when I clipped her toes. I'll butt bathe her in ...


4

If Peanut (cute name) is an inside dog, which it sounds like she is, cleaning weekly isn't necessary. However - dirt, germs, etc can get in there at any time when she goes outside, and they could get musty and later infected of water gets in there when she's being bathed, and not properly dried (just examples so not at all insinuating that you wouldn't be ...


4

Mario pretty much covered the answer, but just to add another voice to the mix. We had a Saint Bernard's for 8 years before he passed away and we bathed him like maybe once a year when we changed some stuff around the garden he would go into a frenzy and mess with any pile of dirt he would find and get all muddy - that's when he washed him. Saint Bernard's ...


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